Squirt in CT

Outboard designs up to 14'

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mdweber
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Squirt in CT

Postby mdweber » Wed Mar 26, 2014 1:46 am

Hello,

A little over a month ago I purchased Pee Wee plans. After a week of work, I decided to scale up to the Squirt. So far I have finished my frames, and will be building the form in the next few days.

A note about me, I graduated from college in December, and have 7 months off before I begin work. In the meantime, I have great opportunity to build work on this boat, and am hoping to make it look as nice as some of the ones I have seen on here!

Question: after allowing my frames to dry following glue and nails, I have a few nails that are not perfectly flush with the gussets. The epoxy has long dried. Should I hammer these in or leave them slightly raised?

Thanks!

gdcarpenter
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby gdcarpenter » Wed Mar 26, 2014 3:58 am

Welcome and congrats on your build start. I would not leave the nails proud, either try to drive them in flush or sand them down. If you don't sooner or later you will 'find' them and say 'ouch'.
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

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BarnacleMike
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby BarnacleMike » Wed Mar 26, 2014 6:52 am

Ditto what GDCarpenter said.

Did you use the silicon bronze nails? If so, I think you'll find them relatively easy to sand down. I've got more than a few screw heads I'm having to sand down / through on my Utility build.

I would recommend sanding your nails then re-encapsulate, as you'll likely sand through some of the epoxy.

Sounds like you've found a near-perfect "life window" to build this thing! Congratulations!

I'll share the biggest lesson I've learned 'round here: Take your time to build each part as accurately as you can. Hurrying through steps will inevitably lead to mistakes. The mistakes are almost always fixable, but will take proportionally far more time to fix than simply taking your time in the first place.

I'm looking forward to following your project! I hope you'll post lots of photos.
-Michael

Built Utility "Perseverance" — completed Aug 2016
Currently building a Zip
My Boatbuilding Blog: http://barnaclemikeboats.blogspot.com/
My Website of Boat Photos: https://michaelsmaddox.wordpress.com


Steve S
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby Steve S » Thu Mar 27, 2014 9:22 am

BarnacleMike wrote:I'll share the biggest lesson I've learned 'round here: Take your time to build each part as accurately as you can. Hurrying through steps will inevitably lead to mistakes. The mistakes are almost always fixable, but will take proportionally far more time to fix than simply taking your time in the first place.


Well said, Michael

Steve
Squirt build

mdweber
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby mdweber » Thu Mar 27, 2014 10:22 pm

On that topic, I think I might be about to make a huge mistake...or I'm doing things right. Is anything in the following sentences incorrect (in terms of procedure, not grammar :lol: ). I will be encapsulating my frames before securing them to the form. I am encapsulating them with West Systems 105 and 205 that will be applied with a high density foam roller. To prepare the wood, I sanded with a random orbital sander rockin' 80 grit. Brushed off with a hand broom. Cleaned with denatured alcohol and paper towel. The portions that will be glued to the planking and batons/keel were taped with blue tape.

Anything I am missing or have incorrect? Thanks guys!

Steve S
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby Steve S » Fri Mar 28, 2014 5:45 am

I would remove the blue tape.
Steve
Squirt build

slug
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby slug » Fri Mar 28, 2014 5:53 am

And stay away from paper towels....they leave shreds of paper in the wood, thus in the finish. Everything else sounds great!
Doug

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BarnacleMike
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby BarnacleMike » Fri Mar 28, 2014 6:47 am

The blue painter's tape can be kind of annoying to remove if you get too much epoxy on it. It can be done, though.

If you're careful in your application of the epoxy to not put it where you don't want it, you should be fine. If a little bit gets on the outer edges, you can sand it off later if necessary. A very useful tool to have around is a narrow & flexible putty knife. After you've applied the epoxy, use the putty knife to scrape the epoxy away from where you don't want it — before the epoxy dries and causes you a bigger clean-up problem. The putty knife is particularly useful in keeping epoxy out of any frame notches you may have cut. Dried epoxy in a corner like that can be a real pain when it comes to fitting chines, battens, etc.

