Shop size

Outboard designs up to 14'

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Jgg12002
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2015 5:53 am
Location: Monson ma

Shop size

Postby Jgg12002 » Sun Jul 15, 2018 12:58 pm

Shop size
Greetings I'm in awe on the craftsmanship happening from you folks it's truly inspiring and I'm back after a long wait and I'm looking into building a woody. My shop is only 14x9.5 so I was wondering if I could get away with building a flying saucer in it. I could take out the closet and get 16' but I'd rather not if I don't have to. Having built a 16' cedar strip kayak kitty corner in it sticking out the cellar door so I'm familiar with tight spaces. Is this feasible or should I be looking at a squirt? Respectfully John :D

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chugalug
Posts: 1195
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Shop size

Postby chugalug » Sun Jul 15, 2018 1:37 pm

:D Well,I built an 18ft longx 8 ft wide Bo-jest in a 12x 24 ft shed.Its tight but leaving wall studs exposed helped with some clamping issues.Also had higher ceiling rafters to lift hull from(2x10 rafters) :D
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

TomB
Posts: 282
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 4:07 pm
Location: Holland, MI

Re: Shop size

Postby TomB » Sun Jul 15, 2018 3:39 pm

Hey John,

That’s a tight one, tools, lumber, etc. stored someplace else I hope. Putting your build form on locking casters so you could slide from side to side and end to end seems like a must. It would give you more room where you’re working . Setting the build high so the shear is close to knee high (building further off the ground) would cut down on the “tailgate” requirement when you have to bend over. Could you wheel the build outside when you need more elbow room to put on the shear, chines, and side planking? Interesting challenge.

Tom

Jgg12002
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2015 5:53 am
Location: Monson ma

Re: Shop size

Postby Jgg12002 » Mon Jul 16, 2018 4:25 pm

Thanks for the replys gents
The advise was great casters sound like a great idea but getting outside to a semi flat area in my yard is a challenge. I was hoping to do much of the work during the winter so the outside thing isn't really great for me. Perhaps a squirt is the only way to go at best. I was hoping to do the major cutting first and make a kit then build after that. I have a small 10x10 area in my basement with a 8' bench for assembling frames and such but that's all I have.
Again thanks for the sound advise
Respectfully John

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mrintense
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Location: Austin, Texas
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Re: Shop size

Postby mrintense » Tue Jul 17, 2018 4:41 pm

Here's a consideration. Not sure of you live in an HOA controlled neighborhood or not, but a temporary shelter attached to your garage and closed off so that it can get any heat from a heater in your garage might be an option.

Admittedly this will probably only work if you live out in the rural areas where you can get away with this kind of thing.

I will say that working on a limited space is challenging and would suggest that bow out (with the option to move outside occasionally) will probably work better for hull construction. Once you flip, bow in gives you the option of climbing over the stern and til leave room to work on the majority of the boat.

I'm building a 21 foot cabin cruiser in a 21 foot (and a few inches) garage and my build form was locked in place. I had to make all kinds of ways up to do some of the hull construction that would have been much easier with more room at the bow (mine was built bow in).
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

Jgg12002
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2015 5:53 am
Location: Monson ma

Re: Shop size

Postby Jgg12002 » Sun Jul 22, 2018 4:44 am

getting outside to a flat area is a challenge. My shop is a half baked one car garage transformed into a regular room whith thankfully a 34" door. I could build it under a portable shelter during the warmer months but the climate control won't be great. And work leaves me exhausted during the busy summer months with my spine troubles so maybe I should wait until I retire and build it outside.
Thanks for all of your replys gents

Moeregaard
Posts: 354
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 11:31 pm
Location: Thousand Oaks, California

Re: Shop size

Postby Moeregaard » Sun Jul 22, 2018 6:10 am

We built our Zip in a one-car carport, with the fixture bonded to the concrete floor, and this didn't really present any problems. When I built two Can-Yaks in my one-car condo garage that also stores my power tools, things got much tighter. At any given time, one boat would occupy my living room while I worked on the other. What I have learned from all of this, is that neatness and organization become increasingly important as shop size decreases. Have your major power tools on wheels, break your build down into manageable tasks, and clean up every mess before moving on to the next phase of the project.

-Mark Shipley
A boat is just a wooden box with no right angles.


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