a week on the water in an incomplete boat?

Outboard designs up to 14'

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jamietyson
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a week on the water in an incomplete boat?

Post by jamietyson »

So I'd like to have my Bingo in the water for vacation on the first week of August. It's a stitch and glue boat so I don't doubt it'll look like a boat by then and it'll probably even float! I just doubt that I'll have all the time and money needed to glass the entire outside and paint it before then.

How much damage am I going to do if I don't glass the entire exterior before vacation and the boat spends a week in the water without any UV protection? I would at least biaxial tape the seams and try to keep it covered when not in use. I can take the time to finish it correctly later but I want to know if this is an option if I run out of build time.

thanks again, sorry to drop in once in a while and not really contribute. I guess it's tough to contribute when you don't know much of anything!

jamie

upspirate

Post by upspirate »

I would not do this unless you wish to ruin all your hard work & throw away money& your project
The wood will soak up the water & cause all sorts of problems!!!!

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leakcheck
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Post by leakcheck »

I personally feel that glassing it is the quick part !!

STeve

jamietyson
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Post by jamietyson »

so even if it's epoxied all over I shouldn't put it in the water without glass on the outside?

I have never glassed a boat so I didn't know it was the quick part. I guess that's good news!

What about UV light protection? Will one week under the sun destroy the epoxy?

jamie

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BruceDow
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Post by BruceDow »

A couple of quick coats of varnish will give you UV protection.
Bruce.

~~ Do what you love, and love what you do. ~~
~~ To me - only my boat is not yet perfect. Everybody else's is to be admired for I know the path they have walked (Dave Lott, 2010) ~~
Dow's Monaco Project

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kens
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Post by kens »

Depends what your definition of the quick part of glassing is.
If you want it to look rough, then glassing can be quick. However, if you want it slick, smooth, and glossy, then the glassing is one of the most demanding parts of the build.

upspirate

Post by upspirate »

I didn't realize you had put epoxy over it...I thought you meant bare wood!!! :roll:

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leakcheck
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Post by leakcheck »

Boy that is tough one. I wouldn't do it but ./......

If everything is saturated
If you do not LEAVE it in the water (pull it out after each days use)
If you have it covered to protect it from the sun while sitting out
If you do not gouge the wood at all


IF you do all that, and maybe some other things I cannot think of, you might be alright, BUT I would feel much better if you glassed it and filled the weave and put a coat of primer on it (Or varnish if it is natural look you are after)

Steve

But: As my dad always told me: "If 'ifs' and 'buts' were candy and nuts everyday would be Christmas !"


But then: My grandmother rented little row boats that we made of some time of planked wood and plywood bottoms (not marine) and painted with a latex house paint and they sat in the water year after year without being repainted (In NH..short season) so who am I to tell ya? :roll:

jamietyson
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Post by jamietyson »

OK, sounds like I should at least get the glass on the boat. Let's say it's a 13 foot long runabout with a reasonable amount of top decking but less than the bingo usually has. How long might it take to glass the entire exterior of the boat and make it smooth enough to do a coat or two of white hull paint?

I may paint it using a turbine spray rig...hoping that'll go quickly.

jamie

Drew
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Post by Drew »

you could do it over a weekend.. if you dont sand.. if you want to sand it all smooth and pretty itll take longer.. it matters what amount of effort you want to put into it

jamietyson
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Post by jamietyson »

I talked to Barry at Southern Polyurethanes today and explained my situation. He said just use two coats of whatever inexpensive single stage urethane I can get my hands on...the epoxy will do all the dirty work and for a boat that doesn't live in the water most of the year it'll be just fine. He said for really high speed boats it's a different story but in his experience the problem isn't the paint used on a hull, it's the prep and not following directions for a given product.

The advantage of using a simple single stage is that it's compatible with other systems if I want to come back later and change the color or do more glass work. I'll only have to spray enough to cover my glasswork and epoxy and I can always come back later and fix any imperfections without worry. Correctly sanded epoxy and urethane stick together really nicely.

I know SPI single stage base colors cover really well and are designed to spray "as finished." If I do two coats of single stage white (sprayed correctly) I probably won't have to sand, especially considering the goal is to get it in the water, not to make it perfect. It'll also spray out nicely in one evening- let the first coat flash dry for 30 minutes to an hour then spray the next coat.

I think I know where I'm headed now.

jamie

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Caber-Feidh
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Post by Caber-Feidh »

leakcheck wrote:I personally feel that glassing it is the quick part !!

STeve
Is this from experience? :wink:


Fun parts, building frame, setting up mechanicals, enjoying the results.
parts I thought drag on forever: glassing, sanding, glassing, sanding, and oh, yes, glasssing and sanding. The easiest way to get a disappointing product is all in the glass. and for some reason, what looked great the night before looks like trash the next day. (beer goggles maybe?)

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leakcheck
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Post by leakcheck »

(Caber: remember I used to work for a fiberglass manufacturer and wholesaler...so..TO ME the glass part was the easy part !! )

Even that with limited experience...if the hull is near perfect when you get to the glass stage it seems to me that the glass practically "falls" on...wet it out, cover the weave...I mean..simple !!!...

OKay, I know I know..you guys want me to prove it...you are egging me on to actually build a boat eh??? I think I am getting the message... :roll:

Steve

(I kinda built a boat if you call my little tug boat a boat ! :oops: Hey it is glassed completely !!!)

Matter of fact, I think the glassing part went so well I don't remember having to sand at all !! 8)

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Mr Hot Rod
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Post by Mr Hot Rod »

I'd skip the paint and use a 2-component immersion service rated epoxy primer.
This can be sanded and topcoated at a later date . . . Our automotive paint supplier
tweaked us onto Polyval Polyur Epoxy Primer. It's an industrial-duty non-sanding primer
which can be used below the waterline. It's not a primer-surfacer, so don't expect
high film build with this product.
More info at : http://www.polyvalcoatings.com/eng/index.html

Click here to see how our hull was prepped and the product was applied.
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Building the Glen-L Hot Rod : http://www.boats.chelseacoachworks.com

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