Build time

Outboard designs up to 14'

Moderator: ttownshaw

Glyn
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2016 1:00 pm

Build time

Postby Glyn » Thu Mar 10, 2016 1:06 pm

Hi folks,

I'm considering building a zip but I'm wondering how much time I will need to invest in it? Can it be done in 500 hours or less?

Glyn

User avatar
BayouBengal
Posts: 928
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:29 am
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Re: Build time

Postby BayouBengal » Thu Mar 10, 2016 2:57 pm

You might can depending on how fast you are. It'd take me at least 7 or 8 hundred, but I'm a slow-poke.

User avatar
Dave Grason
Posts: 3762
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 5:19 am
Location: Nashville, Tn.

Re: Build time

Postby Dave Grason » Thu Mar 10, 2016 4:45 pm

I may say something upsetting here and if I do, I say it in the nicest possible way. Thinking in terms of how many hours to completion is a sure way to find frustration in your project. I fully understand the desire to get the build over with so that the enjoyment of a completely personalized and different craft from anything else on the water can begin. However, if you have never done a project like this, you are simply going to need about five times more time than you anticipated just because of the learning curve involved.

I learned this lesson as a teenager. I had this old pick-up truck that needed a new clutch. I had never done anything like this before. It took me a full day to remove the old clutch because I had to learn as I went. When I got the transmission out and the clutch pressure plate and disc replaced, I took a break for the night. I came back in the morning to put the trans back in and it took me about 4 hours to figure everything out, replace the trans and get everything buttoned up, including the linkage. I was so proud of myself right up until I found my brand new throw-out bearing still in the box on the table. And, as anyone who knows about this operation, it ain gonna work without that bearing being in place. The trans would have to come back out and go back in.

Time to completion? Twenty minutes.

The Lesson?

The first time you do ANYTHING, it will always take longer than you thought. The next time you do that same task, it will go faster than you thought and will only get faster and faster each time there after.
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

gdcarpenter
Posts: 1325
Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Re: Build time

Postby gdcarpenter » Thu Mar 10, 2016 4:47 pm

Short and simple answer, most likely yes , you can build it in 500 hours.

However, long answer wise, how 'detailed', 'fancy', and 'perfect' do you want it to be?

Do you want to encapsulate all parts before installing them, or try and encapsulate the whole enchilada once she's assembled?
Are you a stickler for detail, or are you okay with "It looks good from far, but far from good?
Do you want a lot of bells and whistles and interior refinements or a basic fishing boat?

No two ZIPs are the same, everyone has different skill levels and goals.
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

User avatar
vupilot
Posts: 3233
Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2009 7:36 am
Location: Indy
Contact:

Re: Build time

Postby vupilot » Thu Mar 10, 2016 4:53 pm

Mine took 733 hours over 18 month period. So basically I averaged 10 hours a week.

Glyn
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2016 1:00 pm

Re: Build time

Postby Glyn » Fri Mar 11, 2016 1:23 am

Thanks for the replies people!

I fully understand the 'it'll take as long as it needs to' thing and as it happens i am a bit of a stickler for detail. As it's just coming into spring I was just trying to gauge whether I could have the zip ready for this time next year (based on approx. 10 hours per week). If it takes more like 750 hours then that's fine, i'll aim for spring 2018.

The beauty of a project like the zip is that turning it over will be a little boost!

gdcarpenter
Posts: 1325
Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina

Re: Build time

Postby gdcarpenter » Fri Mar 11, 2016 7:31 am

At least you are thinking ahead, I just jumped in. Being very detail oriented, thinking a lot "outside the box", and doing many things I had never seen anyone else do, my ZIP took 2 years, never counted the hours.
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

User avatar
Dave Grason
Posts: 3762
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 5:19 am
Location: Nashville, Tn.

Re: Build time

Postby Dave Grason » Fri Mar 11, 2016 8:42 am

Glyn wrote: If it takes more like 750 hours then that's fine, i'll aim for spring 2018.


