Catastrophe

A forum for contacting other builders of Ken Hankinson designs. These designs are now a part of the Glen-L family.

Moderators: Bill Edmundson, billy c

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watkibe
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri May 05, 2017 9:19 pm

Re: Catastrophe

Postby watkibe » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:50 pm

I built a stout frame using 2x6s and lag screws, with casters at the corners. When I was putting the casters on, my wife asked if I got 2 of them with brakes. Of course I didn't...duh ! So now I clamp boards to the wheels to immobilize it when I am getting inside.
I am so glad I put the casters on it. It's great to be able to move it around to free up space and access as I need to.

"Hull weight" means how much the boat actually weighs when complete (probably with tanks empty), using the materials the designed specified. This is different from "Displacement", which is figured by the volume of the boat when normally loaded to float on it's design waterline (thus indicating the volume of water displaced). Hull weight is important when choosing the right trailer, cradle, crane or anything else needed to move the boat before it is in the water.
From the Great Pacific Northwest !

User avatar
watkibe
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri May 05, 2017 9:19 pm

Re: Catastrophe

Postby watkibe » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:59 pm

I don't see anybody telling you what ducks and splines are; if I missed it, sorry to repeat.
Splines are lines on a plan, but also they are real things: long, thin, flexible pieces of wood, used to fair out lines in actual size. Originally this was done on a big wooden floor, usually a sail loft, a process which came to be called "lofting".
Ducks are pieces of cast lead with a wire hook, that can be used to hold the spline in the desired position. The shape of the lead castings made somebody think of a duck, I guess !
From the Great Pacific Northwest !


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