Cooling on mahogany inboard boats

Topics not covered by another category.

Moderator: Bill Edmundson

Post Reply
magv12
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:33 am

Cooling on mahogany inboard boats

Post by magv12 » Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:50 am

How do these older inboard wood boats get the water in from the lake in order to do the cooling? Or do they just use a radiator? I'm not familiar with these designs, so excuse me for being ignorant on this. Are there water inlets in the rudder? Or are they somewhere else?

User avatar
Bill Edmundson
Posts: 11142
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 6:45 am
Location: Birmingham, AL, USA
Contact:

Re: Cooling on mahogany inboard boats

Post by Bill Edmundson » Wed Aug 09, 2017 11:33 am

Magv12

There will be a thru-hull pickup that goes to a raw water pump that feed a heat exchanger (wet radiator). This is what cools the engine system. Automotive radiators don't get enough air to work. Also, marine engines are always under load (never coasting). So, they really need a better cooling system.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

Nova SS
Posts: 2434
Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2003 10:42 pm
Location: Stirling, ON

Re: Cooling on mahogany inboard boats

Post by Nova SS » Wed Aug 09, 2017 12:57 pm

that's interesting Bill. I didn't realize that the runabouts used a heat exchanger in them. So the coolant in the motor is not raw water? I know in the hot boats (tornado, rampage, etc) the coolant in the motor is generally raw water normally pre-warmed by cooling the exhaust manifolds first before entering the engine block.
coolingrouting.gif

User avatar
NAMEngJS
Posts: 68
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 10:21 am
Location: Metairie, LA

Re: Cooling on mahogany inboard boats

Post by NAMEngJS » Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:40 pm

Either is possible, the closed system like Bill described or an open system that uses raw water. In a closed system you will have to plumb in an expansion tank to hold excess coolent (water, Naacool, ect.) and the system should be under positive pressure (expansion tank is higher than the rest of the system). The benefit of this is that the engine does not see raw water which is nice if you are in a saltwater environment as it lessens corrosion on internal parts. Also the circulation pump only needs to be sized to overcome the internal pipe friction of the system at the rated flow, it will not have to work to overcome any additional head from the difference in relative heights.

However you will need a second pump to pump the raw water through the heat exchanger (wet Radiator) adding another electrical user (if not engine driven) and the added piping. Both are viable options for the runabouts or any boat provided the builder has adequately prepared for either system.
-Juan Suarez

All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the recesses of their minds, wake to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers by day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible.

User avatar
Bill Edmundson
Posts: 11142
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 6:45 am
Location: Birmingham, AL, USA
Contact:

Re: Cooling on mahogany inboard boats

Post by Bill Edmundson » Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:20 pm

NAMEngJS is correct. There at two different systems. I prefer the two loop system. Two loop gives more consistent engine temperature. And, if there is a corrosion issue, changing a heat exchanger is easier than the whole engine. I have had both systems. I just feel better with two loops.

"Hot Boats" are trying to save every pound. That is fine.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

User avatar
jenko
Posts: 866
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 2:50 am
Location: Pine Mountain . Vic . Australia
Contact:

Re: Cooling on mahogany inboard boats

Post by jenko » Wed Aug 09, 2017 4:49 pm

There is also the simplicity and cost factor between the two types

Post Reply

Return to “Miscellaneous”