Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Fri Aug 17, 2018 6:58 pm

Everyday, a little more work gets done. Sometimes not so much that it can be photographed. Then finally something worth shooting a picture of. The side cabinets have been veneered now. Next up will be adding a Cherry hardwood edge on the curve , blending it into the fiddle. Then I am going to start working on the front cover pates and top shelf (which will also be veneered).
IMG_20180817_201922.jpg

I've been thinking over what I will be doing next. So many choices, but I think I will begin fairing the remainder of the top structure in preparation for the top planking. There's still plenty of work on the interior I want and need to get done before putting on the planking, but I am looking for a change of pace. So I will finish up some of the cabinet, getting it to a point where I can stain it, then set it aside for a week before encapsulation. Then onto fairing.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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hoodman
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by hoodman » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:17 pm

Carl, I think I get it now. The cabinet is going to be really cool.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun Aug 19, 2018 9:13 am

Continuing work on the cabinet. The front of the cabinet will be getting decorative cover boards which I need to make a jig to do. The lower part of the cabinet will have a floor hinged door (simulated in the picture with a piece of plywood). This will give me good access to the water tanks and pump.

The plan for the upper part is a drawer on the left (approximately 4" deep and about 14 " wide). A small cabinet door will be below that. On the right will be a taller cabinet door giving access to the plumbing of the sink (also on the right) and access to the bilge hose and anything else running behind the cabinet.
IMG_20180819_102836.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Mon Aug 20, 2018 6:38 am

I spent several hours yesterday trying to make some custom trim molding for my cabinet, all with no luck. Oh there were some successes. I was able to make a usable jig to cut straight grooves with my router and I was able t figure out a way to have several of those grooves be parallel to each other.

But I could not cut the grooves using my router without creating nasty burn marks in the Cherry. Come to find out after looking up various solutions that Cherry is particularly susceptible to burning when routering. Believe me, I tried everything I could thing of, shallow cuts, sharpened bits, slow speeds on the router. Some stretches looked okay, but if I even stopped moving for a fraction of a second, it would burn the wood.

Well, after looking at Steve's trawler thread yesterday, specifically the interior shots, it hit me that perhaps I am trying to hard to reinvent the wheel. I realized that there are any number of places that make trim molding in all manner of shapes and styles. I started looking into and found I can get what I need in Cherry wood and the price is no more than I was planning on spending on new router bits.

So I will be looking at these trim options and as soon as I find the one I want, I will be ordering this (instead of the router bits). Thanks Steve, for reminding me that sometimes, it's better to go with the flow!!

As soon as I have some pictures, I'll post them.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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steveh41
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by steveh41 » Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:34 am

Glad that worked out Carl...

Regards,

Steve
Last edited by steveh41 on Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Tue Aug 21, 2018 7:19 pm

I am going to post this drawing in hopes that someone here can suggest a solution to the trim piece problems I am having. The pieces in question are the two side cover boards and top horizontal cover board (all shown in the drawing). These are 3/4" thick Cherry approximately 2 inches wide and 27 to 34 inches in length. So far ever effort I have made to cut the flutes has resulted in unsandable burn marks in the flutes. I've tried locating trim molding that approximates this look, but so far have not found anything.

Hopefully someone can suggest a solution that I haven't thought of. For reference, I've been trying to cut the flutes with a router using a 1/4" Cove bit (rounded cutting end) set to approximately 1/8" depth cut into the wood and tapered to nothing at the ends. I made a jig to make the lines straight and taper the ends of the cuts.
Boat Cabinet Front  View Design.png
IMG_20180819_102836.jpg
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Milhouse
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Milhouse » Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:59 pm

Carl - Are you using a router table or running the router on the top? Do you have a pic of your setup?

I would cut them in two passes and GO FASTER. The speed is why its burning; your moving the router or wood too slow and/or its a dull bit.

I would probably use a router table with stops setup on each end (or maybe you have a ramp? to get that fade) and drop the pieces on top of the bit while moving it of and NEVER let it sit still for any fraction of a second, that will burn cherry for sure.

