First-timer Can-Yak build

Canoes, Kayaks, Pedal power

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curt1893
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First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby curt1893 » Mon Mar 13, 2017 6:55 am

Hello everyone. This is my introduction to the group. My name is Chris and I currently live just outside of Atlanta. This is my first build, but I have some experience in woodworking. I've built furniture, bookcases, and smaller things, but I've never tried taking on a boat before.

I've had the Can-Yak plans for a couple of weeks now and this weekend I finally started cutting out the frames. I attempted to use some transfer paper to copy the plans onto the wood, but either I didn't press hard enough or the paper is crap, because it didn't take. I ended up making some templates out of poster board that I could then trace. Cut it out with a jig-saw and hand planed it down to shape that matched the plans.

So far so good, but after the first day I only have the bottom cross members and knee boards cut. I have a few projects my wife wants me to complete first (pair of night stands, table top, and an outdoor table) before I can get back into it. I hope to have the boat finished by this summer.
Christopher Curtis

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Gayle Brantuk
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby Gayle Brantuk » Wed Mar 15, 2017 11:09 am

Christopher,

Welcome to our Forum! Glad to hear you're building a Can-Yak and sorry to hear about the transfer paper. It works well on lighter wood, but we recently discovered that for mahogany, it's very hard to see the lines. We are currently awaiting a shipment of BLUE transfer paper that seems to make a much darker line for the darker woods. I think making the cardboard templates is a great idea because then you can place them on the wood to get the best use of it.

Keep us posted on your progress!

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chugalug
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby chugalug » Wed Mar 15, 2017 3:51 pm

:D I like using thin plexiglass cutting on bandsaw after marking with black sharpie.use as pattern halves and flip over for other side.don't worry ,Gayle I didn't keep patterns;I used large piece for biggest pieces and kept cutting the same piece of plex for each part finally getting to smallest part. :D
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby Moeregaard » Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:33 pm

I traced the patterns onto vellum, then used a light coat of spray adhesive to attach them to the MDF templates I used to make the frame and stem pieces. Once the bits were rough cut to shape, I tacked the templates to the pieces with finishing nails and then cleaned everything up using a pattern-following bit on my router. Why did I go to all this fuss? Because the Can-Yak has duplicate parts for the frames and stems, and because I was building two boats. I'm a little (OK--a lot) on the obsessive/compulsive side and I wanted all identical pieces to be...identical. This worked really well and the two boats are virtually indistinguishable from each other.

This reminds me: I still owe Gayle the royalty fee for the second boat! Gayle, I'll get it on its way this weekend!

-Mark Shipley
A boat is just a wooden box with no right angles.

curt1893
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby curt1893 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:58 am

If I owned a router, I for sure would have cut the second frame piece using the first one. Once I cut I got the second one cut and shaved down, I just slapped them next to each other and decided that it was good enough. I image the shaping of the chine and sheer notches will make any differences either very obvious or not an issue.
Christopher Curtis

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Gayle Brantuk
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby Gayle Brantuk » Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:09 am

Thanks Mark! These are all great ways to transfer the patterns. Many of you are much more careful than we have ever been!

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby Bill Edmundson » Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:28 am

I'm with Gayle on this one for sure. It's a boat. If it was perfect, it would not be a boat! Boat and perfect don't belong in the same sentence. We have a few people who are close. But, even they have a few skeletons in the closet.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby Moeregaard » Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:15 pm

Bill Edmundson wrote:I'm with Gayle on this one for sure. It's a boat. If it was perfect, it would not be a boat! Boat and perfect don't belong in the same sentence. We have a few people who are close. But, even they have a few skeletons in the closet.

Bill


It's not how many skeletons you have, but how well you hide them!
A boat is just a wooden box with no right angles.

curt1893
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby curt1893 » Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:13 am

Just an update. I cut another couple of pieces for the frames. Just wanted everyone to know that I'm still making slow progress. Once I have a things together I'll start taking some pictures to share. Thanks for all of the comments. I'm trying to do it as accurately as possible, but sometimes I forget how organic these kind of projects can be.
Christopher Curtis

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hoodman
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby hoodman » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:26 pm

I've found accuracy to be a moving target with boat building.

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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby curt1893 » Mon Apr 17, 2017 6:18 am

Hello everyone. I've made some more progress on my build. I have the two frames screwed and glued together and most of my other boards cut and joined. This is my first time using epoxy, so I was pretty nervous about mixing. It wasn't too bad, but I'm making a lot of waste. I don't think it will be as bad when I go to encapsulate, but trying to paint it on and then get the boards lined up perfectly is taking more time than I want.

