Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

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ALR
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Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by ALR » Thu Aug 09, 2018 1:48 am

I think the Coastal Cruiser and True Grit are Hankinson designs. If not then I am posting in the wrong section.

I understand these are based on the same hull design, differing in the topside. Can someone elaborate on the differences, including among other things, the intended applications? It will help me understand better if the answers are in everyday English more than in nautical terms, since I am a relative novice.

Also, are the hulls displacement hulls, or possibly semi-displacement hulls?

I am intrigued with the possibility of building one of these boats in steel. My intended application would be to do some leisurely cruising, boat camping, and a little fishing on Western lakes and reservoirs, possibly including Lake Powell. Waterskiing or other high speed applications are not contemplated. Medium speed to get from "here to there" in a reasonable time would be a plus. A trailerable design is important.

Also, I think it would be fun to do a Great Loop cruise sometime. Would these boats be suitable for that application?

Thanks.

Cyclone
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by Cyclone » Fri Aug 10, 2018 10:11 am

As you mentioned they appear to have the same hull. The hull can plane so they look to be semi-displacement. Plans offer some length and cabin arrangement options to suit intended use. As far as "The great Loop" I think it is possible, and once you had some experience with this boat and did some research and planning you would be able to understand if you, the boat, and the Great Loop would be a good fit. As far as the hull configurations I would go with options with as much interior space as you think you need. If you wanted the option to go in salt water you would need to keep this in mind when making choices on the drives and related systems for salt water durability. For the hull and topside corrosion resistance and durability.

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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by neel thompson » Fri Aug 10, 2018 12:46 pm

Here is another possibility. This is a Double Eagle, stretched to 30'. It was at the Gathering in TN in 2012.... This boat is beautiful and will run close to 40 mph with a small block V8. I think the boat is designed to be 23', so you could stretch to any length you like up to 30'. If you look at the G-6 videos, you will see her under way on the Tennessee River.

http://boatbuilders.glen-l.com/wp-conte ... gb-039.jpg

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curtgard
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by curtgard » Fri Aug 10, 2018 1:31 pm

I built the True Grit and launched it in 2017. See my build blog and also read my three trip reports under Misc. I modified the hull length to 29'6" and also added a swim platform. The cabin is my own design as I wanted something that would provide reasonable living area in a 30' boat. Yes, I plan on starting the Great Loop in 2019. The hull is semi-displacement and you will need a fair amount of power if you want to plane the boat. I have an Evinrude E-tec 150 motor and WOT is 18 mph but I'm also nearly 11,000 lbs. I know the Gathering is a long way for you but if you are serious about building the True Grit, I would strongly suggest you see one in person before starting. There may be actually be three different True Grit boats at this years Gathering. I would be happy to answer any questions about my build.

Curt

ALR
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by ALR » Sat Aug 11, 2018 3:54 am

Curtgard, Where is the Gathering?

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by Bill Edmundson » Sat Aug 11, 2018 5:48 am

Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

Hercdrvr
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by Hercdrvr » Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:13 am

I’m thinking about a 29 ft Nor’wester for my retirement boat. Single outboat, rooftop A/C, super quiet Honda Gen, cartridge toilet so no holding tanks to pump out or wintwrize, small fresh water tank for an emergency navy shower if needed. Who showers on a boat under 30ft anyway? go to the shower at the marina or shower in the lake, all that water is heavy. Don’t answer that, I know the answer, she’s sitting right next to me, that’s “who showers on a boat”.
I think it could cruise near 30mph and get 4mpg with the 4 cylinder Yamaha 200hp if I keep the weight in the 5,000 lb range.
Good luck,
Matt B

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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by Hercdrvr » Sat Aug 11, 2018 1:09 pm

You mentioned get somewhere at a “reasonable speed”.
True Grit might not meet you expectation. Trying to extract more than about 12 mph from that hull is going to cost you in fuel. My idea of cruising speed is in the mid 20’s so a planning hull is the way to go for me.
Someone enlighten me why True Grit is a better option than say,
The Olympian or Nor'wester?
Matt B

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hoodman
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by hoodman » Sat Aug 11, 2018 1:18 pm

Matt, if you don't mind going 6-8 knots letting the autopilot do most of the work while you sit back with a glass of tea.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=25139

