Getting started a few concerns.

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bayrat
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 11:42 pm
Location: Long Island ,NY

Getting started a few concerns.

Post by bayrat » Sat May 10, 2014 8:13 am

I have purchased the study plans for the Chinook. I have a couple things that are concerning me be for I get started. First off I am handy enough in multiple areas more of a Jack of all trades if you will but I have never built a boat. I am on Long Island so I should be able to get supplies and marine plywood without a problem.

My first concern is that will a lumber yard be able to provide me with the odd ball sized wood that is needed or will I have to do some of my own milling and if I mill them do I have to bring the lumber to exact size or the adjusted lumber yard sizing?

My second concern is am I capable of doing this project? When I looked over the study plans I was slightly disappointed that I didn't get a sneak peak of the instruction process. How in depth are the instructions or are the just a blueprint that I must decipher myself. I don't mind doing my research but I'd like to know what I am getting into.

Thanks
Tim

gdcarpenter
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Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by gdcarpenter » Sat May 10, 2014 10:51 am

Hi, I built a ZIP

Most plan material lists give 'nominal' dimensions, ie 1X4, which is actually 3/4 x 3 1/2, which would be the finished dimension you want, unless an 'actual' dimension is specified.

To confuse matters a tad more a 2" thick rough cut plank at a lumber store is called 8:4, meaning it's 8 units o f 1/4" thick, 2". So if the plans call for 'nominal' 1" you can buy finished 3/4" thick stock or go to the lumber yard and buy 4:4 stock that would likely be close to, but a tad less than 1" thick, then 'save money by milling the stock yourself to the finished dimensions.

My ZIP had plans that were amply sufficient for most everything, for anything that's not abundantly clear there is this great forum. The good thing is you start by building a building form and/or your frames, pretty straight forward. As the forms go on the jig you move on to the next step and the process starts to come together, difficult to comprehend the entire build until you get into it a bit.

If you have some patience, a sense of humor, ability to commit to a long term relationship (boats are she's), you will do just fine. A lot of folks here had never done much construction period, let alone build a boat. Good luck.
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

bayrat
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 11:42 pm
Location: Long Island ,NY

Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by bayrat » Sat May 10, 2014 1:20 pm

Thank you, the lumber thing is probably my biggest concern I'd rather put my time into the build rather than milling. So to me some of the lumber dimensions are odd because I'm not used to seeing them but a lumber yard should have them in stock?

gdcarpenter
Posts: 1382
Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by gdcarpenter » Sat May 10, 2014 2:33 pm

lenghty stock can be the most difficult to find, I needed 16' lengths to not have to splice my sheers and chines, so though most all my framing was white oak the sheers were a different hardwood species to find the length I wanted.

Lumber yards vary greatly, often carrying lots of 'rough cut' material, and some will mill the wood to your specs ($), and many will carry 'finished' material. You tell them what you need and they should understand and be able to explain. Personally I love walking thought the 'hardwood' room and hand selecting my stock materials.

I won't even mention the issue of lumber yards calculating cost on a board foot basis, but most do.

You can make it easy on yourself by just buying what you need, a bit at a time, until you get more comfortable, that will come.

PS: took 2 years to build my little ZIP, so be prepared for the long haul.
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

Trackhappy
Posts: 1412
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 5:42 pm
Location: Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. Building Gentry.

Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by Trackhappy » Sat May 10, 2014 3:39 pm

Hi Tim,
Don't stress about the instructions, there is plenty in there to get you through it, and this board fills in any further information you may need (as well as support when something goes amiss as it inevitably does). They are not "step by step" by any means as there are many different ways to do any particular task, but they are adequate for even an amateur to successfully complete the build. I had zero woodworking experience (I am a computer Dude) and my Gentry came out pretty well, which is one of the more difficult builds.
As for timber, it comes down to cost and convenience. You can obtain timber in exact sizes, just get the lumber supplier to thickness it for you, but:
That service comes at a significant cost.
You invariably need a particular sized piece of timber when you are heavy into it and have run out of that size.
Sometimes in a build you need an odd sized piece which you haven't ordered.
Unless stored correctly, finished timber can warp or get damaged while waiting to be used.

On balance I found it much better to buy a small thicknesser (with chip collector) and then I create whatever I need right there and then. You have the machine for other projects then.

All the best, and let us know how you go.
Glenn.
By the time I have built a boat, I'll be ready to build a boat....

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Lowka53
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Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by Lowka53 » Sat May 10, 2014 4:42 pm

8) you have to remember study plans are just to give you a idea of construction layout. yes they do not contain every thing you need to build but they are good if you want to compare hull framing between like boats and get a idea what it is going to take.
If the Chinook is what you want to build then buy the plans they have much more information on them than the study plans do. why would Glen-l give you a set of prints as a study plan that could be used to build the boat. we some times we tend to forget that they are a business and make a living on what products we buy from them. They are great people for sure and if possible I buy and use their products. :wink: so buy the the real plans and you will be scratching your head with information. 8) then if you have build questions there plenty of answers here to help you out :wink: :D
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
http://www.facebook.com/Home.Made.Boat.Building
Bon Voyage-"Wild Flower" 40' house boat being built
14' Mr John-being built
32' Supper Huck-in design

Rod H

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Bob Perkins
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Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by Bob Perkins » Sun May 11, 2014 8:38 am

I have always found it difficult to get the lumber I wanted milled to size. Even if I could find it - it was always twisted, warped, etc.

To that end - I purchased rough cut lumber from the hardwood supplier and milled everything myself. Maybe people have done it buying finished lumber - but I personally can't see how..

Surface planer, jointer, tablesaw..

I would do my milling all in one night and get it over with..
Not what you want to hear - but you get better finished stock this way..
Regards,
Bob Perkins

All the Fun Stuff
https://bperkins.wordpress.com/

Stevengould46
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 7:04 pm
Location: Brookhaven NY

Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by Stevengould46 » Sun May 11, 2014 2:47 pm

Where on LI are you Tim. I'm in Brookhaven and built Ken's boats before. Still have Miss Chris.

bayrat
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Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 11:42 pm
Location: Long Island ,NY

Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by bayrat » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:36 pm

Thank you everyone for the replies. I really think that milling my own will be the only way. Steve I am in Sayville, not to far.

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Lowka53
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Location: Ogden, Utah-Jubilee build
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Re: Getting started a few concerns.

Post by Lowka53 » Mon Jun 02, 2014 2:47 am

8) I mill a lot of my own material :lol: I even cut down the original trees then had a friend who had a saw mill saw it into broads for me than I air dried the wood for 10 years :lol: not the short term way to go. :wink: of course the wood was not cut to build a boat originally I was a cabinet maker/carpenter before I retired. :lol: :wink:
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
http://www.facebook.com/Home.Made.Boat.Building
Bon Voyage-"Wild Flower" 40' house boat being built
14' Mr John-being built
32' Supper Huck-in design

Rod H

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