HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Outboard designs up to 14'

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edfrompa
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HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Postby edfrompa » Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:10 pm

In an introductory post, I mentioned possible 2 1/2 HP on said skiff.
One responder suggested a 6 hp.
Want mine to be: #1 -row capable, #2 - outboard capable for moderate speed travel- not speed, #3 - electric trolling for our many (sometimes large) local lakes that don't allow gas.
Question 1: If speed not an issue, would the rowing hullform be preferable?
Question 2: Is there a "sweet spot" for power vs economy for this size/hullform? My inclination is toward lighter/slower but I recognize that there may be practical limits.
Question 3: Is a trolling motor type power practical for pt a to pt b travel ---i.e not trolling??
Any thoughts or direction most appreciated///Ed

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chugalug
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Re: HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Postby chugalug » Sun Oct 15, 2017 6:47 am

:D I like small motors too. however alot of those small ones don't have a reverse gear-they have 360 degree steering instead.I'm not sure how to hook one up remote steering .some of the 6 or bigger ones do have reverse.maybe the guy likes more power for heavier loads,I'm just fishing here. :D
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

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vupilot
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Re: HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Postby vupilot » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:59 pm

It depends on where you will use the boat. I think with electric unless you are on a very small lake it will take forever to get anywhere. You'll probably do 4-5 mph. If that is the goal then great.

With 2.5hp you'll be spending a lot of time at full power and even a 4 stroke is pretty loud when wound out. With say 6hp you have more options. Run half speed and enjoy quite, efficient running or use more throttle to beat the rain home, etc.

All of my boats have been 11-15 ft, two were skiffs, that experience is where my recommendation comes from.

edfrompa
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Re: HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Postby edfrompa » Sun Oct 15, 2017 1:13 pm

What you say makes sense - especially the part about running at/near full power. I'm past the stage where a throaty roar is required to announce my arrival.
Thanks, Ed

edfrompa
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Re: HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Postby edfrompa » Fri Oct 20, 2017 11:38 am

Recognize this is somewhat premature - just received my plans yesterday - but I see outboards listed as long/short shaft and wondered what the differences in application are??
Thinking of shopping used in the 6 HP range---funny afterthought--- after years of yak fishing, 4-5 kts is FLYING-LOL!!
Other than that, digesting plans VERY slowly and most happy about what I see.
Emerging concern--and maybe better posted in another thread-- is winter building in an unheated garage. Any insight would be most appreciated.

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vupilot
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Re: HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Postby vupilot » Fri Oct 20, 2017 6:55 pm

Short shaft is usually 15" and long shaft 20". It's measured from the cavitation plate above the prop to the mount of the motor where it rests on the transom. In the hp range of a boat like this you'll want to build for a short shaft which is what the plans were probably drawn as. But you can build for a long shaft by just making the center of the transom 5" higher.
https://www.smalloutboards.com/shaft.htm

You'll notice most epoxy states on the can a minimum temperature. Usually about 50 degrees or so. It will cure much slower at 50f than 70f. The viscosity will be thicker when cold as well.

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hoodman
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Re: HP for Power-Row 13 1/2" SB Skiff

Postby hoodman » Tue Oct 24, 2017 1:58 pm

I'm sure this will be a fun project! Regarding your unheated garage and building in the winter: I was able to build through the winter in an un-insulated garage in North Carolina. I did occasionally use a space heater to direct heat towards curing epoxy. If you can save up several things to glue up all at once you can minimize the amount of space heater use. I used a propane tank top heater while I was working but used much safer electric heat to help cure. You can also buy faster curing epoxy that will work better in the winter. If you store the epoxy inside your house it will be easier to mix as what vupilot says is correct, It will be much more viscous (difficult to pour and mix) when cold. Your mileage will vary based on your location and severity of your winters.


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