Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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alycat
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by alycat » Sun Apr 20, 2014 7:16 am

Man o man, lookin good!!! Love the technique for steaming! I have to tuck that one away if I have the need to steam bending something again! Your workmanship is somethin else!!
Will Manwaring
Shreveport, LA

Barrelback 19' stretched to 20'

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obd
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by obd » Sun Apr 20, 2014 4:00 pm

Looking good Carl! I have been reading through several different builds. Some builders have suggested laminating the chines. I noticed yours are full thickness. Do you feel that using full thickness chines has been a big deal, particularly with the creative steam bending technique you have employed?

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun Apr 20, 2014 4:34 pm

neel thompson wrote:It is all coming together nicely Carl. She is looking good...
alycat wrote:Man o man, lookin good!!! Love the technique for steaming! I have to tuck that one away if I have the need to steam bending something again! Your workmanship is somethin else!!
obd wrote:Looking good Carl! I have been reading through several different builds. Some builders have suggested laminating the chines. I noticed yours are full thickness. Do you feel that using full thickness chines has been a big deal, particularly with the creative steam bending technique you have employed?
sscobra wrote:Nice work Carl. I keep forgetting to get in touch with you and setting up a time for me to come over and admire your work in person. Skip
Thanks Neel, I'm trying to keep up the quality that I've seen exhibited here. Not sure I'm there yet, but I'm trying.

Will, Thanks for the compliment. I can't take credit for the steaming technique, I found out about it here in the forum. But it does work well.

Obd (sorry I can't remember your name), Thanks. The full thickness chine is what is called out in the plans. I suppose I could have laminated it. The full thickness has been a real challenge with bending even with the steam. Lamination would have been easier I am sure. My only concern with laminating is getting the cut angles correct at the stem.

Skip, Thanks. Feel free to PM me whenever you want to come by. I appreciate the desire to admire my work, but from looking over your pictures, I think you are the better craftsman. :)


Quick update,

I got the first sheer pre-bent. I have to pre-bend all of them because I cannot put the far side ones in place due to lack of space on that side of the boat. So the plan is to pre-bend, then do the scarf joint and finally do the install.

The chines are still in work as well, but having trouble getting them to conform. I think this latest round f steam "persuasion" will do the trick. We'll see.

Here is the sheer. I still have to tweak the notches up front.
IMG_20140420_105758.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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kens
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by kens » Sun Apr 20, 2014 5:46 pm

I wish I had known about that steam kit when I was building, I would gladly given the 65 bucks, well worth it.
Kool beans.
Oak is over rated, everything about it takes extra time; then it warps, splits or checks !!! :roll:

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:23 pm

Yes I got lucky and found out about this steamer from the forum. As long as you keep an eye on the water levels and refill with boiling water (if necessary) it works great. Steaming time is easily over an hour. You could probably go nearly 90 minutes before the water level gets too low. What I did when I needed to steam longer was to start boiling refill water about ten minutes before I needed it, then temporarily shut it off and refill.

Steam generation after the refill usually occurs within a minute. The parts in the plastic wrap hardly even cool down during that time.

The first chine angle at the stem has been cut and the piece re-bent. However, the angle is a bit off and I need to adjust it. also the amount of pressure needed to keep the chine in place (even after steaming) is considerable. I think I can alleviate that somewhat by deepening the forward notch edge on frame 6 (steepen the angle) which should mean that the chine has to bend a bit less.

Started getting sick yesterday and after working this all week on the chines, it's getting a bit tedious, so I've decided to give it a rest for a few days. When I get back to it, I'll adjust that chine angle and try and get the first chine glued into position.

Here's a picture showing the current state of the chine angle. You can see where I need to adjust the cut on the angle. It's also quite difficult to clamp this area.
IMG_20140421_193500.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Roberta
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Roberta » Tue Apr 22, 2014 5:10 am

Looking good, Carl!! Try using ratchet straps to pull the chines in. You can hook them to the first frame behind aft of the breasthook and slowly crank the chines into the stem. I get them close to determine the angle needed, cut, add glue, crank it in, and secure with a couple of screws.

Roberta :D
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Tue Apr 22, 2014 5:49 am

Roberta wrote:Looking good, Carl!! Try using ratchet straps to pull the chines in. You can hook them to the first frame behind aft of the breasthook and slowly crank the chines into the stem. I get them close to determine the angle needed, cut, add glue, crank it in, and secure with a couple of screws.

Roberta :D
Thanks Roberta,

I did use a ratchet strap initially wrapping it around the stem and the chine and that pulled it well enough. The problem with that particular approach was that the amount of strap left over after cinching up made it very difficult to tighten the ratchet and later to release it. I'm very leery about ratcheting the chine from the frame aft of it, fearing that something will either break or be pulled out of position. I've been trying to isolate the pulling either to the building form or in this case the stem.

I had another idea for ratcheting to the stem that I will try. Basically I will still wrap the strap around the stem and the chine, but I am going to place a large piece of wood on the backside of the stem so that I have more strap available to cinch up. I believe that will do the trick. As mentioned, I am somewhat sick at the moment (stupid yearly cold!!!) so it will be a few days before I feel like doing this.

Also, Roberta, just wanted to say that I am in total awe of your ability to get the Torpedo done so quickly. I realize you have more time available than I do, but it takes energy as well and I am sure you get very tired doing this. I know I do and I am in pretty good health. Your work is an inspiration to all of us here on the forum. (I am going t post this to your build thread as well because I feel it needs to be said.)

Cheers
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Roberta
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Roberta » Tue Apr 22, 2014 6:26 am

Thanks, Carl!!

