Matthias Wandel's homemade bandsaw build

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Canoath
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: Riverina, NSW, Australia

Re: Matthias Wandel's homemade bandsaw build

Postby Canoath » Mon Nov 05, 2012 6:53 am

I wasn't going to do any work on the bsaw till Wednesday or Thrusday but when the local guy said my blade arrived and work rang to say a packaged arrived (second bsaw blade from carbatec) I had to try them out. Also bought my first japanese saw from carbatec to make most of the postage. Man those things are good, I can see myself getting more.

$538+
$21 bsaw blade, 6tpi 10 x 2680mm
$17 11 x 1225mm v belt
$20 pulley
$12 various washers, spacers screws and a couple of bolts
$16 14" inner tubes
=$624

The sundries and mistakes makes the real total a bit more ofcourse. Some include a second pulley I probably wont use for $20, around $40 on two v belts that were too short due to miscalculations on my part, but I'll keep em. The first bsaw blade that's 4tpi 13 x 2665mm cost $50 and is too short. I shaved a few mm under the top mount to try and get it to fit but it wouldn't hop on. I could persevere and keep slicing off mm from the bottom of the top mount but for the moment I'll leave it. The 2680mm are a common size for a brand bsaw that carbatec sell and they stock a bunch of different blades to suit. I also wasted around $27 on inner tubes. I mistakenly bought two 16" thorn proof tubes at first. Too bulky I thought but may revisit them one day. A normal 14" tube split in two whilst trying to stretch it over the bottom wheel and when I went to buy a replacement I once again mistakenly got a thorn proof tube but at least 14". I used it on the bottom and it's fine, less bulky than the 16" tubes.

The only advice I'd offer is to space out the drive pulley from the bottom wheel as advised by Matthias. I neglected to, thinking it would be alright. But as v belts seem to come in either 11mm or 13mm widths, I was planning on using the later size just for percieved extra strength. But it's unuseable on mine due to the belt scraping against the inner tube. 11mm comes close but works fine. It would be good to have a little more breathing space though.

The 1/3hp motor is a pain. Although it can be pursuaded in either direction by hand just as it starts, most of the time it resists and goes the wrong way for the bsaw. Even when the wheels are spun up correctly by hand then the motor powered up, sometimes it'll kick the other way. There is a sweet spot, or a point where it is at a stall when turned on. From there a wheel can be easily pushed the correct way and the motor will come up to speed quickly. I'll have to mark the pulley and motor where that stall spot is. Also the motor's only temporarily attached at the moment with a clamp and blocking. Doesn't look too secure but it is. It seems powerful enough too but I'll be looking foward to putting a new motor on.

During the first spin up with blade tensioned, I used spring clamps on either end of both axles to keep wheels and axles in check, but there was a knock and bearing noise consistent with the wheels spinning and seemed to only come from the bottom wheel. For the second spin up I used wooden clamps on the rear of the axles and drilled, tapped and screwed retaining washers onto the front of the axles. This eliminated any abnormal noise from the wheels and/or bearings. I ran the thing for about 10 mins or so. However long it took to drink a beer basically, looking and listening for anything abnormal but all seems good. Next thing I'll do is work on the guides and temporary table so I can start cutting some of the other stuff, trunions, covers etc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ElKTO7MKow
Building a Malahini.......one day

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Canoath
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: Riverina, NSW, Australia

Re: Matthias Wandel's homemade bandsaw build

Postby Canoath » Sat Nov 30, 2013 9:22 pm

Well, a mere 12 months passes and finally some progress. The Wandelsaw is up and running. 8)

When I left the build my two main concerns related to the motor and it's tendency to spin the wrong way most of the time when powered up, plus I wasn't too sure how I was going to replicate the blade guides and trunions. I set aside the project and went about refurbing my shed instead. Before I set about a boat build the shed needed to be organised, lined, insulated and somewhat soundproofed so I can work into late hours without upsetting anyone. The shed's a little under half done and when I ran out of drywall sheets in early November I noticed the bandsaw and thought I really should give it a new motor and finish it off.

