Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Fri Apr 25, 2014 7:24 am

sscobra wrote:Carl, not having been to you garage, I can't be certain that my technique will work for you, but it might. My space is also very limited, about 1.5 feet between the widest part of the boat and the wall of my shop. I attached my chines from the stem back towards the transom. I used a roller stand, although anything tall enough would work, back near the transom end of the chine piece, up against the wall. I rested the chine on it and then placed the chine in the slot of the frame nearest the stem, bowing the chine against the wall of my shop. Since the chine is not in the other slots it is much easier to bend it toward the stem. You can loosely clamp the chine in that first slot to help hold it. I then held a piece of wood against the opposite side of the stem and the first frame back from the stem, roughly parallel to the chine. I then used an Irwin type quick clamp (squeeze grip) to clamp between the chine and this piece of wood. This freed up my hands to get a c-clamp ready. This way you can clamp between two roughly parallel pieces of wood instead of the angle of the stem with respect to the chine. You can really pull the chine in tight to the stem. It might take several iterations to get the chine in just the right position. When you have it there, mark where the chine leaves the slot in the frame nearest the stem, so when you get ready to glue it in place, you have a reference mark to line things up. You can also drill the holes in the chine for screwing it to the stem. Then just work back towards the transom. If your chine is not cut at just the right angle to mate up to the stem, place a piece of wood on top of the chine, against the stem, making sure that this piece of wood is thick enough to cover any gap between the chine and the stem. Use your saw (a Japanese pull saw in my case) and use this piece of wood as a guide to cut the chine. This piece of wood insures that you are cutting perfectly parallel to the stem. Skip

Thanks for the idea Skip. I read this yesterday but was too busy too respond. Part of it didn't make sense to me at the time because I hadn't read it closely. The part about having a board between the stem and the next frame back that was parallel to the chine.

It hit me this morning on the way to work. I understand now what you meant and it looks like that will be the ticket for getting some clamping on the area. I also like the idea of using a block of wood slightly larger than the gap at the stem / chine angle to use as a guide for the saw.

As for installing from front to back, I think I can use that as well although slightly modified. The amount of bend at the front would make this difficult to start without some preliminary bending. Also I don't have the notch in frame 6 (closest to the stem) on the second chine established yet. So I think I will do the preliminary bend at frame 5 to get me in the ball park, then try the approach of finishing the fitting and installation going from front to back.

I admit to not having been out in the garage since Monday(had to get over a cold sufficiently) so I will need to look everything over before trying this approach. But the longer leverage available doing this way would be great to have.
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun Apr 27, 2014 6:46 am

Well Skip's ideas for clamping and sawing the chine angle both worked great. Thanks Skip (sscobra). I now have one of the chines fully installed.
IMG_20140427_055453.jpg
IMG_20140427_055504.jpg
IMG_20140427_055528.jpg
Now I can finish the second chine and get back to the sheers.

Feels good to have this first chine in place. Hopefully the second one will go in easier.
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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Roberta
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Roberta » Sun Apr 27, 2014 8:31 am

Look's Great, Carl!!

Roberta :D :D :D :D
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sscobra
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sscobra » Sun Apr 27, 2014 10:22 pm

Looking great Carl! I have gotten a lot of help in my build, so I am glad I was able to pass on a little help. Skip
Built the Glen-L Monaco, 2016.

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:43 am

Thanks Roberta and Skip.

Last night, got the second chine bent down to the stem. Tonight, I am going to make the angle cut and then trim the chine to length. If I have time, I may glue it in to position. If not tonight, soon.
Carl
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Fri May 02, 2014 8:18 pm

Well, it's in. The second chine is now installed. What a bear to get into position! I am really glad to be done with that. Really can't say I had much fun with that process.

The front is a little bit low (about a 8th of an inch) and I will have to laminate a thin piece on the outside to bring it up to the correct height. Not sure how that happened because it was fitting correctly throughout the fitting process. No real harm except to my pride. Having a beer now to calm down and going to give it a rest for a day before starting back up.
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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sscobra
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sscobra » Sat May 03, 2014 9:44 pm

Good job Carl! I know what a relief it must have been to get the chines installed. Soon you get to fair them! I found the sheers easier to install. Maybe yours will be also. Skip
Built the Glen-L Monaco, 2016.

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Lowka53
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Lowka53 » Sun May 04, 2014 9:42 am

8) you have came a long way Carl from the first worries about almost everything on a boat and you see now people are using your build to get information on there own builds that's the way we do it here giving forward. All I can say friend is keep at it your work is great :wink: I hope to get working on my build again but the power that be are at it again throwing road blocks against me I will over come them once again I am sure. 8)
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun May 04, 2014 4:05 pm

sscobra wrote:Good job Carl! I know what a relief it must have been to get the chines installed. Soon you get to fair them! I found the sheers easier to install. Maybe yours will be also. Skip
Lowka53 wrote:8) you have came a long way Carl from the first worries about almost everything on a boat and you see now people are using your build to get information on there own builds that's the way we do it here giving forward. All I can say friend is keep at it your work is great :wink: I hope to get working on my build again but the power that be are at it again throwing road blocks against me I will over come them once again I am sure. 8)
Thanks Skip, yes it is a relief to be done with those parts. Working with wood is quite different than working with metal (what I used to do as an aircraft mechanic before changing careers) however one thing that is the same is that parts rarely fit quite right and need some "persuasion' to get them into the correct position. :)

Thanks Rod. I went back and looked over my early postings and saw what you meant. :)

I'm glad that people can find my site and postings useful. Rod, it sounds like you need a good luck charm. I'm reminded of the story about Abraham Lincoln where he was thrown one obstacle after another including if I recall correctly, the death of his wife (or maybe she got very sick). But in spite of all the obstacles, he kept falling forward and eventually became president. Who knows Rod, maybe..........

Today, I've been cutting notches for the second sheer. This is on the side of the boat that has limited room to work. The lack of space combined with the need to make cuts low to the ground has made for slow going. I'm about 2/3rds the way through them. Taking a break to make dinner and then I will go back to work on them for a few more hours. Test fitting the pre-bent sheer from the first side on the second side has convinced me that my plan to pre-bend all the sheers on the first side will work out okay.

Once I've got the notches finished I have three more pieces to pre-bend and then I have to scarf join all four sheers for added length. Then installation.

Not too much longer and I will beginning the fairing (woo hoo!) :lol:
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun May 11, 2014 1:02 pm

Well, I've been fighting the sheers this last week. I finally got a preliminary glue up of the first port side sheer. Because of some fit problems and the difficulty in handling the long sheer, (longer after I extended it with a scarf join), I elected to glue the part to the breasthook only initially and let that cure before gluing the remaining notches.

I went out and bought another 18 clamps so I think I have enough now for the second sheer lamination. Thank God for Harbor Freight and their decent and inexpensive sliding clamps.

Here's a few pictures of the boat as of today.
IMG_20140508_194149.jpg
Making the part longer with a scarf join.
IMG_20140508_194216.jpg
I pre-bent the sheer before scarfing it so that I could make the bend inside the garage and not have to deal with the extra length.
IMG_20140511_133821.jpg
The clamping jig I am using. At this point only the breasthook is glued to the sheer.
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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gdcarpenter
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by gdcarpenter » Sun May 11, 2014 1:16 pm

That is one tight squeeze!

From the last close up photo the sheer that's now in place looks like it's set back appropriately from the stem's forward/leading edge to allow the stem's front edge to be 'faired' later - if you will be adding a second lamination this will not be the case.

Amazing how creative one gets with jigs and clamps!
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun May 11, 2014 1:55 pm

gdcarpenter wrote:From the last close up photo the sheer that's now in place looks like it's set back appropriately from the stem's forward/leading edge to allow the stem's front edge to be 'faired' later - if you will be adding a second lamination this will not be the case.
Damn! You're correct. I completely missed that! There is a second lamination! :(

Not sure how I am going to correct that.
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by gdcarpenter » Sun May 11, 2014 2:32 pm

Don't shoot the messenger! Better to have caught it now rather than later.

Plan A: use multi tool and cut back breast hook edge that's glued to the sheer and reset sheer further back.

Plan B: add to/build up forward edge of stem, preferably with solid wood, you will be fairing away most all of what you add anyway.

Sometimes a second set of eyes can help, we all tend to get "tunnel vision" from time to time, except at my age I just pass them off as 'senior moments'. :)
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense » Sun May 11, 2014 2:48 pm

gdcarpenter wrote:Don't shoot the messenger! Better to have caught it now rather than later.

Plan A: use multi tool and cut back breast hook edge that's glued to the sheer and reset sheer further back.

Plan B: add to/build up forward edge of stem, preferably with solid wood, you will be fairing away most all of what you add anyway.

Sometimes a second set of eyes can help, we all tend to get "tunnel vision" from time to time, except at my age I just pass them off as 'senior moments'. :)
Sorry, I wasn't meaning to sound like I was shooting the messenger. I am glad you noticed it now as well.

I agree that one of those two options is the way to fix this.

Plan A (Cutback breasthook): Biggest drawback I see to this is a reduction in the breasthook size. This is a bit more risky of a repair but given my space constraints at the front of the boat when I get to fairing, perhaps the better choice. One thing I need to determine is how much I would need to cut back. More that 5/8" (the thickness of one lamination) and it might be excessive.

Plan B (Extend stem): I agree that it would have to be solid wood. It could be blended into the stem and wouldn't change the curve of the bow too much. I like this idea mainly because it doesn't require me cutting up any existing parts. I am a bit concerned about being able to get the fairing done at the very end where it's closest to the wall. Also wondering if there will be any structural problems using this approach?
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by gdcarpenter » Sun May 11, 2014 3:12 pm

I know you were not shooting the messenger. :)

I don't think either 'Plan' would cause any structural weakening whatsoever. There's essentially a 3 sided pyramid shape where stem meets deck, all united and reinforced significantly when the side and deck ply is installed. Adding a layer to the stem front edge looks tricky, and, like you said, would make fairing a royal PITA!

You have the correct setback now by the looks of things, and you could always bevel a small section of the stem to verify your current set back. A multitool then makes the 'cut back' relatively easy, it's a tool that well worth having if you don't have one, and even a light duty 'Dremel'' unit would do fine. Might need to do 2 cuts, 1 to 'free' chine and 1 to cut back breast hook.

We've all been there and done that at some point or another!
This is my first, last and only boat build.

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