**Started** Sea Kayak Two in 1.5 weeks **Started**

Canoes, Kayaks, Pedal power

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boat-bill-der
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**Started** Sea Kayak Two in 1.5 weeks **Started**

Post by boat-bill-der »

I just bought the plans for a Sea Kayak Two.

I have seen all the pictorals on S&G method, as well as the one included with the plans but not very many specific to the Sea Kayak Two. I also can't seem to find any good write ups of the construction so I am still debating whether I want to start it or not...

Does anyone have a build website or some pictures of this model?

Any estimate on time to finish?

I am about to change jobs and have a solid week and a half to relax, and I know it's ambitious, but I would like to get the hull completed in that timeframe...

With fast epoxy and hot weather, you think it's possible?
Last edited by boat-bill-der on Mon Sep 22, 2008 3:18 pm, edited 11 times in total.

DeltaDawg
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Post by DeltaDawg »

Bill, yes I think you should be able to stitch the hull together and put in the epoxy putty fillets in 1-1/2 weeks. You are kidding about the fast hardner right? I used the slow hardner and even then worked early in the cool morning hours to put in my epoxy putty fillets. I took my time cleaning up the excess on the radi after I formed the fillet with a gherkin pickle jar lid, cleaning up the fillets with a plastic putty knife when they are wet cuts way down on the subsequent sanding.

Are you rigging the Sea Kayak Two for an electric trolling motor, dual battery switch and battery comparment so you can have a 2 batteries times 2 hours per battery times 6 mph equals 24 mile range too? Good luck. Leland

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

The Trolling motor is definitely a consideration, since my wife likes paddling for about 10 minutes, then it's up to me to get us home.

Also, I started looking at my building space, and realized that 19', 9" is HUGE.


I might have to build this thing in my backyard, and hang it outside under the eave over my back porch.

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

Also, I can't find 4mm plywood anywhere around here for less than $65 a sheet.

I want to use the 1/4" hydrotek that I used on the Flying Saucer, but does anyone think I'llhave a problem bending it? Will the boat be too heavy?

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

So I started this morning with a budget of $750 and I am at about $450 so far...

Here's my summary:

Plans and copper Wire - $136
1/4" Hydrotek Plywood - $160


These stuff is wall way cheap b/c I work @ West Marine (Saved $218 according to my receipt)

Total: $166 (would have been $380)
- 1 Gallon - West System Epoxy Resin, Hardener, Pumps and 503 Filler
- FG tape
- FG Application Tools
- Deck Hardware (Eye bolts, Shock Cord, Shock cord loops)
- Assorted Fasteners and



I still need FG cloth and more epoxy for the outside and paint, but I think I can still stay under budget and I think I'll be able to finish on time.

I am gonna do a little more tonight so I can stitch them together in the morning, but here's how I spent my day:

http://picasaweb.google.com/bill.levien/SeaKayak#

BTW, there are two layers of 1/4" ply so both sides are symmetrical. I screwed thru two of the eventual stitch holes to keep it all aligned while I cut and clean up the edges.


Image

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

While the pieces were still screwed together I finished drilling the stich holes, smoothing the edges and butt joining all my pieces together for the bottom and side planks...

I wanted to glue them up on top of each other so both sides were 100% identical and I didn't want to wait for the glue to dry to do so. Instead, I did the following:

1. Line up Straight line copied from plans on bottom port plank
2. Butt panels, apply adhexive and screw in butt block with temporary deck screws (I didn't mind doing this since my bottom and sides will be mostly painted)
3. Flip plank over onto wax paper to protect ground and prevent it from sticking to the ground
4. Apply another sheet of wax paper over the back (inside of actual boat)port panel butts
5. Align starbord plank with the help of protruding screws from port side, which are now sticking point up
4. Apply glue and screw butt block to starboard plank. The screws might barely hit the port plank beneath, but again I din't mind since I am painting most of the bottom and side.
5. Flip the planks back over so outside of butt down to the ground
6. Put a thin strip of wood over the joint and apply pressure to keep it all tight in case the screws didn't put enough pressure.

I hope that made sense and was helpfuly to someone, and I hope it wasn't in the instructions. I tend to not read instructions sometimes :oops:


Stitching to come tommorow morning!

Image

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boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

Of course, not too long before my first screw up... No stitching today.


The last set of epoxy pumps i bought were 1:1 ratio, so the mixture of 5:1 was achieved with 5 resin pumps, and 1 hardener pump.


Appearantly the set I picked up yesterday were 1:1, so 5 pumps of resin needed 5 pumps of hardener.


Needless to say, when I woke up this morning I was not happy.


I just finished un-screwing everything, scraping all the goop off with a razor blade, and reattaching.


I used a few drops more hardener to help kick the epoxy that soaked in, and I am hoping this works. If not, I will trace the contour of the assembled pieces, cut out the soaked center sections out and replace the center piece with a new longer piece so I am working with all fresh wood.

I hope it doesn't come to that though.

DeltaDawg
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Post by DeltaDawg »

Bill, I am sure your kayak will turn out great. Leland
Last edited by DeltaDawg on Mon Sep 22, 2008 3:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

Day 3:

Got everything sanded, drilled and wired up, and ready for putty tonight (hopefully). While the putty is drying, I hope to cut out my deck parts and prep for taping the seams with the 4" tape.



