Utility Chine Locations

Outboard designs up to 14'

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largej
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2013 1:47 pm
Location: Albany New York

Utility Chine Locations

Postby largej » Thu Dec 11, 2014 2:44 pm

Hi Folks,
Moving forward on my Utility build and need some advice on where the chines should end at the stem. Is there a specific height or is it a visual/feel where the boards want to be kinda thing. Any advice before I get too far forming the boards.
Thanks -- Jim
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gdcarpenter
Posts: 1325
Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Re: Utility Chine Locations

Postby gdcarpenter » Thu Dec 11, 2014 4:03 pm

The actual location on the stem is not critical. Chine to stem intersections are like snowflakes, no 2 alike.

From my ZIP build experience the key thing is the 'twist' in the chine where it hits the stem. You want the hull sides to be convex! Ergo the outside 'flat' side of he chine must be such that a piece of 'scrap' ply will bend 'around' the chine going from keel to shear.

On my ZIP I wound up with a wee bit of convex shape between bottom and side hull ply right close to the stem, I worked with it as it was. Kinda think it works like Moses 'parting' the seas, but it was unintentional.

Good thing you have the utility to 'practice' on before you do your ZIP!
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

lakeracer69
Posts: 189
Joined: Sun Dec 19, 2004 8:14 am
Location: NH

Re: Utility Chine Locations

Postby lakeracer69 » Thu Dec 11, 2014 4:09 pm

I used a combination of two methods. The first is "whatever makes a fair curve" ending on the stem. The second is that number is located in the "table of offsets" on your plans.

I used both to get it worked out. I think the two should be in general agreement.
I have also seen some builds, of various designs, with wildly different outcomes as to chine location. I don't think there is one exact right answer. Although, one will look more like the designed boat than another.

Don't forget to make your chine setback gauge to figure out where the chine lands on the stem. This step is imperative!

YMMV
As Conan the Barbarian says, " It's not how hard you can hit, it's how hard you can get hit and remain standing".

largej
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2013 1:47 pm
Location: Albany New York

Re: Utility Chine Locations

Postby largej » Mon Dec 15, 2014 2:07 pm

Thanks for the advice from both of you. What an amazing resource. And I looked at some of your work -- really nice stuff; I have a long ways to go.
I think I got it right on the chines and will post some pictures later - moving on to the sheers. Any thing you can share based on your experiences?
Not sure what is next but will need a bigger door to the basement.

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vupilot
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Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2009 7:36 am
Location: Indy
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Re: Utility Chine Locations

Postby vupilot » Mon Dec 15, 2014 4:07 pm

Nice to see more Utilities being built. Its a heck of a great boat. Sure looks nice to be working in a basement where the temps are consistent, a guy could work quickly and more often in that environment.

I found working from the stem aft to be easier on the sheer. I glued and screwed it to the stem and breasthook, bent it around as much as I dared, strapped/bungied/clamped it in that position for the day with boiling hot towels on it and completed the bend in the evening. Keep us posted.

gdcarpenter
Posts: 1325
Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Re: Utility Chine Locations

Postby gdcarpenter » Mon Dec 15, 2014 5:30 pm

Just be forewarned, by the time you fair your shears they will be a tiny triangular shape. not to worry, once you add the hull and side ply you have amazing strength in the triangular shape .

As for the door, "don't force it - get a bigger hammer"!
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com


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