Lack of gloss spots

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mpark
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Lack of gloss spots

Post by mpark » Tue Jan 08, 2008 7:04 pm

This is a continuation of a thread I strated in the trailer forum. Since the topic has shifted to my painting problem, I'm moving to this forum.

I have painted with 3 coats of "System Three" primer and three coats of "System Three" paint (Lopez Blue). I have problems with areas of low gloss. They shifted after each coat. I used the crosslinker on each coat and waited about 1 - 2 hours between coats. I used the "roll and tip" method. I have attached images below. I have used the entire gallon and don't want to have to spend another $135.00 for another gallon. I painted on Sunday 1/6 so it should be 90% cured by this weekend. I was hoping to purchase a trailer and turn the boat after it has cured for 2 weeks, but I want to get the paint right before I turn it. Does anyone have any good advice on how to get a smoother look? Can I sand and buff it out? Am I SOL? In the other forum I was advised not to sand the low gloss areas because the paint may be to thin even thought there are three coats, so I have not.

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upspirate

Post by upspirate » Wed Jan 09, 2008 7:56 am

have you contacted the manufacturer's tech support for the paint & asked them & sent pics? Maybe they can advise

marksa1458
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Post by marksa1458 » Wed Jan 09, 2008 1:34 pm

I used the System Three paint as well on the sides of my boat. The paint doesn't flow as good as some of the other products on the market but can be buffed to a glossier finish.

It is very difficult to see in pictures, but how smooth was the surface prior to painting? Typically, you need to sand the epoxy coat smooth, prime and sand the prime coat smooth and then paint.

I probably had 100 hours of just sanding with progressively finer grits of sandpaper - it took ages....
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mpark
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Post by mpark » Wed Jan 09, 2008 7:51 pm

I did sand the epoxy and primer down to 600 grit, but there were some imperfections. The primer was way more smooth than the final coat of paint. The paint does have brush strokes in it as well. I’m curious, what grit did you start with (the paint instructions say to start with 600 grit, but that seems like it will take forever to get out the brush strokes), what grits did you move to and where did you end? Did you hand sand it or use a palm or orbital sander. I’m afraid to use the orbital sander that it may take out to much paint.

Thanks,

MCP

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billy c
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Post by billy c » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:21 pm

i used system three and encountered some problems with the paint also. i did have to sand down my final surface to level and then recoat. it would be difficult to smooth that surface to a level gloss with 600 grit paper. i think your best chance without adding another coat is to carefully use 320 and get the real high spots out then progress quickly to 400,600 grit as your surface levels so you dont have the deep scratches of the heavy grit as you near your final surface. it looks like maybe the paint was disturbed when it was beyond the fresh stage giving you the dull areas. i made the same mistake on the first coat that i applied. small areas tipped immediately worked best and not xlinking too much material at one time, as the end of the run the paint was hard to brush out.

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Dave Grason
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Post by Dave Grason » Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:56 am

Well, I have not gotten to the painting stage on my Zip, but the epoxy is smooth as it can be. I didn't go with any manufacturers recommendations. I just tore into it with the impatience that we ADHD people are so "blessed" with. :lol:

After the epoxy was hard as it was going to get, I broke the surface with grinding wheel and 80 grit paper. Then I cross sanded everything with an air file and 80 grit. Then I worked the grits going next to 100 & 150. Then I switched to random orbital (DA) sander and went 220.

Also, when I get into times like these, I like to spray a coat of regular old red oxide body primer. Using a long board and fine paper, I'll quickly find any high or low spots because the red oxide primer will sand right off really easily in the high places. Low spots will still have primer in them. This will let me know if I've gotten everything right or if I need to address problems. If I have problems to fix, then when I think I've got them good, I'll prime again. Only this time I'll use gray oxide primer. Alternating between the colors of primer allows me to continually keep track of any high or low spots. This is time consuming but WOW, the results in the end are awsome!
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kens
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Post by kens » Thu Jan 10, 2008 2:56 am

Dave:
That is plain 'old school' body shop technique there. It works every time. I agree with that absolutely. The thing is, when you do it that way, you have no need to go finer grit than 220 or so, 240, 260 at the most. Enamel has enough body to it to flow/fill 2xx grit sanded surface. It is longboard sanding you did that will make the finished paint look terrific. What you did with the 2 different primer coats we called 'guide coat'. Guide coat is a way to 'see' your progress as you prepare the surface; it allows you to actually see/feel the primer, layer by layer.

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Post by Smith Brother » Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:33 am

What was the temp, and the humidity on paint day?

Just wondered.


Dale in Indy

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Post by DanH » Thu Jan 10, 2008 8:30 am

I have used S3 on three boats now. You can easily get a get finish using it. The key to using S3 is:

- Work in very small areas at a time. Something like 2' x 2'.
- You must apply it in very thin coats. You won't get complete coverage after 2 coats with the darker colors. It may take 6 or 7 thin coats.
- Apply it with a high-density white foam roller (the long thin ones - I think Shurhold is the brand)
- Clean the tipping brush to remove drying paint occasionally

Usually when S3 isn't flowing well, it is drying too quickly. It can be thinned up to 20% per the instructions on the can. This helps when working in low humidity conditions.

S3 dries to a semi-gloss finish out of the can.

Like all paint jobs, the key is prep. Dark colors in particular will show every imperfection on the hull surface.

It is hard to tell how to improve your current finish from the pictures. How well was it faired before the color coat was applied? S3 paint can be buffed and polished. This is also how you get a gloss finish with S3 paint.

You have good advice above. I would definitely do some careful sanding and then apply one or two more thin coats. Then buff/polish to get a nice finish (use something like Buff Magic).

Dan

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mpark
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Post by mpark » Mon Feb 11, 2008 6:15 am

Followup...

I ended up sanding it smooth and repainting with a paint sprayer. It looks much better now!

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