Image

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

Day 4:

I finished all the stitching of the bulkheads, chines and sheers.

I saw a technique on another builders site that shows him using small blobs of epoxy "tacks", kind of like welding...

I epoxied some of the deep areas at the bow and stern that will need two thinner buildups, and I "tacked" alot of the rest of the panels together.

I will come back tonight and remove the stitches, clean, sand and to add the full fillets to all the joints.

I also read that you should fillet first, then when the fillet is starting to set up you should pre-saturated the glass on a sheet of plywood, then lay the freshly saturated glass into the slightly tacky fillet to avoid having to sand.

I think i'll try that and let you all know how it goes.


Here's the ugly fillets at the bow that I will have to clean and sand (just to abrade) and then lay a nice smooth fillet overtop of it. The blobs are where the epoxy built up under the wire stitches, and I plan to lay the final fillet to about that thickness, then cover with glass.

Image

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

Day 5:

I went to work this morning and the boss told me to take off so I got a good 8 hours in today.

I filleted the keel, chines, sheers, and with the first lamination of fiberglass. What a messy process! I must have gone through about 50 pairs of harbor freight nitrile gloves, a gallon of epoxy, and 2 cans of West system adhesive filler (406?).

And, my camera broke so no pictures today. Trying to find a charger for the old one and maybe have pics tomorrow...


I guess tomorrow I am going to have to lay the 3" tape over the 4" tape I laid down today. I really don't want to though, it's a sloppy sloppy process.

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Post by boat-bill-der »

Day 6:

I had to take a break to fix my jeep, but I got the final interior taping done.

West Marine didn't have 3" tape, so I used 2" tape instead, but the joints seem nice and strong now.

I have the deck panels all cut, and I can tell it's going to be a bear to get them to fit. It was really hard tracing the longer thin pieces due to the paper shifting, but I think the are close enough. Taking today off and i'll coat the undersides of the decks tomorrow night, then fitting the panels and deck plates and taping the underside of the deck as much as possible.

Image

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BruceDow
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Post by BruceDow »

Boat-Bill-Der:

Thanks for posting this story. I've been following it eagerly. It is a good looking build so far.

As for fitting the decks, I agree that that is a challenge.

On the two Kayaks I've built, (not Glen-L designs) there was a piece called a "Sheer Clamp"... It is basically a 1x1 along the inside top of the sides. It is then faired to provide a good landing ground for the deck. The deck is cut slightly over-sized, then epoxied to this sheer clamp, and held in place with miles of tape while it sets up. Then the overhang is trimmed flush.

The side edge was a bit ugly, so I covered it with a piece of gunwale trim.

In your photos, it looks like the deck is just "stitched and glued" to the side? Is that right?
Bruce.

~~ Do what you love, and love what you do. ~~
~~ To me - only my boat is not yet perfect. Everybody else's is to be admired for I know the path they have walked (Dave Lott, 2010) ~~
Dow's Monaco Project

boat-bill-der
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Post by boat-bill-der »

Bruce,

Thanks for the encouragement... I wasn't sure if anyone was actually reading, but since there was no Sea Kayak build, I figured I would document it.

I am now at the stage where I am feeling like I bit off ore than I could chew, but I am still making progress.

I had a little more time than I anticipated, so I have about a week and a half left to go before I start a new job and pretty much lose all my free time.


To answer your question, the top deck will be stiched on, hopefully by tomorrow afternoon. There is no landing strip like you mention, but there is blocking at the bow and stern, then it lands on the bulkheads, and it also luckily lands on my butt blocks for some extra support. When it's epoxied on, it should have an exterior epoxy filleted seam, then a layer of glass.

It's gonna be hard to fillet and tape inside the front and rear watertight compartments, but the plans say to get as much as you can by flipping the boat upside down on a stand and working through the hatches. We'll see how that goes, but I guess it will depend on the size of my hatches and the length of my arms.

To cover the probably funny looking plywood deck/side seams, I want to paint the sides of the boat and wrap the paint around onto the deck like the covering boards on a Chris Craft, but leave the top deck and maybe a stripe on the side bright to show off the nice hydrotek grain

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BruceDow
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Post by BruceDow »

it's a bit of a crappy picture, but here's my gunwale treatment...

Image

The sides and bottom are painted a cream colour. The deck is "bright", and the gunwale strips are 1" x 1/4" western red cedar, rounded, and fastened with bronze ring nails (more for show, than anything else).

The black lines are just safety "grab ropes".

I've seen plywood 'yaks where they paint about 1" of the deck and the sides, as you describe. they look great.

Another option might be some brass or chrome rubrail trim... but then you need to deal with the points.


I've never taped the inside seams, but a book I have describes the process. They recommend the "paintbrush on a stick" to extend your reach. Also a head lamp. Also GOOD VENTILATION. (be careful in there)
Bruce.

~~ Do what you love, and love what you do. ~~
~~ To me - only my boat is not yet perfect. Everybody else's is to be admired for I know the path they have walked (Dave Lott, 2010) ~~
Dow's Monaco Project

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