One member, David Lott, built a Riviera in the space of about a year. And the Riviera is a cold-molded design that is considerably more complicated than the simple Zip. But he committed to it and kept at it.

Yes, you now have the correct attitude and your project will be a real joy both to build and then to show off once it's built. However, I believe that, if you're willing to stick with a regular program of ... say... 10 hours a week like Chris suggested, you'll have the boat in the water by the spring of 2017. You don't want the project to stagnate the way mine has done.

I actually started my project (also a Zip) over ten years ago and it is not finished yet. In fact, I very likely will not have it ready anytime this year. But this is because there were so many thing pulling at me including the loss of my business, a surprise divorce and even the passing of close family members. And then there were almost five years of college to get my degree. After the loss of the business, I was facing some really severe poverty and of course, lack of funds will always effect a project. Oh yeah, life gets in the way often times.

I say this because, if you REALLY want to build your own boat - a boat you can be so proud of, you need to really commit to as much of a regular schedule as you can. If you're married, please get the wife on board. (or maybe your a gal and you need to get the husband on board) Project stagnation is a dangerous thing.

Do us a favor. With many internet forums, putting your location in your profile is not all that important. But in this particular community, it actually is important because often times, other members can help you source materials if they live close by or are familiar with suppliers in your area. In the years that I've been a member here, I've gotten together on numerous occasions with other forum members - or even people contemplating a build - face to face to help one another out. There is no other internet forum that has this particular aspect to it. Also, it was the members' including their locations in their profiles that inspired us to begin our Gatherings back in 2007. We began to notice that there were lots of member boat builders that lived within relatively easy driving distance and so, the Gatherings came about. If you have lurked here for a while, you will know about our Gathering every September at Nickajack lake near Chattanooga Tennessee. Of course you might be in Oz or New Zealand for all I know but the even now, the Aussie folks are beginning their own Gatherings based on our successes.

This is a very unique and just a GREAT community!
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Build time

Postby chugalug » Fri Mar 11, 2016 9:18 am

:D I've been working on my Bo-jest for the last 3 years off and on. Some days are full days ,some are just a few hours.Therapy as Ray calls it.want to put in water this spring ,but still have alot to do.didn't borrow any money for the project ,so doing what I can when I can afford it.funny how life can get in the way so just enjoy your build.
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

Moeregaard
Posts: 347
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 11:31 pm
Location: Thousand Oaks, California

Re: Build time

Postby Moeregaard » Fri Mar 11, 2016 9:30 pm

My dad and I started cutting wood for our Zip in August, 2007, and launched in June, 2008. My guess is that 90% of the work was completed on weekends, but we still tried to complete at least one small task per day during the week. Admittedly, our boat was built to a "minimalist" level, e.g., no lights, windshield, or bling. The trick is to plan each step before cutting any wood, do something on the project every day (to maintain project momentum), and always remember that the build process should be as much fun as the first launch. I'm currently working on a pair of Can Yaks and, while I could probably knock both boats out in six or eight weeks, I want to make them as nice as possible. So, I'm four months into this project and am finally starting to assemble the hulls. Think of it as a journey, not a destination.

Mark Shipley
A boat is just a wooden box with no right angles.

joshuab
Posts: 408
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 4:10 pm
Location: southern oregon coast
Contact:

Re: Build time

Postby joshuab » Mon Mar 14, 2016 2:57 pm

I am about a year and a half into my zip, four kids, single income family and i'm gettin it done, it's not easy but it is doable, I'm shooting for the 2yr mark, currently sitting around 380hrs. If I'm lucky i might have it in the water by the end of this summer, i refuse to do anything on this boat half @$$, so it will take as long as it takes, you can do it, just have to have determination :D ....josh
I cut twice and it's still too short :mrgreen:


Return to “Small outboards”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests