Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:22 am

Question about limbers on the keel.

I'm looking these over now and wondering if the limber needs to be the full depth of the notch or just the depth of the second keel. Just as a point of reference, my keel is two pieces of 3/4" laminated together.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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rbrandenstein
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by rbrandenstein » Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:28 am

Deep enough for water to flow through. :wink:
I made mine the batten depth, which was about 3/4"
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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Bill Edmundson » Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:50 am

Carl

Make them full depth. By the time you finish fairing, sealing, painting... It will take very little trash to stop them up.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
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sscobra
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sscobra » Wed Feb 19, 2014 4:35 pm

mrintense wrote:
sscobra wrote:Looking great Carl! I need to come over sometime to check out your build. I am in the process of installing my chines now. I have been steam bending them, but not really sure it helped that much. My chines are two layers of 3/4" thick material. I am using African Mahogany and it seems to bend fairly well, even without steam. Are your chines single pieces of thicker wood? If so, maybe you could laminate them with thinner, easier to bend pieces, to add up to the total needed thickness. Skip
Thanks Skip,

Feel free to PM whenever you want to get together. I'd like to see your boat as well at some point.

As for the chines, on mine, they are full thickness (one piece). I can't recall at the moment what that is but it is over an inch. I'll most likely steam them. Biggest problem for me is the boat is parked bow in and I have no room to slide a steaming tube over the chine from the front. I still need to evaluate what I am going to do so at this point I cannot say for sure what the final approach will be.
alycat wrote:Looking good. I used a fabric steamer to steam bend the chine and sheer into place. It worked really good, with no issues, except for a few hot pieces of wood, use gloves!! I used a 2 inch piece of PVC and stuffed the ends with some rags. Also researched on the internet to steam mahogany for 1 hour for every inch of thickness. I steamed mine for about 45 min, comes out like spaghetti but quickly cools, so you have to work fast and clamp it in quick. I didn't have a helper but could have used a pair of extra hands.
Thanks Will. I am probably going to use this method as well but as I just mentioned above, space is a problem that I need to figure out a solution for.
Carl, when I steam bent my chines, I did it outside, off the boat. Then I just carried them into my shop and clamped them in position in the chine slots and let them cool and dry overnight. The next day I removed them, then epoxied them from the stem back toward the transom. On my Monaco there is a severe twist in the chines between frames 7 and 8 (the last two) and I found it a lot easier to install the chine in those slots first with it positioned up against the stem where it needed to be, clamped it there, then lift the chine into the slots in frame 6 and proceed toward the transom, bending it as I went. I loosely clamped it near the transom or frame 1. I then added clamps from the stem back toward the transom so the chine was fully in position in all the slots. If I installed it from the transom forward, then I would have needed to bend a short length of the chine to twist it into the slots in frame 7 and 8 and that takes a lot more force (Ozzieboat used a 4' long pipe clamp) to do this and I couldn't see doing that, holding it place, and trying to clamp it there by myself. It was so much easier bending the chine by holding it near the transom end because you have a much longer moment arm (if you are familiar with those engineering terms) then if you tried to bend the last three feet of it. I had previously clamped the chines in position in frames 7 and 8 so I could cut the end of the chine to fit properly up against the stem. I left the chines long so I could make another cut on the stem end if it didn't fit right. I then cut the chines at the transom end after I epoxied them in place. However, on my transom, I haven't sheeted it in plywood, so the chines could run long. On yours, you would have to cut the chine to fit into the slot. It is much easier to make a straight cut there then the multiple angle one at the stem. After saying all this, I must admit that I am not familiar with the Vera Cruise, so I don't know that it would work the same way for you. Skip
Built the Glen-L Monaco, 2016.

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:12 pm

Thanks for responding Bob and Bill. Deeper it will be.

