where chine meets frames

Outboard designs up to 14'

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cusoak
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Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Senecaville Ohio

where chine meets frames

Post by cusoak »

Now I am back for some more help. Starting at the transom and going forward. Frame 2 chine landing looks like nothing needs to be done there?. Frame 4 chine landing seems as though it needs alot of faring on the bow side to allow for a natural curve to take place to get you to frame 5.5 ? The same seems to have to happen on frame 5.5 ? then some sort of a compound angle will have to be cut on chine where it attaches to the stem.? Is there some distance from the breasthook that the chine is supposted to contact the stem.?
Hope that all made sence
Thanks Jeff

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vupilot
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Re: where chine meets frames

Post by vupilot »

I found the same thing on my frame notches. Nothing much on frame 2, angled frame 4 slightly toward the bow so the chine fits flat against the notch. Frame 5.5, lots of angle toward the stem and frame 5.5 side members as well need to be angled.

The chine will naturally fall somewhere on the stem as you bend it forward. Look at the pics in the "customer photos" section of this site and compare where yours falls to others. Its not critical, you just don't want it extremely near the breasthook or extremely high.
The nearer it is to the breasthook the more difficult the forward bottom planking will be to bend down to meet the chine/stem.

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AaronStJ
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Location: Seattle

Re: where chine meets frames

Post by AaronStJ »

vupilot wrote: The chine will naturally fall somewhere on the stem as you bend it forward. Look at the pics in the "customer photos" section of this site and compare where yours falls to others. Its not critical, you just don't want it extremely near the breasthook or extremely high.
These photos might be somewhat instructive: http://www.glen-l.com/picboards/picboard9/pic519a.htm. Chines land where they land, from what I can tell. In the forward few feet of the boat for most builds the planking is actual fairly smooth from the keel to the sheer, no matter where the chine is. As long as it is a sweet, fair curve, the actual landing point of the chine has more to do with what the wood wants to do.

This photo certainly put my mind at ease a bit:
Image

John K
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Re: where chine meets frames

Post by John K »

Where you land the chine can make a big different in how the boat looks, as Aaron photos shows.

The flying sauce had a dimension for where the chine meets. Yes it does meant a compound cut. I clamped the chine in pace along the frames with plenty left at the transom. Made the cut and fit it in place. If cut was wrong. I had enought to slide it forward and cut again.

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