Plywood frames?

A forum for contacting other builders of Ken Hankinson designs. These designs are now a part of the Glen-L family.

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Grampa Steve
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:04 pm

Thanks Peter,
Our plans said you could do the covering boards either way. I'm sure the laminated method would work just fine on any design like that with clean lines. Definitely strong. We're hoping the covering boards will accentuate the classic design by leaving them natural maple to contrast with the deck and sides. They're usually darker or even black, but we're not happy unless we're breaking rules somewhere!

Grampa Steve
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Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:47 pm

Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:26 pm

jprice wrote:Interesting stuff.
I wonder what exactly "UV stability" means? Does that mean it won't degrade at all from UV rays? Or is it just more resistant than normal epoxy, but still susceptible to it?


I too wish I understood the UV issue better. Through experimentation we've found the otherwise "not uv stable" Glen-L epoxy to be very impervious to any sun or weather condition if Mylar film is applied over the still wet surface and then squeegee out the bubbles. After cure it's a very attractive thick hard gloss finish. We left our test samples out in the Nevada desert for over 6 months with no surface deterioration. If however you do that without the Mylar film technique the epoxy will break down rapidly from exposure. I believe the gloss finish effectively reflects the UV, but usually I'm just smart enough to be dangerous.
We won't use the Mylar on the deck so the "UV stable" Super Sap resin should be fine as it will be protecting the boat just as it is intended to protect wood surfboards in similar environments.
At least it makes sense to me (but remember how smart I am lol).

Grampa Steve
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Sat Dec 15, 2012 2:15 pm

The covering boards took up to 11 laminations of 3/4" maple strips at the widest point.

Image

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Andy Garrett
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Andy Garrett » Sat Dec 15, 2012 8:19 pm

Yea, those laminated cover board have me thinking too...

Looks awesome! The design details tell me that someoine REALLY knows what they are doing with this boat. :wink:
Andy Garrett

Perhaps the slowest Zip build in Glen-L history...

Grampa Steve
Posts: 204
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:47 pm

Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Sun Dec 16, 2012 8:49 am

Thanks Andy,

Never built a boat before.
I've found that knowing just what you want is usually the hardest part, then trying to do it is the funest part (God willing).
"If you can dream it you can do it".

I've just been told by my sea captain brother that laminating the covering boards like that will make for a stiff boat. I hope that's a good thing.

Grampa Steve
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Thu Dec 27, 2012 1:10 pm

Still trying to figure out which color to stain the deck. First section is colonial maple, then cherry, then gun stock, then early American then golden pecan at the stern. Any opinions?

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billy c
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby billy c » Thu Dec 27, 2012 7:49 pm

Grampa Steve wrote:Still trying to figure out which color to stain the deck. First section is colonial maple, then cherry, then gun stock, then early American then golden pecan at the stern. Any opinions?

Image


IMO if you get your contrasting coverboard color on, that would make it easier to visualize
you want to at least have some of the red tone in your deck stain to tie in your topside finish. (Early American is out)
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

Grampa Steve
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Thu Dec 27, 2012 11:04 pm

[/quote]IMO if you get your contrasting coverboard color on, that would make it easier to visualize
you want to at least have some of the red tone in your deck stain to tie in your topside finish. (Early American is out)[/quote]

Billy, we were going for the maximum contrast with the natural unstained maple as shown, but I now think it's not doing what we were imagining. Something's not quite right, so we'll try some "honey maple" stain on the covering boards and we'll also try a pre stain sealer that might give us better results or different color shades with these stains as well.

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billy c
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby billy c » Fri Dec 28, 2012 5:55 am

Grampa Steve wrote:Billy, we were going for the maximum contrast with the natural unstained maple as shown, but I now think it's not doing what we were imagining. Something's not quite right, so we'll try some "honey maple" stain on the covering boards and we'll also try a pre stain sealer that might give us better results or different color shades with these stains as well.

thought maybe you were going for something similar to this contrast
Image
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

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Andy Garrett
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Andy Garrett » Fri Dec 28, 2012 7:00 am

I think the 'Gun Stock' has a nice warm glow that plays well with the color on the sides.
Andy Garrett

Perhaps the slowest Zip build in Glen-L history...

Grampa Steve
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Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:47 pm

Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Fri Dec 28, 2012 9:14 pm

billy c wrote:thought maybe you were going for something similar to this contrast
Image


Those Cris Craft Capris at least legitimize the the use of light colored wood against darker on classic wooden boats. We don't much care for the yellow coloring which I guess comes from the use of varnish over lighter wood. We'll try a couple more test samples to try to get the effect we're after.

Meanwhile we've been shaping the rails like I used to do on personal surfboards 45 years ago;
Image
Rough power planing goes pretty quick. It took a little over an hour to do both sides.
Image

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rocker
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby rocker » Sat Dec 29, 2012 4:42 am

Looks awesome! Maybe a cherry stain? I'd try it on a presealed and bare piece of scrap. :)
Scott again.
rocker13165@yahoo.com

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Andy Garrett
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Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Andy Garrett » Sat Dec 29, 2012 7:24 am

The tapered cover boards really elongate the boat visually. I love that look.

I had already planned a similar look for mine with the coverboards and kingplank all meeting at the bow in a sharp point. I can now use you beautiful vessel as a guide! :wink:
Andy Garrett

Perhaps the slowest Zip build in Glen-L history...

Grampa Steve
Posts: 204
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:47 pm

Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Sat Dec 29, 2012 9:33 pm

Andy Garrett wrote:The tapered cover boards really elongate the boat visually. I love that look.

I had already planned a similar look for mine with the coverboards and kingplank all meeting at the bow in a sharp point. I can now use you beautiful vessel as a guide! :wink:


Andy,
To be honest, it is elongated. We did slightly modify the bow stem hook to give the boat a Hacker Craft/Garwood look with a less blunt and straight angled bow line rather than the slightly curved shape in the plans. As a result this boat is almost 24 ft long stem to stern.

Grampa Steve
Posts: 204
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:47 pm

Re: Plywood frames?

Postby Grampa Steve » Mon Dec 31, 2012 7:14 pm

Deck sanded and ready for stain, whatever that will be.

Image


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