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Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:41 am
by JimmY
Looking good.

Just have a plan for fairing the end grain on the lap joints.

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 7:59 am
by String88
I checked on the wood in my area. Mahogany is $6 per board ft. white oak is $5 per board ft. ash is $3 per board ft.

I think I'll probably use a sander on the end grain for the lap joints...

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 1:05 pm
by String88
I may have found a motor for the boat (I know it's kinda early) it's a 50 hp short shaft. I'm not sure how much I need to reinforce the transom to handle the extra weight or hp. I don't know if it's even a good idea to get this motor. I need some advice. It's a used motor early 80s model for $300. Am I deranged? Maybe I am because I'm building a boat :lol:

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:11 pm
by BarnacleMike
IF you do purchase this motor, then I would highly recommend building your Flying Saucer to an extended length of 14 feet & 3–4 inches.

Essentially, that's going to give you a very similar boat to the Zip. Quite a few people have successfully used 50hp motors on Zips. I personally think it would be crazy to put a 50hp motor on a 12' Flying Saucer, but I believe it has been done before:
http://boatbuilders.glen-l.com/flying-s ... rry-waller

A well-built transom (at least 1" plywood with 1" framing), with a motor well, should be all the reinforcement you'd need.

That does sound like a good price for the motor, if it's in good condition. Can you give more details on the motor?

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:39 am
by JimmY
Sounds like a good deal, but I would thoroughly check it out.

For the transom, I assume the plans call for 3/4" plywood and 3/4" finished thickness framing. From your photo posted, I would just make the two top framing pieces into one wider board that runs from side to side, and widen the plywood doubler a bit. It is a simple mod even if you go with lower power.

I'm sure the design is strong enough as drawn.

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:00 am
by Bill Edmundson
String

I would build the transom up. If only for peace of mind. Then you won't think about it when the trailer hit a pothole or the when the boat pounds jumping a damn wake.

Bill

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 3:16 pm
by String88
It's a Johnson 50hp the seller isn't sure the year. He thinks late 70s early 80s. Here are a couple pics of the motor. It's been detached from a boat for about 2 years. He SAYS it's a good motor but I'm new to all this and I wouldn't know unless I saw it run.

Any ideas on how I can know if it will run without a boat to put it on?

I would definitely reinforce the transom and I've been thinking about stretching it out the 10% anyways...

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 3:42 pm
by hoodman
I'm going to be the voice of dissent here. Yeah it's going to run like crap and smoke and be really loud. And it's too big of a motor for a flying saucer. You'll be fighting the weight balance even with a properly sized outboard. A flying saucer will FLY with 25 hp as rated. I would even say you could go a with a little bit more power if you wanted but not DOUBLE. If you wait a little longer you'll easily find a more appropriate motor.

Anyways, have fun with your build. They are a lot of fun to build and you will learn a lot! I always thought the Flying saucer was a cool design.

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 3:59 pm
by Bill Edmundson
String

First, grab that fly wheel and see if it will turn. Do you feel any compression? Put some light oil thru the plug holes and turn it a few times before trying to start it.

Others will jump in now, who know what they're talking about.

Bill

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:28 pm
by Brad Tucker
I'm inclined to agree with Matt on being careful about overpowering. Here are a few tips on looking at an outboard:

If it has been sitting, replace the water pump impeller (should do it annually anyway).

Pull the lower unit oil drain plug and make sure there is no water present. Lower units are expensive.

Pull the spark plugs and make sure no metal is on them.

Check the compression. You should have no more than 5-7psi difference. Any more suggests a worn or damaged cylinder.

If it's crankable, hook it up to water and fire it up, but if the water pump is old, watch it like a hawk and make sure it doesn't run hot.

3 things that will kill a motor faster than anything else are a bad water pump, fishing line around the prop shaft (water gets into the lower unit), and water in the gas.

Back when I was 19 or so, my uncle had a boat dealership and shop, and one of my first jobs was working on Evinrudes and Johnsons.

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:52 pm
by String88
Thank you everyone so much for your help and advice.

At this point I'm inclined to pass on this particular motor. I would like to get a vintage motor, but I also want a 4 stroke. I understand hp on modern motors are measured differently than the old models. I'm trying to work my way through all the information. I want a good deal, but I don't want to spend money on a motor that won't work or requires a lot of work to get it going.

Thanks for the input. It's always welcome.

Re: Flying Saucer

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:11 pm
by kens
Can you get clear straight Cypress??
I used cypress for my motor stringers,
and tested some against strength of mahogany, i was quite surprised at cypress strength, and cost.