I forgot that your frames are not totally anchored yet. I had the advantage of anchoring my front frames to the harpin, making them less susceptible to twisting. You could maybe try to do both chines and pull them in together by tying the two with one strap.

Roberta :D
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

John56
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by John56 » Tue Apr 22, 2014 4:53 pm

mrintense wrote:Yes I got lucky and found out about this steamer from the forum. As long as you keep an eye on the water levels and refill with boiling water (if necessary) it works great. Steaming time is easily over an hour. You could probably go nearly 90 minutes before the water level gets too low. What I did when I needed to steam longer was to start boiling refill water about ten minutes before I needed it, then temporarily shut it off and refill.

Steam generation after the refill usually occurs within a minute. The parts in the plastic wrap hardly even cool down during that time.

The first chine angle at the stem has been cut and the piece re-bent. However, the angle is a bit off and I need to adjust it. also the amount of pressure needed to keep the chine in place (even after steaming) is considerable. I think I can alleviate that somewhat by deepening the forward notch edge on frame 6 (steepen the angle) which should mean that the chine has to bend a bit less.

Started getting sick yesterday and after working this all week on the chines, it's getting a bit tedious, so I've decided to give it a rest for a few days. When I get back to it, I'll adjust that chine angle and try and get the first chine glued into position.

Here's a picture showing the current state of the chine angle. You can see where I need to adjust the cut on the angle. It's also quite difficult to clamp this area.
IMG_20140421_193500.jpg

Looking great. Though my build is a barrelback, I started with chine install at stem, then worked aft. Went pretty well.
Just a small palm plane and that joint should snug up nicely.

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BarnacleMike
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by BarnacleMike » Wed Apr 23, 2014 10:21 am

It's looking great, Carl! I know that's got to be a lot of work, working with such thick chine material.
-Michael

Built Utility "Perseverance" — completed Aug 2016
Currently building a Zip
My Boatbuilding Blog: http://barnaclemikeboats.blogspot.com/
My Website of Boat Photos: https://michaelsmaddox.wordpress.com

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Gayle Brantuk
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Gayle Brantuk » Wed Apr 23, 2014 10:22 am

Well done tutorial about the steaming, Carl--thank you for posting that. I really like the paint scheme you have on your blog for the Vera Cruise.

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Wed Apr 23, 2014 11:24 am

John56 wrote: Looking great. Though my build is a barrelback, I started with chine install at stem, then worked aft. Went pretty well.
Just a small palm plane and that joint should snug up nicely.
BarnacleMike wrote:It's looking great, Carl! I know that's got to be a lot of work, working with such thick chine material.
Gayle Brantuk wrote:Well done tutorial about the steaming, Carl--thank you for posting that. I really like the paint scheme you have on your blog for the Vera Cruise.
John, thanks. I wanted to start at the stem and work backwards. That's the recommended way, but lack of space in my garage dictated the opposite approach. I need to get me a plane. I've never used one before. How do they work across the end of a piece of lumber? I've been using a combination of a Japanese razor saw, a file, and a wood rasp. Works okay but trying to keep the saw at the correct angle can sometimes be a challenge.

Mike, thanks. Yeah, the thick chine is taking longer than I expected. I had originally hoped to have both installed by last weekend. Still need to finish the first one. As soon as I feel well enough (another day or two) I am going to get back into it.

Gayle, Thanks for the compliments on the paint scheme. I'm hoping it will be a nice compromise between bright finish and easier to maintain paint finish. The drawing doesn't show it, but the transom will be bright finish as well. As for the steaming tutorial, it's my pleasure to return to the forum. I found out about the method here on the forum and felt that it was perfect for my needs. So far it has worked quite well.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Bill Edmundson » Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:57 pm

Carl

That is what this forum is all about. Returning what you have learned. The reward is seeing the boats get better.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Wed Apr 23, 2014 3:00 pm

Bill Edmundson wrote:Carl

That is what this forum is all about. Returning what you have learned. The reward is seeing the boats get better.

Bill
I quite agree Bill. And I think from what I've seen so far that this may be a rewarding year as more boats get ready for launch! :)

Wish mine was going to be one of them. :(
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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sscobra
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sscobra » Wed Apr 23, 2014 10:32 pm

Carl, not having been to you garage, I can't be certain that my technique will work for you, but it might. My space is also very limited, about 1.5 feet between the widest part of the boat and the wall of my shop. I attached my chines from the stem back towards the transom. I used a roller stand, although anything tall enough would work, back near the transom end of the chine piece, up against the wall. I rested the chine on it and then placed the chine in the slot of the frame nearest the stem, bowing the chine against the wall of my shop. Since the chine is not in the other slots it is much easier to bend it toward the stem. You can loosely clamp the chine in that first slot to help hold it. I then held a piece of wood against the opposite side of the stem and the first frame back from the stem, roughly parallel to the chine. I then used an Irwin type quick clamp (squeeze grip) to clamp between the chine and this piece of wood. This freed up my hands to get a c-clamp ready. This way you can clamp between two roughly parallel pieces of wood instead of the angle of the stem with respect to the chine. You can really pull the chine in tight to the stem. It might take several iterations to get the chine in just the right position. When you have it there, mark where the chine leaves the slot in the frame nearest the stem, so when you get ready to glue it in place, you have a reference mark to line things up. You can also drill the holes in the chine for screwing it to the stem. Then just work back towards the transom. If your chine is not cut at just the right angle to mate up to the stem, place a piece of wood on top of the chine, against the stem, making sure that this piece of wood is thick enough to cover any gap between the chine and the stem. Use your saw (a Japanese pull saw in my case) and use this piece of wood as a guide to cut the chine. This piece of wood insures that you are cutting perfectly parallel to the stem. Skip
Built the Glen-L Monaco, 2016.

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