Plans for a castor wheeled building platform

Outboard designs up to 14'

Moderator: ttownshaw

Post Reply
chappo1970
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:13 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Plans for a castor wheeled building platform

Post by chappo1970 » Tue Sep 04, 2007 8:19 pm

Thought that this may help those that are planning to build their boat on a castor wheeled platform. I have seen other builders on this forum using the same type of rig but I found no plans for these rigs.

I have a workshop with enough space for the project but the idea of bolting the project down for the duration of the build didn't tickle my fancy one bit. I wanted to be able to move it around when I needed to.

I built it from some aluminium that I had spare from another project however it could be easily adapted to steel and or timber. I used the aluminium to save on weight but the choice is ultimately yours. Also the dimension can be changed to suit your circumstance (garage size)/budget and project. If building in timber substitute plate for ply, external angle to say 2"x4" and so on.

The purpose of the external angle and bracing plates are to keep the rig square and true under all circumstances. I MIG welded the entire frame and fully bead welded the plates. Probably over kill I know but better safe than sorry. I suggest that you make at least two of the castor wheels the locking type to stop it sliding around the place. I used solid steel wheels as I wanted a rigid platform that when placed in the same spot would be level and true without the need to relevel and stuff around. The platform in the photos is 3m x 3m or 10' x 10'. I made it that big as I plan to move on from the squirt and build the Renegade 21' and then the Riviera 23'. I will post more photos once I have built the form so you can see how it goes together.

Built the wheeled platform last weekend in an endevour to feel like I was moving forward on my squirt project. I am moving this week to my new abode so there was little point starting the build until after the move. Mind you the wife was not impressed I built it as its another thing to be moved LOL! She won't be doing the lifting anyway thats my job!

Image

Image

Image

Hope this helps my fellow boat builders. If you have questions feel free to drop me an email or post to this topic.
"There is nothing that duct tape cannot fix."

User avatar
Dave Grason
Posts: 3762
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 5:19 am
Location: Lake Barkley, KY

Post by Dave Grason » Tue Sep 04, 2007 9:07 pm

It doesn't look level in the above shots. Will that effect the boat's final outcome?
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

chappo1970
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:13 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Post by chappo1970 » Tue Sep 04, 2007 9:28 pm

Looks level to me! Maybe you need stand on one foot Dave
"There is nothing that duct tape cannot fix."

User avatar
Dave Grason
Posts: 3762
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 5:19 am
Location: Lake Barkley, KY

Post by Dave Grason » Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:07 am

If I did that I'd probably have a difficult time walking straight. I'd probably only walk in circles. lol

Ok all kidding aside, the design looks very good and I've been studying your drawings. I'm gonna build one of these for myself because this will be a real problem solver. I had thought about going ahead and building the trailer for my Zip but getting in and out of the boat would be a real hassle. This will keep everything lower to the ground and make interior work way easier.

Tell me if I'm looking at it correctly though. With this design, you could space your bunks wider or narrower to allow it to be used with a variety of smallish boats. Then clamp down the bunks and you're good to go. Is this what you were thinking?
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

boat-bill-der
Posts: 332
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 3:26 pm
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Contact:

Post by boat-bill-der » Wed Sep 05, 2007 8:49 am

That looks great! I wish I had a welder...

The only thing I would think about is when you have to exert alot of force when springing chines/sheers, planing, sanding, planking?Is the whole form going to roll?

I had mine bolted into concrete, and it still wasn't stable enough for me at times...I would think you would need to find something more than just locking casters.

I think I saw someone had the wheels off the ground so that when you lift one end of the form, it tilts down onto the wheels so that you can push it like a wheelbarrow...Maybe that coupled with a removable floor bolt would be more stable?

chappo1970
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:13 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Post by chappo1970 » Wed Sep 05, 2007 3:04 pm

Exactly Dave. I was planning to clamp and or tek screw them in place (depending on how much the clamps got in the way).

Also the bracing plates act as a platform to stand on when working over the boat, thats why I made mine a little wider. I am bitten by the building bug and I plan to build a few boats hence why I went to the expense to make the rig.

Good Point Bill. This is why I like posting this stuff, you guys can see future problems from your experiences.

As you suggested, I would think if movement became an issue, I could use a couple of Ramset Loxin eye bolts into the floor and use a couple of turnbuckles to "chain" the rig down temporarily while you were at that stage of the build. The Ramset Loxin system is basically a sleave and a bolt that can be removed and replaced at will. I have used these to bolt down machinery in factories before where they think they may need to move it for one reason or another. They work incrediably well in this application.

Image

see this site for full details http://www.ramset.com.au/public/article ... 3&menuNo=0

I was toying with the idea of rigging up a rotissory type arrangement, like used in car body shops. What do think? Going to far?
"There is nothing that duct tape cannot fix."

User avatar
steve crawford
Posts: 392
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 6:55 pm
Location: K.C. MO.

Post by steve crawford » Wed Sep 05, 2007 3:19 pm

Rolling carts are great. I originaly made one to work on a jet ski. High enough to pull on and off the trailer.

After I got the plywood on the hull of my TNT we fliped it over on to this cart, which is carpet paded.

Image

Then to finish and paint bottm flip it back over. Keeps the boat tall enough not to kill you're back.

Image

I can move the boat back on this cart to finish my trailer one of these days.

boat-bill-der
Posts: 332
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 3:26 pm
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Contact:

Post by boat-bill-der » Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:00 pm

Wow. Looks like you got it all figured out...I wish I had those when I secured mine I had a heck of a time bolting into my concrete with some other expanding bolts where you hit the center pin to expand the little flanges inside the hole.

I also liked having my hull higher when building it upside down so I could get underneath if I needed to. Then when I flipped it over, I cut the rails off my building form, flipped em over and used it as a lower cradle so I could get in and out easier to build the cockpit.

Looks like you will be able to easly transform it accordingly. Rotisserie might be a little much, but would be interesting to see!

chappo1970
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:13 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Post by chappo1970 » Wed Sep 05, 2007 6:59 pm

Bill I know the ones and they are a pain in the a**. I would hope being in construction for 20 years I would have picked something up of use LOL!!! :oops:

Steve I am with you. Like how you used 4 swivel castors as well. Did the narrow cart effect the stability at all?

Any ideas of a good height to set your form as Bill suggested?
"There is nothing that duct tape cannot fix."

J Patroni
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:20 pm
Location: Cape May, NJ & 1000 Islands, NY

Post by J Patroni » Thu Sep 06, 2007 4:34 am

Dave Grason,

Go ahead and build the trailer, just don't put the axel under it until
you are ready to hit the road.

Why build 2 rolling units. You can put small moving dollies under it
initially.
If you don't build it now, You will regret it later! Already regreting it

Crackerbox Build
http://s232.photobucket.com/albums/ee255/jtpatronimfg/

Checkmate Restoration
http://s232.photobucket.com/albums/ee25 ... 0Starflite

User avatar
steve crawford
Posts: 392
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 6:55 pm
Location: K.C. MO.

Post by steve crawford » Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:17 am

The cart is real stable the padded rails are 2' apart and 48''long and it sets 2' off the floor.

chappo1970
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:13 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Post by chappo1970 » Thu Sep 06, 2007 4:14 pm

Agree with above. Leave the axel off and set the trailer on castors.
"There is nothing that duct tape cannot fix."

Post Reply

Return to “Small outboards”