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bending and attaching chines

Posted: Mon May 06, 2019 4:12 pm
by BruceB
Question #3 I am attempting bend and align the chines. I am able to bend the chines but when I bring them next the stem, they come in at a 45 degree angle. It is if I have to twist the chine so it is parallel to the side of the stem. It appears to be the same problem for alignment with the transom. If that is true how in the world do you twist an oak 1x2?

Re: bending and attaching chines

Posted: Mon May 06, 2019 5:08 pm
by Hercdrvr
The dreaded twisting chine at the stem, every builder goes through this challenge. Twist the chine as much as you can when you attach it to the stem and add material during fairing if needed. It’s not a big deal.
Matt B

Re: bending and attaching chines

Posted: Mon May 06, 2019 5:26 pm
by Roberta
Easier to laminate two 1/2" by 2 pieces.

Roberta

Re: bending and attaching chines

Posted: Tue May 07, 2019 9:13 am
by JimmY
I installed the sheers first, and used clamps braced against the sheers to help with the twisting.

Re: bending and attaching chines

Posted: Tue May 07, 2019 10:57 am
by Hercdrvr
I agree with Roberta on laminating the chine. I never try to bend full size stock on the chine or sheer.
Jimmy has a good point too, sheer first. I gives you a better idea of where angle of the chine needs to be.
Matt B

Re: bending and attaching chines

Posted: Tue May 07, 2019 6:35 pm
by galamb
Yes, trying to bend full sized stock can sometimes result in an unintended consequence :)
shattered chine.jpg
The (replacement) did go on fine but I soaked them in water for almost two days (save the end that needed to be fastened to the stem) and I fastened at the stem "first" - gave me a ton more leverage getting the rest into place (my chines were 26' long). The "soggy" chine was much more co-operative and only took a few days to dry back out.