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curtgard
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by curtgard » Sat Aug 11, 2018 4:18 pm

I think it all boils down to how many creature comforts that you want out of a boat less than 30' or more important how many your wife wants. Also one needs to look seriously down the road, what is the main purpose or use of the boat. All three of the designs, will require a lot of man hours and a fair amount of dollars. Before I started building my True Grit, I was thinking about wanting to cruise at 15-20 mph. Well after two summers on the water, my thoughts have changed greatly about cruising speed. Now I think 7-9 mph is the way to go but if needed I can still go 15-18 mph. On the True Grit design, once you get over 8 mph, fuel costs go up rapidly, noise goes up greatly and you have to put your drink down. For example, going from 7.5 mph to 8.5 mph, the fuel usage doubles. I build my boat for extended cruising because in the next five years, I plan on cruising The Great Loop, exploring the Bahamas Islands, and going from Seattle to Skagway Alaska. I could not get over how nice the auto-pilot is to use. Any one that plans on doing multi-day cruises needs to really think hard on adding an auto-pilot. I think its mandatory.

Curt

ALR
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by ALR » Mon Aug 13, 2018 12:54 am

Quoting Curt: "I think 7-9 mph is the way to go but if needed I can still go 15-18 mph."

That's more or less about what I had in mind.

ALR
Last edited by ALR on Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

ALR
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by ALR » Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:17 am

A couple of more questions. I realize I am getting the cart before the horse in asking about details when I haven't even decided whether to build, but here goes:

What about having the front windows with a reverse slant? I see some boats have this, and it seems to me the windows would not get dirty as fast from rain and spray. When I say "reverse slant" I mean slanting in the opposite direction of a windshield of an automobile. Any thoughts about that?

Also, what about motive power? It seems to me that outboard motors would provide the most flexible and economical solution. Any pros or cons?

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NAMEngJS
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by NAMEngJS » Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:03 am

One of the chief reasons for the canted windows like you mentioned are for increased visibility. The line of sight to areas close to the vessel hull is increased if you are able to lean over the console and see the bow or sides of the vessel where your vision would have been obstructed/reduced by vertical windows. Spray and rain will still get onto the windows. I think this modification is quite possible and could make the pilot house feel roomier as well.

As far as outboard motors vs inboard or I/O option, the mechanical parts car a large cost driver for any project and can probably find a power-plant in all 3 options that are around the same efficiency. That being said most people are more familiar with outboards and the way that they handle especially at low speeds, as a inboard with a rudder reacts differently than an outboards ability to change the direction of thrust. That is not to say you would not get used to any system over time. Best thing to do is to find mechanics or dealers close to where you plan on doing most of your boating and ask what they see most commonly around your area, as replacement parts are to be more readily available to you as needed.
-Juan Suarez

All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the recesses of their minds, wake to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers by day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible.

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mrintense
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by mrintense » Mon Aug 13, 2018 11:12 am

When I was considering motor options for my Vera Cruise, there were two considerations (actually three) that stood out for me and ultimately moved the decision to outboards.

1. Installing an inboard is more mechanically complex.
2. For my boat at least, because of weight limitations, a four cylinder 3.0 was the biggest I could go and even that was pushing the weight liimit
3. And my boat was originally designed for an outboard but had the option (with less detail on specifics of mounting) for an I/O.

Downsides, as best I can tell (and I am not an expert here), are increased cost for an outboard and a need to ensure the transom of these older designs is strong enough for today's heavier (and more powerful) engines. Appearance is a downside as well.

The cost may be offset by the reduced complexity. The transom issue for me wasn't too hard to improve upon. As for appearance, I am not as concerned with that.

Downside to the inboard (for me at least) was the amount of aft cabin space it took up. It was greater than that needed by the motorwell for the outboard.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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curtgard
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Re: Coastal Cruiser vs. True Grit

Post by curtgard » Mon Aug 13, 2018 3:06 pm

I think that mrintense thought process was very similar to mine when I chose the Evinrude outboard for power. I didn't want anything taking up space in the cockpit area.

I did slant my windshields forward 6 degrees. See pictures in my build thread. This can be changed to most any slant forward or back as the cabin design and layout is pretty much up to the builder.

Curt

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