Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

Moderator: BruceDow

Paul Kinneberg
Posts: 73
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 6:36 pm
Location: Zimmerman, MN

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Paul Kinneberg »

Carl
I have been following your blog and saw your update today. One thing of note was your intension to use 11 -12" wide boards. Couple of observations for you. First most lumber yards charge a premium for boards that wide. Second be sure to watch the grain as you can get cupping on wider boards if not close to quarter sawn. Look forward to future posts.
Paul

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Paul Kinneberg wrote:Carl
I have been following your blog and saw your update today. One thing of note was your intension to use 11 -12" wide boards. Couple of observations for you. First most lumber yards charge a premium for boards that wide. Second be sure to watch the grain as you can get cupping on wider boards if not close to quarter sawn. Look forward to future posts.
Paul

Thanks for the heads up Paul.

Actually I may end up going with 9" wide. I made a few parts from scrap lumber today and need to re-evaluate my layout patterns. I am going to do that tonight. Either way, I intend on inspecting the lumber personally before taking delivery so I will definitely keep an eye out for cupping or warping, and also for splits (splits and delamination of plywood got me on the last batch because I wasn't careful enough)
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Well most of this week has been doing other things but the time I did spend on the boat was spent cutting out and sanding the stem pieces to final shape. I've also rough cut the breast hook parts but still need to final sand them. Sanding the frame parts was a lot of work, but these parts were harder because they are bigger and more unwieldy. I'm sitting here at the computer nursing a sore back. Should be okay by tomorrow and I can continue on more sanding. But at least the stems are completed.
Stem-Rough Cut.jpg
Stem-Sanding to Shape.jpg
Yours Truly - Sanding Boat Stem.jpg
The plan is to finish the breasthook parts next, then layout and sand the remaining frame parts(frames 1, 2, and transom)
Once that's done, I will be starting on the building form
I will also be getting ready to assemble all the frame parts, but I will probably wait on that until it warms up a bit.

Hmmm. I just noticed that a few of the last posts I made are missing from the forum. Must have something to do with that last glitch they had a few days ago.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
Bill Edmundson
Posts: 12054
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 6:45 am
Location: Birmingham, AL, USA
Contact:

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Bill Edmundson »

Carl

We lost a few post. Don't worry too much about the outside of the stem. You will fair away a lot of it.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Short update;

Continuing to sand parts to final shape. I've also started cutting out the remaining frame parts.

No new pictures to show this time.

However, I have finally decided on a name for my boat. How I came to a decision on this is described in my blog. The name will be "Some Other Time".

I'll try to get some new pictures this weekend.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Another update.

I completed making all the main frame parts I had remaining and then I cut the transom angle. Cutting the angle was cool and worked out perfectly. Basically I angled the blade on my table saw. I attached two pieces of wood to the fence and slid that up to the blade. A third piece of wood attached to the frame at a specific distance controlled the depth of the cut .Of course I practiced on scrap first to make sure I got it right. And I was definitely nervous making that first real cut.

My blog has more details on the actual process but here is a couple of images
20130219_204829.jpg
20130219_212631.jpg
20130219_212655.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

And some more
20130220_193717.jpg
20130220_193810.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

So coming up will be cutting the notches for the transom battens. Since that edge is cut at an angle, the notches will need to be cut at an angle as well.

I'm trying to figure out some type of tooling that I can do this with a router., but I am open to suggestions.

I've still got to make a few more gussets and then everything will get a finish sanding before assembly. I want the parts to be nice and smooth before assembly so when I encapsulate them, the were be no major roughness on the parts.

For me, this is an exiting time, It's starting to get real for me as I complete more parts. Sure my pace is slow, but it's the journey for me so I'm not concerned.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
Lowka53
Posts: 1938
Joined: Fri May 14, 2010 11:47 pm
Location: Ogden, Utah-Jubilee build
Contact:

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Lowka53 »

you should be able to do this with your router with out any jigs just place your router foot on the board matching the angle and out out the area.
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
http://www.facebook.com/Home.Made.Boat.Building
Bon Voyage-"Wild Flower" 40' house boat being built
14' Mr John-being built
32' Supper Huck-in design

Rod H

potnol
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:34 pm
Location: Hasselt,Belgium

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by potnol »

I have posted this already but the post was removed.