My two cents on prepping the wood before epoxy is that you really don't need to do much. I simply sanded mine lightly, then wiped it off with a rag before encapsulating. After encapsulating, however, you may need to clean off any amine blush. Ken Hankinson's book, How To Fiberglass Boats, mentions that all you need to do to clean away amine blush is wipe it off with warm water. (I've also used a mild amount of dish detergent to do this).
-Michael

Built Utility "Perseverance" — completed Aug 2016
Currently building a Zip
My Boatbuilding Blog: http://barnaclemikeboats.blogspot.com/
My Website of Boat Photos: https://michaelsmaddox.wordpress.com

gdcarpenter
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby gdcarpenter » Fri Mar 28, 2014 3:17 pm

I was painstaking detailed on my build, but personally don't see the point of the added work to tape off areas. To the best of my knowledge and understanding once applied and cured the epoxy (encapsulation) is 'one' with the wood. Just rough sand the surfaces that will be epoxied to something else later.

For what it's worth I applied at least two-three coats of encapsulation epoxy, rough sanding between coats or hitting the second coat while the first coat was still green. With only one coat, if you sand for a smooth finish the coating might get a tad thin.
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

mdweber
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby mdweber » Sun Mar 30, 2014 7:39 pm

Thanks for the advice, guys. I removed the blue tape. I'll use the putty knife method to keep any unwanted epoxy off the notches and sides.

I am seeking some advice. I want to laminate 1/4" mahogany ply wood onto the transom to leave a nice finish. Should I laminate this onto the 3/4" marine ply transom before or after I put the transom on the form?

Thanks!

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Ronb172
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby Ronb172 » Sun Mar 30, 2014 7:45 pm

I put my lamination on after the transom was attached and the hull was ready for planking. You'll have holes where the transom knee bolts to the transom if you laminate early.
Squirt almost ready to get wet
Building my third SUP.
Started the Topper build.

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BarnacleMike
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby BarnacleMike » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:42 pm

I added mine after it was on the form also. In fact, I did that fairly recently. The Raptor staples are very useful in this context. Once sanded away, they leave virtually no visible evidence of fasteners, unlike nail heads or screw heads.
-Michael

Built Utility "Perseverance" — completed Aug 2016
Currently building a Zip
My Boatbuilding Blog: http://barnaclemikeboats.blogspot.com/
My Website of Boat Photos: https://michaelsmaddox.wordpress.com

mdweber
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Joined: Fri Feb 14, 2014 5:56 pm

Re: Squirt in CT

Postby mdweber » Sun Mar 30, 2014 9:43 pm

Thank you everyone for answering my questions so quickly! Mike, I saw your staple technique on the blog, and it looks great. Quite sagacious! Ron, good thinking! I would not want to have any holes in the mahogany plywood.

As my frames are beginning to go on the form, I am wondering if there is a difference between galvanized and hot-dipped galvanized. I picked up the carriage bolts from HD and they were "galvanized." My wishful thinking is making me want to believe they are the same. My pessimism is telling me I'm going to have to order these online.

Speaking of carriage bolts, how are you guys sinking these? The west systems manual suggests drilling a hole a bit larger than the bolt and filling it with epoxy just before putting the bolt through. This allows the bolt to grab the epoxy rather than the wood. Also, do you predrill holes freehand or in a press? I am worried that freehand might not be perfectly straight.

Lastly, I have yet to attach the breasthook to the stem. Any techniques to line them up before gluing? And correct me if I am wrong, but is the scale drawing of the breasthook asymmetrical? I may be right......I may be crazy.

Thanks again, folks. I concede that I am an ignoramus. I'll try to get some pictures up here tomorrow.


Best,
Mike

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BarnacleMike
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Re: Squirt in CT

Postby BarnacleMike » Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:59 am

Hi Mike,

I would recommend using the silicon-bronze carriage bolts, (and screws, nails, etc.). Sometimes it's a pain to order stuff online as opposed to picking things up at Home Depot, but in the long run I believe it will pay off to use the best materials you can.

On sinking the carriage bolts: On my keel I simply counter-bored the hole enough that the bolt head would sink approximately 1/4" below the wood surface. I filled the hole in with thickened epoxy. When I was building a Squirt, I did not try to sink the carriage bolts at all on the deck beam-to-frame connection.

When assembling the breasthook and stem, it will help to clearly and accurately mark the centerline on all parts. This will help you with alignment during construction... not only on the breasthook & stem, but on other parts as well.

The breasthook should, in theory, be symmetrical from the centerline. I'd check your breasthook by simply laying it on the plans & seeing if it's the same. If it is, you should be fine. After all, many, many, many Squirts have been built over the years.

Looking forward to those pictures!
-Michael

Built Utility "Perseverance" — completed Aug 2016
Currently building a Zip
My Boatbuilding Blog: http://barnaclemikeboats.blogspot.com/
My Website of Boat Photos: https://michaelsmaddox.wordpress.com


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