Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:37 pm

One of the things about the Vera Cruise that I have not been as thrilled about is the cabin height. With a cabin height of 5'4", it's pretty short for me and my 6' body. For quite some time I had pretty much accepted that I would have to live with this. Today, for the heck of it, I played around with the drawing of the boat I have. I wanted to see if I could raise the cabin (not the deck) without making the boat look like a caricature.

I think I might have something that is doable.I thought I would put the before and after drawings up here for opinions and commentary. Remember, the deck is still the same height. The cabin roof was raised approximately 8 inches. The wing to the transom was also raised some to try and blend in with the cabin. This means that the aft cabin will be a bit deeper and the windscreen will also be higher.

So here are the two pictures. I would appreciate any constructive criticism and suggestions, gotchas to watch for, and any other considerations. I would also like to know if it looks okay. Thanks.
CabinNormalHeight-2.jpg
CabinExtendedHeight-2.jpg
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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Lowka53
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Lowka53 » Fri Mar 29, 2013 9:17 pm

8) Looks good to me that is the nice thing about building our own boats we can make the cabins to our liking if we don't go to drastic :wink:
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Bill Edmundson » Sat Mar 30, 2013 6:12 am

I think it looks good and I would do it. You may raising the CG a little. But, it's mostly air. Keep your other weight (tanks, etc.) as low as possible to keep the CG down to compensate.

When these boats were designed I was average height 5'-8". I'm now short. People are just bigger now. I always recommend the 10% stretch for this nery reason. They once said that Vikings were giants. They were 5'-8".

Bill
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:11 pm

Thanks for responding Bill and Rod. I too like the new design. I'm hoping that the additional weight of the mahogany veneers on the hull sides will help to compensate for the higher cabin. Like you said Bill, it's mostly air anyway, but I plan on using tempered glass for the windows so they will be heavier. I still need to do this same re-design on the actual plans to see what I will be gaining, but the exercise with the jpeg drawing was fun and gave me something new to think about.
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sat Apr 06, 2013 11:38 am

Photo Update:

Assembly of frames is proceeding nicely. Had a few cold days where I had to wait but everyday that it's above 50 I am gluing up another part of the frames. So far everything has turned out good after the first screw up. The cinder blocks are an inexpensive way to get weight on the job. I had originally thought of using free weights (but too costly).

I couldn't resist and stood frame 5 vertically to get some idea of the size of the boat. It's was cool looking at it in an attitude other than horizontal. And no, I didn't make boat noises! :)

Frame 4 and 6
20130328_204801.jpg
The gussets on frame 5 before cleaning up the glue.
20130330_162000.jpg
Frame 5 and 6. I've started on the backside of 6 now. One more gusset and then the floor timber.
20130406_121833.jpg
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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Old aussie
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Old aussie » Sat Apr 06, 2013 1:27 pm

Looks good you will be glad that you raised the cabin hight first time you hit rough water, maybe some very thin padding just
in case..

Old Aussie Peter.......

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Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Thu Apr 11, 2013 7:25 pm

We have 3D!!! :D

Couldn't resist doing this. Not actually ready to do this for real yet, but I've been thinking of this since I started and I just had to see it for real.
20130411_203823.jpg
20130411_203845.jpg
20130411_203909.jpg
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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Bill Edmundson » Thu Apr 11, 2013 7:50 pm

:lol: We all do it :!:

Bill
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vettepilot
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by vettepilot » Sat Apr 13, 2013 4:19 am

I like this Boat... the shape reminds me of the older boats around Manly (Australia) many moons ago...Classic lines and very stylish. :D
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sat Apr 13, 2013 5:36 pm

vettepilot wrote:I like this Boat... the shape reminds me of the older boats around Manly (Australia) many moons ago...Classic lines and very stylish. :D
Yeah, I feel the same way. Before I discovered Glen L I was looking into restoring an older boat but the amount of work and expense scared me off :D
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Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun Apr 28, 2013 10:24 am

Update photo: The process is going slowly. I spend time on her everyday but waiting for epoxy to cure slows the process down. So not much to show for the effort. Still, I enjoy getting out in the garage and working on the parts.