One of my chines is giving me some problems with the scarf joint. Just not getting a good enough mating surface. All of the rest seem to be fine, so I just need to keep trying.

Hopefully this weekend I can start screwing the stems, keel, frames, and strongback together.
Christopher Curtis

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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby Moeregaard » Tue Apr 18, 2017 8:57 pm

Christopher, gluing everything together and encapsulating the bits at the same time is like trying to glue two sticks of butter together. I get all the pieces (frames, stems, etc.) glued together and cured, and then encapsulate. When encapsulating, I brush the epoxy onto the wood and then wipe away the excess with paper towels--sometimes a lot of paper towels. This will ensure that everything is coated, but will also eliminate the drips and runs that are a pain in the neck to sand away later.

You didn't mention how you are scarfing your chine logs, but this is one of those operations where patience and accuracy really pay off. I use a 90-dgree fence clamped to my 10" miter saw. During the glue up, you need to ensure that the pieces are well supported over their entire lengths. It's worth playing around with some scrap lumber to get this right. Feel free to PM me and I'll be happy to send you a few photos.

-Mark Shipley
A boat is just a wooden box with no right angles.

curt1893
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby curt1893 » Wed Apr 19, 2017 4:47 am

Mark,

Yeah I can relate to that analogy. I tried a number of different methods to get a good scarf joint.

First, I built a 90-degree fence like the one you showed in your photo. Mine was probably a bit weaker, but my saw is also smaller I think. The problem I ran into that was that I didn't have a good cutting station, so I didn't see how I was going to hold up the 10' length of board while I was cutting.

The second method I used was to clamp the two boards together, overlapping their ends, and using a circular saw to cut through them at a low angle. It worked, but the angle wasn't as low as I would have liked as the clamps kept getting in the way.

The last method was to clamp them together with the ends flush and repeat the circular saw method. This worked a lot better, but if my hand twisted at all while trying to cut it, the two boards wouldn't be perfectly the same angle.

By this point, all of my boards worked except of the one, so I went back to the 90-degree fence idea, but this time used some saw horses and plywood to build a table that would hold the weight of the boards. This ended up working a lot better and resulted in a much cleaner cut. Got everything glued up and used whatever epoxy I had left to encapsulate more of the stems/frames. Since I bought smaller West Marine cans of resin and hardener, I didn't get any pumps. I did invest in some needles-syringes from the local pharmacy to suck up extremely small amounts of epoxy for small jobs.

Everything is curing today, so hopefully the joint holds and I can move on to start cutting and screwing everything together. Thanks for your helpful advice.
Christopher Curtis

curt1893
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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby curt1893 » Mon May 22, 2017 8:40 am

So it has been a while since I've updated everyone on my progress. I've gotten past my issue with joints, mostly by putting lots of screws through anything that thinks about moving. It really started looking like a Frankenstein monster. I've got one side of panels installed. Hopefully I didn't mess anything up by putting the side and bottom panels on first before the second set of side and bottom panels.

One issue that might come up is that I'm not sure that I left enough material on one of my side panels at the stem. I fear that when I go to overlap the other side, that the point the two boards make at the stem will be off center. One suggestion was, that if I couldn't salvage a clean straight contact point, was to cap it off and make a small transom, essentially making it a squared stern. It would only be about an inch wide or so. The other stern should make a nice clean point, so it looks like that would be the "front" of my no longer symmetrical can-yak.

Anyone have any thoughts on that?
Christopher Curtis

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Re: First-timer Can-Yak build

Postby Moeregaard » Thu May 25, 2017 9:21 pm

I would get all the planking installed before making plans to create a transom on one end of your CanYak. Chances are, the problem you describe isn't all that bad, and could probably be corrected with some filler. Once fiberglassed and painted, your sins will no longer be visible. You don't want a razor-sharp edge because it will be that much easier to damage. My boats have a radius of approximately 3/8" at both ends and this has worked well.

For holding things together while the epoxy cures, I used Kreg pocket screws, available at Home Depot and other big-box stores. They have a large head, so there's lots of bearing surface to clamp things together. Once cured, I simply remove the screws. If you haven't already done so, you might want to lay in a big supply of 2" C-clamps from Harbor Freight. They are always blowing these out for $1.99 each, and having a couple dozen of them will make your life a lot easier. At one time I had over 50 clamps holding the side planking in place. You can never have too many clamps.

Looking forward to seeing some photos of your build.

-Mark Shipley
A boat is just a wooden box with no right angles.


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