I may have to steam my chines outside the garage Skip. Not sure yet. Unfortunately, bending from the transom end will be a difficult proposition because of the lack of side space I have. One idea I am considering is to pre-bend both pieces on the same side (the side nearest the work bench where I have more side space. Then do the final fitting as needed. Since I still have to get the keel installed, I am temporarily putting the chines out of my mind.

As for the keel, first I needed to get the transom located back into it's final position and make sure everything lines up. I got it clamped into position the evening and checked the keel against it. Good to go there. I made sure that the transom angle is correct and installed positive locators to insure everything stays put.

Next I will be cutting the limbers on the sides of the keel notches. Too late tonight to make any noise so I will start on that tomorrow.

Here's the transom in final position.
IMG_20140219_193504.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

Joris
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Joris » Thu Feb 20, 2014 4:25 am

Carl,
Just wondering, why not laminate the chines? For chines and sheers in 3 layers i think it took me about 3 evenings. A lot less tension and maybe even an improvement in strength...

Joris

neel thompson
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by neel thompson » Thu Feb 20, 2014 6:13 am

Make it easy on yourself Carl and simply laminate them....Your frames and transom look great and you can just about see a boat in there somewhere... Nice work....Neel

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sat Feb 22, 2014 4:53 pm

Thanks for input guys. I am considering laminating the chine. Currently the wood is already milled to full thickness so I would have to cut it in half to do that. My table saw skills are not the greatest and I am leery of attempting to do so. So I will do some more considering. I still have a bit of work on the keel to accomplish. I also have to buy a bunch more clamps!

Yesterday and today I managed to get some work done in preparation for installing the keel. The limbers have been cut and I started encapsulating the inner surface of the first keel member. I don't want to have to do this later when the hull is flipped so I can get some of this out of the way now.

Here is the latest photo. Still need to apply a couple more coats of epoxy. This is the inner surface and the keel will be flipped over when installed. The second lamination will be added in a few days after I have more clamps.
IMG_20140222_154324.jpg
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sat Mar 01, 2014 3:10 pm

Well, after my last post I ran into a few days of cold weather and then just as it started to get warm again, I ran into the flu. My second case this year. I usually never get sick and I even had a flu shot, but this winter has been strange in many ways. Colder than usual and perhaps the polar vortex is swirling the flu virus around a bit more than normal.

Anyway, today I felt well enough to start fitting the keel to the transom and stem. I had started this last week and had encapsulated portions of the keel that were expose don the inside of the boat. as I mentioned in Bill's Bartender 24 build thread, I am finding that the fitting I did previously in these areas is not matching up as nice as it had before. Most likely the transom removal and assembly and subsequent re-installation on the building form didn't quite get it to the original position.

I have to laminate a small shim on one frame member in the keel notch in order to get the keel to be flat across the back of the boat. I'll be doing that tomorrow.

We're expecting some more cold weather on Monday, so it may be a few more days before I can actually install the keel.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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sscobra
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sscobra » Sat Mar 01, 2014 10:38 pm

Sorry to hear about your flu. That's terrible to get it twice in one year. The weather here has been very strange this year, hasn't it? Maybe it won't get too cold for you to do some work. Skip
Built the Glen-L Monaco, 2016.

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:50 pm

Sorry that I've been away from the board for a bit. Very busy these days with work and home issues. But I did get the keel glued up finally. The boat is no longer a collection of parts. It's now one part!
IMG_20140311_185722.jpg
IMG_20140311_185817.jpg
Carl
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Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Bill Edmundson » Tue Mar 11, 2014 6:53 pm

Carl

Good going. From now on it will get stronger with each piece.

Bill
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Roberta
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Roberta » Wed Mar 12, 2014 4:50 am

Nice!! I wish I was that neat!!!!

Roberta :D :D :D :D
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steveh41
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by steveh41 » Wed Mar 12, 2014 12:35 pm

Congrats on the keel installation Carl... a big step forward! :D

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by neel thompson » Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:22 pm

Very nice Carl.. What did you do, rob the clamp store?? There must be some wood somewhere under those metal things!!

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