Zip SA Build

Outboard designs up to 14'

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david303
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue May 09, 2017 6:24 am

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by david303 »

A few pics of some of the progress.

I decided to learn to mill the timber instead of buying it pre milled, this added a fair amount of work to the build but it is a very satisfying job and a useful skill to learn how to use the jointer and then planer.
w2.jpg
thicness.jpg
Attachments
handwork.jpg

david303
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue May 09, 2017 6:24 am

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by david303 »

I have made some progress on the frames, slow progress but progress none the least. It is exciting once the big puzzle starts getting put together.
frame2.jpg
frame1.jpg
1.jpg

david303
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue May 09, 2017 6:24 am

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by david303 »

I have enjoyed the frame process a fair bit, I have a few time lapses as well, will try put them together into a video...
IMG-20200315-WA0002.jpeg
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Roberta
Posts: 6628
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 5:23 pm
Location: East Troy, Wisconsin

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by Roberta »

Rich and I would get setup for weekends of wood work resawing, planing, and ripping all the sizes we needed. It was fun teamwork and yielded what we wanted. I think the planer paid for itself with savings in labor and travel to wood shops. I was able to better select wood I wanted to book match for decking. Our Laguna 14 SUV bandsaw with the 1 inch Resaw King blade was awesome for splitting big boards.

Have fun!!!

Roberta :D
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

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Andy Garrett
Posts: 1352
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:44 pm
Location: Nampa, Idaho

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by Andy Garrett »

I think if I were to build another Zip, I would build the single gusseted frame (original).

The boat is so over strength as designed, it's amazing. A fact I have shared many times herein: When I flipped mine and drug it up on the trailer (where I did all the top side work). I was crawling around in there, all over the hull, while it sat on four bunks. You would think such rough treatment would be damaging, but the boat never even creaked. Not once...

I've never lived in a house built as strong as my boat, and I'm a lousy carpenter.

Yep. I'd go single gusset between overlapping frames, but that's me.
Andy Garrett

Perhaps the slowest Zip build in Glen-L history...

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Roberta
Posts: 6628
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 5:23 pm
Location: East Troy, Wisconsin

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by Roberta »

Like this? I thought it was easier than doing to double gusset.

Roberta :D
Attachments
Zip frames 004.JPG
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

david303
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue May 09, 2017 6:24 am

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by david303 »

Good to know the strength factor.

I went with double gussets- but I am planning a utility layout so the extra strength is welcome. The epoxy is drying quicker than expected. Even though it is well into Autumn here the tin roof with no insulation in the afternoon makes the workshop warm which I think is making it work faster. Can't contact the local suppliers to check.

The rest seems to be going well, pretty much smooth sailing this side, learning a lot which is a win.
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Form is up, will notch the frames and it looks like I have enough wood to start with the keel as well, we still have 3 weeks of lockdown to go minimum so I may have to revert back to fixing the house.

I have a boat load of pics and timelapse videos and photos, might put it into a short clip to make it more manageable to view.

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sproggy
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:04 pm
Location: Welwyn Garden City, UK

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by sproggy »

Ambient temperature has a huge effect on speed of cure of epoxy. I have both slow and fast (West) hardeners and use one or the other depending upon the temperature and what I'm working on - whether it's a short or long process. Generally slow hardener in the summer when my garage gets like an oven and I have to work really fast before the epoxy starts going off. Fast hardener in the colder months when it can take hours to cure. I've got more confident mixing slow/fast hardeners too, which allows you to adjust cure times.

I had bad experiences using slow hardener for encapsulating the frames - it gives more time for gassing so you get more bubbles. So best stick with fast hardener and do encapsulation in the evenings when the temperature is dropping and there's no gas coming out of the timber.

hoodman
Posts: 2491
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by hoodman »

I would recommend encapsulating the frames now if you can still get them off the form to lay them flat. It's a lot easier. Yes and as was stated do it in falling temps for the first coat.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=25139

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sproggy
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:04 pm
Location: Welwyn Garden City, UK

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by sproggy »

+1 on encapsulating now.

Something else worth doing before you attach the frames to the setup members is tapering the tops of the main members down towards where frame 5 1/2 rests. This has to happen before you 'plank' the bottom. I did it after I'd mounted the frames and done the chines and sheers and it's a very awkward job with all those things in place. Well it was with the tools I had available anyway.

david303
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue May 09, 2017 6:24 am

Re: Zip SA Build

Post by david303 »

thanks for the input.

At this stage with access to materials pretty much impossible I am going to be limited in further progress. I have some epoxy to seal a few frames so I may do that.

I have one board which I can maybe rip to do the keel but other than that I am sitting dead in the water without materials. I guess there is always sanding that can be done...

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