I started by stripping the BS of the motor and wheels and built a stand out of pine plus a tassie oak base.
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I gave the plans a quick once over then put them aside. I couldn't do the trunions and guides the way Matthias did without a BS and some other tools so I decided to cobble up items on the fly and piece them together. I retapped the threads in the shafts first to take bigger bolts rather than the screws I originally had in place then worked on the guides and supports.
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Next came the table, made from two different sized layers of film face ply and hinged with brass hinges. I don't have a mechanism to adjust and hold angles yet and I'm considering doing the trunions as per plans at a later date but right now, perpendicular cuts is all I'm after and the current setup, guides and all is working really well, even if a little less refined than what the plans dictate and what others have built.
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The new motor, a 1400 rpm 1hp unit is brilliant. Really happy with this unit and cost $100 and even with another $102 shipping was less than a unit I could buy locally.
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The table got a slot and fence put it in. Fairly rudimentary despite all the effort I went to to make it square, I haven't really used it. I much prefer to follow a straight line though that may change when I get into ripping planks and veneers.
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The enclosure was next, hinged top and the lower piece slides back. Both are held closed by magnet latches.
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The stand, which is on lockable castors and has a 12mm marine ply base has now got the sides and rear covered with ply and mdf at the rear. Just have to figure out what to do with the front. Currently I'm clamping some 5mm mdf panel and have a vac hose to the back so dust collects in the stand. I'm working on some permanent solution for dust collection but still in the planning/experimental stages.
Building a Malahini.......one day

User avatar
Canoath
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: Riverina, NSW, Australia

Re: Matthias Wandel's homemade bandsaw build

Postby Canoath » Sat Nov 30, 2013 10:34 pm

And now, how does it perform. Love it.

Over the past week or so I cut up some panel, pine and hardwood, but only little pieces that anything could cut. I wont post that stuff. What I really was interested to see was how much could it handle regarding thickness and hardness of timber with the intention of milling suitable sized timber for boats plus other projects. Not to mention cutting frames and so forth.

I found pretty soon that the one thing that made a huge diffference in making straight cuts was to ensure the blade was sharp. When a new 5/8"-16mm 3tpi blade arrived I set about ripping some 5" ironbark from an old railway sleeper/tie and found the blade wander, usually following the grain and impossible to counteract. I watched some videos, read some tips and found the two most helpful videos to be a presentation by Alex Snodgrass from Carter products and by "Brandotown" who posted a video about sharpening new blades. I figured tensioning and tracking of the blade was fine and it came down to how sharp the teeth were. I touched up each tooth with a bench grinder as shown in the Brandotown vid and man, what a difference. Prior to sharpening the teeth felt sharp enough but wouldn't bite the wood without a lot of force.

The video below is in two parts. First up I'm ripping and cross cutting with my original 3/8"(10mm) 6tpi blade. The timber (I think) Vic Ash, I recovered from my old workbench which was approx 30yrs old, built from heavy steel pipe posts and angle frame with 28 metres of this 8"x2" rough sawn lumber covering the top and lower shelf. I dressed this piece with a No4 handplane and was surprised how well it came up. I plan on using it when I build another workbench but I don't know now. It looks too good.

The second part of the video shows the new 5/8" resharpened blade in action on a one metre long piece of green Eucalyptus (don't know what species, maybe box) but it's a hardwood and damn heavy though not as much as the iron bark but more so than vic ash. Just like the ironbark, this blade wandered at first and even stalled the motor a couple of times. After I sharpened the new blade, no more problems.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZxQ-FcuvNQ

This is the green log. I had to hand cut or trim some of the nodes down before the bs could attack it.
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Firewood or usable lumber ?? Whatever they turn out to be it was fun getting to this point. I really need to make an infeed and outfeed table or have rollers plus a sled for milling if I continue this. Not only is the timber heavy it'll help with accuracy of cuts.
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Some redgum scrap as well
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Building a Malahini.......one day


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