Here are the five completed frames so far. I still have glue cleanup to do on several of them.
20130428_091247.jpg
Carl
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obd
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by obd » Wed May 01, 2013 7:58 pm

Nice work! Was there any science to figuring out how much cinder block weight to use without over clamping? Did I understand that you used unthickened epoxy on members and gussets prior to application of thickened epoxy? So if I got this procedure right it should go
1. Secure frame members to layout board
2. align gussets and predrill
3. coat mating surfaces with unthickened epoxy
4. apply layer of thickened epoxy
5. screw/nail gussets
6. flip over frame
7. repeat 2 through 5
8. clamp with mild to moderate weight

Is there any harm in waiting to attach gussets to reverse side until 1st side cured?
Thanks for your help and for the wealth of info in your posts. Bob

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Thu May 02, 2013 5:48 am

obd wrote:Nice work! Was there any science to figuring out how much cinder block weight to use without over clamping? Did I understand that you used unthickened epoxy on members and gussets prior to application of thickened epoxy? So if I got this procedure right it should go
1. Secure frame members to layout board
2. align gussets and predrill
3. coat mating surfaces with unthickened epoxy
4. apply layer of thickened epoxy
5. screw/nail gussets
6. flip over frame
7. repeat 2 through 5
8. clamp with mild to moderate weight

Is there any harm in waiting to attach gussets to reverse side until 1st side cured?
Thanks for your help and for the wealth of info in your posts. Bob
Hi Bob,

I've modified the above process some. I found that precoating with unthickened epoxy and then immediately following up with thickened epoxy was making it difficult to keep the gussets in place so I simply apply thickened epoxy to both parts. I make sure to put enough on to take up any gaps. some of it does end up squeezing out, but I tested this several times and the bonds are very strong.

As for the cinder blocks, no science, just put what I considered adequate weight to hold the parts flat. Most of the pressure has already been applied by the boat nails and or screws by the time I add the cinder blocks.

When adding the gussets, I would apply the glue as mentioned, set the part down and pre drill one hole. I then would put in a boat nail and give it a quick medium hit , just enough to drive it partway into the frame and hold the gusset in place. Of course at this stage you have to be careful that it doesn't slide out of position while drilling and adding the first nail. Then I drill one more hole and repeat with another nail. These two are sufficient to hold it in position while I pre drill the remaining holes and drive in the remaining nails.

So my process is a bit more than what you showed

1.Secure two frame members to board and edge glue them together (use cinder blocks to hold flat).
2. After curing, clean up glue line at the inner edges and then edge glue the filler block that goes between the gussets (if you are adding these). Again add cinder blocks to hold flat and let the epoxy cure.
3. Clean up the glue again and apply the gusset as mentioned previously. Add weight and wait for cure.
4. I had enough room and weights to do two assemblies this way at the same time.
5. If the frame is in two pieces, then repeat the edge glue and filler block and gusset process again for the connection joint.
6. I only flip the frame over after completing all the work on one side.
7. Repeat for the other side.

Whether this approach is the most efficient or not is irrelevant to me. I wanted to insure my parts don't move around while curing and I wanted to insure they remain flat. I'm willing to spend the extra time waiting for each step to cure. This could probably be done more efficiently by adding blocks of wood to hold everything in position and then gluing up several sections at the same time.

One final note, don't forget to put wax paper under and above each gluing or you will find that you've glued the frame to the layout board.

Also, experiment first and get your technique worked out before committing to the actual parts. Good luck.
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

obd
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by obd » Fri May 03, 2013 8:34 pm

Thanks for the info and details! Your experience and this info really helps me plan out the frame construction phase of my build.

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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Mon May 13, 2013 10:29 am

Well, not a lot of visible progress since last posting. I have been at work but most of it is in items that look the same before and after. Still have some finish work to do on the frames as well as encapsulating them. Hoping to start on the building form within the month. I will also be assembling the stem, cleaning that up and encapsulating it as well.

I'm using the frames as a trial run for coating with epoxy. I figure that I can get my coating technique down (i.e. absence of bubbles in the finish) while I get these coated. This way when it comes time to finish the exterior I can avoid a lot of heartache on the finish (one can only practice and hope for the best)
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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