Help! rig my tunnel mite!

Outboard designs up to 14'

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sarge
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2008 1:17 pm

Help! rig my tunnel mite!

Post by sarge »

About ten years ago I built a tunnel mite and it has sat dormant in the garage ever since. This winter I finally bought a yamato 102 and need help rigging it but first I needs parts, where can I go to order the steering and throttle parts I will need to finish the job?

Second question. I couldn't stand the transom design so I have a 3" thick transom which I now see is too wide for the stock motor mount. Will I need to shave the transom or is there an adaptor so I can set it back like I see many of the fast ourboards doing?

thanks for any help you can give..

Jerry[/b]

upspirate

Post by upspirate »

I would just use a hole saw a bit bigger than the round part of the motor clamps & cut into the inside of the transom the depth you would need to be able to fit the motor onto.Then use a router from that depth & create slots up to the top of the transom so that the motor will slide down & clamp.

If you want to try a bracket,here is a site that has plans for one:

http://www.dillon-racing.com/jackplate/index.htm

Hope this helps

Warren

HouTexBBC
Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2005 3:12 pm
Location: Houston, Texas
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Post by HouTexBBC »

I think the jack plate is probably the best way to go. You will likely get better performance from your engine using a jack plate on that tunnel mite anyway. The link upspirate gave is a good one. I am actually building the Dillon Mini right now and plan to build that jack plate for it as well.

As for parts for the yamato just search the net. There are places. Two places I have found for good racing hardware are Portage Bay Systems http://www.portagebaysystems.com/marine/ and Sorenson Marine http://www.boatracingr11.com/Sorensen_b ... re_acc.htm

Dennis

sarge
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2008 1:17 pm

Post by sarge »

Thanks, I'll check them out. Does the jack plate allow you to lower the engine enough that I won't have to cut off 4.5 inches from my transom? the Yamato has a much shorter shaft than what must be normally riged on a tunnel mite.

Jerry

PS the Dillon does look cool.

HouTexBBC
Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2005 3:12 pm
Location: Houston, Texas
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Post by HouTexBBC »

I think the Dillon homemade jack plate gives you 3.5 to 4 inches of vertical movement, but look at the plans and see if you think it can be made to give more. You can also set the jack plate where ever you want on the back of the transom to start with, so perhaps you start it off at a mid level position and then you have the ability to go up or down a little as needed. Or something along those lines.

Dennis

sarge
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2008 1:17 pm

Post by sarge »

thanks for the help, sounds like I'll be building a jack plate.

Jerry

sarge
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2008 1:17 pm

Post by sarge »

Hey, HouTexBBC- thanks for the links, that was exactly what I needed.

Jerry

HouTexBBC
Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2005 3:12 pm
Location: Houston, Texas
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Post by HouTexBBC »

Oh, also, if you don't feel like making a jack plate they can be purchased but they tend to be expensive, like $200. If you make one, look on ebay for the 4x4 x 1/4 aluminum angle. It runs about $10.00 a foot. Have to look a while to find the right size

Dennis

upspirate

Post by upspirate »

Sarge,
I would think that you'd have to check the clearance at the front of the motor to the transom to determine if the setback of the jack plate will be enough to be able to mount the plate low enough to compensate for a high transom.

Doesn't seem like too much problem though to just run a circular saw or saber saw across the top of the transom to cut the proper height though!

sarge
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2008 1:17 pm

Post by sarge »

Hey I thought I would update you. I built the Dillon jack plate but cut down the front 4"where the motor mounts, this enables the prop shaft top be about 1" below the sponson and I have up to 6" of vertical lift if needed.

The way I got more vertical was to drill a series of holes that the slide side can be mounted to. In the down position (4" below the top of the transom) I still have about 1/2" of clearance to the bottom of the power head.

Thanks, Bob Dillon for the great, easy and professional design he came up with. For about $100 retail I built the thing.

looking forward to ordering the steering and throttle components next week!


Jerry

upspirate

Post by upspirate »

Yea!!!Congrates Jerry!!! :D

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