Outside build

Outboard designs up to 14'

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Mertz
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Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:56 am

Outside build

Postby Mertz » Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:33 am

Looking to build a zip, but i have no workshop. I live in nyc and was thinking about building a pvc tent frame covered in tarp. Is it possible to build one of these boats in outside conditions? Especially nyc winters. I was planning on trying to heat up my workspace with portable heaters, but skeptical about when it comes time for epoxy to cure. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Outside build

Postby Bill Edmundson » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:32 am

Mertz

I'm sure it can be done! One of our guys, Vlad, built his airplane in his apartment in NYC.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

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DrBryanJ
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Location: New Jersey

Re: Outside build

Postby DrBryanJ » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:48 am

Mertz, I live not far from NYC in northern NJ. I am building in an unheated garage and find that I must stop using epoxy mid of Dec to about beginning of March. We usually run a few degrees colder than the city. I am too cheap to keep garage heated long enough for epoxy to cure. Don't mind heating when I am actually in garage working. It has slowed me down considerably, but it is doable. By the way, if you ever want to come see my build you are more than welcome.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

Mertz
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Re: Outside build

Postby Mertz » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:54 am

Thanks guys for the input. I have been visiting glen l website for years now dreaming about building one of their boats and going to commit this year. I will assemble what i can in my house if i need to, i am not going to let my lack of workplace stop me.

Mertz
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Re: Outside build

Postby Mertz » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:57 am

Thanks drbryanj , i might take you up on the offer. At this point i think i have seen every picture out there on glen l boats. I might need to see one in person for that extea motivation.

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galamb
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Re: Outside build

Postby galamb » Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:39 pm

I'm a couple hundred miles north of you in Eastern Ontario.

I built one in "one of these".

glue job 2.jpg


Did it work? Yes.

Would I do it again? NO.

Was constantly at the mercy of the weather, the wind, humidity. So while "it worked" I estimate it easily took me three or four times as long to complete the project compared to what it would have taken had I built in a more permanent space where there would be a little more control over the elements.

This boat was a 26 footer so I did not have the inside space to do it. My current project (just started) will be built in a garage (unheated) but at least out of the wind, blowing rain (which I could never quite keep out completely) so everything came to a full stop often.

If it's your only choice then you have to work within your limitations. If I had my time back I would have made the (tent) a little more rigid - even if it was only beaver-barf panels fastened to the framework and then the (tarp) over that. It would have stopped it from blowing (somewhat) in the wind, would have stopped the rain and snow from pooling etc. The novelty of working in a tent wore pretty thin after the first couple of months.

Although on the odd occasion when mother nature was co-operating, it was nice to "roll up the wall" :)

side view.jpg
Graham

Yes, Plywood is "real" wood :)

A "professional" is someone who gets paid for their work - it doesn't necessarily mean they are good at it :)

Mertz
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Re: Outside build

Postby Mertz » Sun Aug 13, 2017 10:27 am

Thanks galamb, thats exactly what i had in mind. I was throwing around the idea of building a 3 walled structure that i could extend a tent off of for the build and then when i was finished turn the structure into a small tool shed. I live on the water and the only space i have is a 25 x 20 foot back deck. So, my outside space is very limited especially in the summer when the deck is in use. I think the zip would be a perfect fit. Also on another note, i live on a canal that does empty out completely on low tide. So, my boat would be sitting in mud 2 x a day and be left in the water from perhaps april to october. My question is can these boats withstand that kind of abuse because i imagine most glen l boat owners are taking their boats out after each use. Unfortunately trailering out every time i want to use it is not an option. Any suggestions or knowledge on this problem is greatly appreciated before i start this. Thanks.

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galamb
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Re: Outside build

Postby galamb » Sun Aug 13, 2017 2:28 pm

The year following those pics I did "beef up" the tent somewhat. I fixed 4x8 sheets of 1/4" chipboard to the sides and added some straps between the roof poles (to try and keep them from sagging. But it really was a jury rig kinda set-up.

Like I said, had I of set up the frame and added some 2x3's or 2x4's and made the sides "hard" (maybe the roof as well) and then put the (tarp) over it all of it, it probably would have extended my building opportunities a bit more.

I did compensate somewhat by using different hardeners. That boat was built primarily using WEST System stuff so had the Fast hardener when it was cool/cold and the Extra-Slow when it was super hot and the humidity was high. I even had a few occasions where the temperature dropped into the mid-30's overnight after I had glued something up. I was worried it wouldn't set-up but the fast hardener did come through, just took about twice as long as what would be expected. However, I stopped gluing anytime the forecast was saying it wouldn't reach the mid-40's during the day.

So at least my experience was (with WEST) that if it got a good 3 or 4 hours above 40, even if it dipped below that overnight, as long as it was back up in the mid-40's the next day that the initial cure would happen, just took about 48-60 hours instead of the more typical 24 or so.

Even in an unheated (enclosed) space I could have put an electric heater inside the hull and most probably have sped the curing up - but all in all it did work. None of my gluing came apart but I did also follow the fastening schedule set out in the plans (bought the silicon bronze fastening kit for the model). WEST suggests that you can go without the fasteners but I figured since I wasn't working in a "controlled environment" that the fasteners were important.
Graham

Yes, Plywood is "real" wood :)

A "professional" is someone who gets paid for their work - it doesn't necessarily mean they are good at it :)


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