I use a lot of cherry for my fine furniture work and you have to go reasonably fast especially when changing directions around corners etc. when you feel like you should slow down; resist the urge.

Article on feeds and speeds

Oh, you could also do it by hand with a hand molding plane :)
Last edited by Milhouse on Tue Aug 21, 2018 9:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Jimbob
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Jimbob » Tue Aug 21, 2018 9:08 pm

As Jim said, make the cut in two passes. The final pass should be just a trim cut. Keep the router moving, if you stop chances are it will burn. Probably the most important thing to do is slow down the speed on your router. I usually set my router to half speed when cutting hard wood.
Jim
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:31 am

Thanks Jim and Jim for the responses. I did try all of these already. The router is spinning as slow as it can. I actually made the cuts in three passes. Thanks for the link.

The approach is using a handheld router as I do not have a router table.

To answer your question Jim (Milhouse),The jig I made is a piece of plywood with a fence to guide the router. At the ends are 10 degree ramps to accomplish the fade out of the cut. It works reasonably well for cutting except for the burning. I think I would probably try to improve on the fence as it's difficult to keep the router held against it and keep it moving at the same time.

I also believe the router bit could be better and I am considering ordering a new one.

However before doing any of that, I am going to try a different technique that I found out about last night. I'd heard of this before but usually in the context of making custom cove molding for homes. The techniques involves running the cover boards through the table saw at a slight angle (approximately 3 degrees) using two parallel fences and the board in between them. The saw blade is raised slightly with each pass until the desired depth is reached.

The only thing about this technique is that I have not quite figured out how to accomplish the fade out yet. Perhaps this can be done by hand using a dremel tool and a grinder bit. Most of what I have worked out in my mind has been how to accomplish the parallel grooves. All of this came at the expense of my sleeping last night, so I am pretty foggy this morning.

Anyway, I will be experimenting with this hopefully this afternoon after work. I still have the option of getting a new router bit and improving my routing jig, but the table saw method has the benefit of not costing any money, so I will try it first.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

neel thompson
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by neel thompson » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:45 am

Carl... Wouldn't the saw blade, being round, make the fade naturally at the end of each cut? Maybe it would be too steep for your liking.

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:49 am

neel thompson wrote:Carl... Wouldn't the saw blade, being round, make the fade naturally at the end of each cut? Maybe it would be too steep for your liking.

Good point Neel,

I'll see what what looks like. Possibly using a larger blade might help with that, but then I would have to buy one. Any, still pretty tired this morning so can't think straight.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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hoodman
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by hoodman » Wed Aug 22, 2018 4:12 am

I hate routers. I almost never seem to get the result I want. Plus it's the loudest most obnoxious tool in my arsenal. Except my little 100 year old hand router. That thing is a joy. Maybe there is a way to cut a cove by hand. But would probably require a specialized plane like a Stanley 55.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by TomB » Wed Aug 22, 2018 5:50 am

Carl,

The moldings are available in cherry, except for the start/stop. In most residential moldings, there is a rose or block at the corners. Would some sort of carved detail at the corners be acceptable?

As an alternative, there are still used molding cutters for table saws out there. They are scary to use.

Check with your local architectural millwork firms, the guy who supply millwork for commercial jobs. They can make almost anything you can dream up. Hold onto something if you talk to them, prices can make you weak.

Tom

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by TomB » Wed Aug 22, 2018 6:36 am

Something like this for your table saw https://www.ebay.com/itm/Craftsman-Benc ... 2843376652 with something like this https://www.ebay.com/itm/Craftsman-Benc ... 2843376652 would probably work. It may still burn, that's cherry. Tom

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Jimbob » Wed Aug 22, 2018 7:29 am

Hi Carl,
With everything you have tried, I'll bet it's the router bit. I have had great success with whiteside carbide bits. HFT bits are ok too.
Jim
Jim Neeley
Building a Barrelback in Sacramento, CA
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