What do you think that the wait will be on trailer ?

Do you plan to use a mercruiser 3.0 I/O ?

Greatings

User avatar
rbrandenstein
Posts: 848
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 3:51 pm
Location: O'Fallon, MO

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by rbrandenstein »

Carl,
What I did to cut the bottom notches in the transom frame was set the depth of my table saw to the notch depth and them made repeated cuts holding the frame piece at the transom angle. If the bottom is already cut at the angle, just hold this firm to table. You can either cut it completely out or make fewer cuts and break out the remainder, trimming it up with a chisel.

The keel notch needs a little jig to hold the top level yet maintain the angle. Your keel may have a lamination of plywood, so the depth of cut needs adjusting to account for this and the jig, etc.
________________
Bob
Completed Malahini (launched 6/24/2012)
http://bobsboatbuild.blogspot.com/

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

potnol wrote:I have posted this already but the post was removed.

What do you think that the wait will be on trailer ?

Do you plan to use a mercruiser 3.0 I/O ?
I remember the posting and I did answer however, that was during the time when some of the forum postings were lost.

I haven't got a good answer for the weight on the trailer other than a guess of approximately 3000 pound. But I really don't know nor do I have any previous experience to draw upon. The hull weight is listed at 1200 pounds. I intend to weigh my parts and equipment as I install them on the boat and try to get a figure that is relatively close. This will also help with the weight and balance of the boat.

My original intention was to use the Mercruiser 3.0 with an I/O and I may still go that route. However, lately I have been leaning more towards an outboard. The installation is less complex and it will leave more room in the aft cabin. I used to think it would cost more but I am not so sure about that anymore either. The other concern I have is that the inboard setup will weigh more and I do not want my boat sitting tail down in the water.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
mrintense
Posts: 3821
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:22 am
Location: Austin, Texas
Contact:

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

rbrandenstein wrote:Carl,
What I did to cut the bottom notches in the transom frame was set the depth of my table saw to the notch depth and them made repeated cuts holding the frame piece at the transom angle. If the bottom is already cut at the angle, just hold this firm to table. You can either cut it completely out or make fewer cuts and break out the remainder, trimming it up with a chisel.

The keel notch needs a little jig to hold the top level yet maintain the angle. Your keel may have a lamination of plywood, so the depth of cut needs adjusting to account for this and the jig, etc.
I've considered this approach as well as using a router. All the ideas I came up for a tool for the router were overly complicated. I was trying to justify it in my mind that I would have many such notches to cut, but so far I'm not nuts about using the tool ideas I've come up with.

I am a little afraid to cut them on the table saw for fear of ruining the part. The part is only 3/4 inch thick and I am afraid that it will rock back and forth as I move it through the blade.

However, it occurs to me that I could clamp a block to it cut to the same angle to give a larger footing to rest on. And it might be possible to use the extra block clamped to the sliding guide on the table saw. This way I could control the position of the part when cutting the extents of the notches. I think I will explore this option a bit.

Thanks for the input Bob and Rod.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

User avatar
Lowka53
Posts: 1938
Joined: Fri May 14, 2010 11:47 pm
Location: Ogden, Utah-Jubilee build
Contact:

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Lowka53 »

8) glen-l recommends this trailer range Load Capacity - 2900 - 3800 lbs http://www.boatdesigns.com/Trailer-2900 ... fo/12-303/ something of similar size and capacity should work. of course you would have to set the bunks to match the hull :wink:
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
http://www.facebook.com/Home.Made.Boat.Building
Bon Voyage-"Wild Flower" 40' house boat being built
14' Mr John-being built
32' Supper Huck-in design

Rod H

potnol
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:34 pm
Location: Hasselt,Belgium

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by potnol »

I think outboards are a smarter choice because you can just upgrade or change it when you like, but i think that a i/o setup just looks better 8)

Post Reply

Return to “Power Boats”