Zip vs Flying Saucer

Outboard designs up to 14'

Moderator: ttownshaw

scarrera
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Port Coquitlam British Columbia

Zip vs Flying Saucer

Postby scarrera » Tue May 05, 2015 8:35 am

Hey guys

I'm sure this has been a much debated topic, but now I'm having a dilemma.....FS or Zip. Originally I thought FS was the way to go, but after seeing so many beautiful Zip builds its hard to ignore.

How do you decide which is the best for you?

Thanks in advance

Ben
In flying, the probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival.

User avatar
vupilot
Posts: 3233
Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2009 7:36 am
Location: Indy
Contact:

Re: Zip vs Flying Saucer

Postby vupilot » Tue May 05, 2015 6:49 pm

HI Ben,

I agonized over this as well. First, you'll have a blast with any boat you build. Sometimes the smaller boats are the most fun. However, If you have a few extra months to build and the extra room to build and store the Zip it isn't much extra time and money to build one step bigger. On the other hand if youre on a really tight budget of time and money already it may not be worth it for you if you don't really think youll need the extra seat. The boats will be nearly identical to operate when finished, just one will be able to carry a extra person or two and the Zip will take a bigger and likely more expensive motor. I'm really glad I built the Zip but I also have an 11ft Glen-L Utility and its just as much fun if not more. The only thing I would do different is make the transom for long shaft motors instead of short if building a Zip.

scarrera
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Port Coquitlam British Columbia

Re: Zip vs Flying Saucer

Postby scarrera » Tue May 05, 2015 7:25 pm

Thanks for your input Vupilot, I'll do the Zip! I checked out your build....what a nice job! The tons of photos you took really took you thru the whole build. I hope to chronicle my build the same way. Thanks again!
In flying, the probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival.

User avatar
BarnacleMike
Posts: 822
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:47 am
Location: North Georgia / Chattanooga Area
Contact:

Re: Zip vs Flying Saucer

Postby BarnacleMike » Wed May 06, 2015 6:32 pm

Ben, the boats are very similar, and in the long run I don't think you'd see a major investment difference (in either time or money) in the two. I've wrestled with this choice, too, and decided on the Zip for the basic reasons that I think the elongated shape and foredeck of the Zip is simply more elegant. I'm also hoping that the slightly larger size will make it more comfortable for a 3rd or possibly 4th passenger. My vote would be, between the two, to opt for the Zip if you have the room to build it.

I'd add one more thing: If you expect to regularly carry 4 passengers (or possibly a couple more), I'd SERIOUSLY consider the Malahini. I've been lucky enough to ride in both, and I'd have to say that the Malahini is a more comfortable and roomy boat overall. However, you'll also be looking at a bigger motor investment, too... like a 60hp or larger.

CHRIS,

On your comment about building the transom for long-shaft motors.... can you elaborate on that a little more? I think I read in a thread a while back that it's easier to connect the steering cable?
-Michael

Built Utility "Perseverance" — completed Aug 2016
Currently building a Zip
My Boatbuilding Blog: http://barnaclemikeboats.blogspot.com/
My Website of Boat Photos: https://michaelsmaddox.wordpress.com

User avatar
vupilot
Posts: 3233
Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2009 7:36 am
Location: Indy
Contact:

Re: Zip vs Flying Saucer

Postby vupilot » Wed May 06, 2015 7:27 pm

Sure Michael. I would build for a 20" transom because as much as I like the look of the short shaft motor being low and not sticking up higher they are just too darned hard to find these days in a HP above 25. You either have to get really lucky finding a good one or order one brand new. The 20" motors are just much more plentiful on the used market. Also as you correctly remembered I did state that the installation seems much easier on a long shaft motor. First, the steering tube on long shafts would be above the deck and motorwell so the steering rod hitting the sides of the motorwell is no longer a consideration. Also, I had to cut a notch in the motorwell frame to allow the steering cable to pass and enter into the motorwell since short shaft motors steering tilt tubes will be below the deck, within the motorwell. On long shafts simple exits from through the deck for the cables is all that is needed and that can be done anywhere convenient adjacent to the motorwell. The only downside is the motor sticks up 5" higher aesthetically. Other than that its all positives as I see it and the only thing I would do differently. Here is a picture of John Drakes Zip with a long shaft and the cable install routing
Attachments
untitled2.png

User avatar
Andy Garrett
Posts: 1278
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:44 pm
Location: Nampa, Idaho

Re: Zip vs Flying Saucer

Postby Andy Garrett » Fri May 08, 2015 9:52 am

Ah... I love this question!

IMHO, these are the exact same boats. They both have a 5'9" beam and a 27" hull depth. The frames are identical.

The Zip can be build up to 10% shorter, but not longer. The FS can be built up to 10% longer, but not shorter. This means that you could build a Zip and a FS of the exact same demensions, and the only difference would be the engine rating. The Zip can take a 40HP, while the FS is limited to a 25HP. This remains a mystery to me. I guess more length allows for more power.

Interestingly enough, the FS calls for a different set of trailer plans than the Zip if you elect to build you trailer (#650 vs #1000)

My Zip has a 20" transom (verticle measurement) and a long-shaft 2-stroke, 50HP Merc. It's fun and fast!
Andy Garrett

Perhaps the slowest Zip build in Glen-L history...


Return to “Small outboards”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bill Edmundson and 6 guests