Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Wed Aug 29, 2012 3:25 am

belphil wrote:What tools are you using for the project?


Hi JB,

Thanks for the encouragement. I'm fairly happy with the results so far (although I wish I hadn't wasted that one part).

As for tools, I bought a Bosch Jig Saw and a Rigid Sanding station. The jig saw has worked very well and I believe it will fulfill most if not all of my needs for this project as far as cutting goes.

The sanding station also worked fairly well. I need to get some better unidirectional sanding belts for it because the one belt that came with it is one direction only so I can only use half of it (assuming I want to rest the part on the table). It doesn't move real fast , but fast enough. At some point I am sure I will have to buy a regular hand held belt sander, but I'm playing this by ear.

Other than that the only other tools have been a combination square, a yard stick, an X-Acto knife, a measuring tape, masking tape, and a pencil (oh, and carbon paper).

I have a table saw when I get ready to start ripping battens and the keel but I don't have the lumber for that yet. This is definitely a shoestring budget. :wink:

How is your project coming along.. BTW I forgot to mention I found a Ford 4 cylinder engine (PUMA) that appears to weigh in under the 700 lb limit. The engine is a Ford Puma diesel and the outfit is in England (Lancing marine). Not sure about pricing (probably astronomical). I still haven't decided which way to go yet.

Take care

here is the link

http://www.lancingmarine.com/databook/databook.html
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

Gentleman Jeff
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby Gentleman Jeff » Wed Aug 29, 2012 6:07 pm

Good info on the jigsaw. I was thinking I'd need a big bandsaw but if a GOOD jigsaw will work (and I understand that Bosch is one of the best), then maybe the dollars budgeted for the Delta band saw will go to a good vacuum pump. I really want to bag my SUP so if I can get one in time and you want to use it, it's yours to use. Have you started your clamp collection yet?

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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Tue Sep 04, 2012 6:13 pm

Update and a picture

Well over the weekend I managed to get quite a few parts laid out and cut. Didn't get to sanding any of them yet. Still have several more boards to make parts from. Unfortunately, one part is jinxed. The first time I made it (initial go around) I cut it too close to the line. So When I was laying out parts yesterday, I had room for this part on the board. Got it laid out nice and then today I was cutting it out. I started by cutting the scrap off the end.

When the scrap hit the floor it broke into two pieces. Hmmmm. Took a closer look at the part, and sure enough, there's a split down the middle about 6 inches long on one end. In the photo it's the third part from the right at the bottom.

Since I will have to buy more lumber to finish the frames anyway, it shouldn't be too much trouble to fit a third try in on this one part. Only wish I would have noticed the split earlier (like when I purchased the board!!!)

I checked out the other parts from the board and they appear to be okay but you can bet I will pay closer attention to this on the next piece.
Attachments
Frame_Parts_Sept4_2012.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Sat Sep 08, 2012 3:05 pm

I am having a bit of a problem figuring out the layout of a frame piece. IN order to explain it, it will take a bit of words, so bear with me.

I'm in the process of laying out the side piece for frame 4 from the plans. Frames 1 through 4 all have inner edges that must ultimately line up because the carling rail (which the cabin attaches to) is located on the inner edge of these frames. See the following picture from the plans. Notice how the carling lays on the inner edge of the side piece from frame 4. Also notice that this piece has a hook on the inner edge approximately half way down giving the piece the appearance of an "apostrophe" or a "comma"

Frame_4_Sectional.jpg


Through a little bit of searching and deduction I determined that this hook point on the inner edge is a little over 20 inches from the top of the part. The building plans state that the minimum width on these parts is 3" which means the hook portion should be at least 3" wide. Now at this point you should know that my full size patterns do not include inner edges. Rather, I am told to measure a minimum of 3" from the outer edge and then draw a straight line for the inner edge that is at least 3" from the outer edge. This is fine for all the other frame parts. None of them have this hook.

Now another piece of information you need to know. The full size patterns do show the carling point. This point conveniently lines up with the carling points of the other frames which allows me to draw a straight line and establish the inner edge of the wide portion of the frame part. However, here is the rub. Look at this next picture of frame 2.

Frame_2_Sectional.jpg


Notice how the carling on this piece is not laying on the edge of the frame part but is actually laying on a step cut into the part. Yet in the layout sectional for this frame (on another sheet) the carling IS laying on the edge. In fact all the frames are shown that way on the layout sectional sheet. The next picture illustrates this.

Frame_4_Layout_Sectional.jpg


Now remember that the inner edge of these parts must be lined up so the carling will attach to each without any bending. The confusion here is which is correct? Should the carling lie on the edge or lie on a step cut into the edge. The building plans say (in words) that it is on the edge, but the drawing definitely shows it on a step (at least in one view of the part).

Where this part lays is important and affects what I was getting to at the beginning of this post. I need to establish where this inner edge is because I need to draw a straight line done and intersect the inner edge of the hook. I also need to know how wide the part actually is because if I cut it out so that the carling is on the edge and it turns out that it should have been on a step, then my part is too narrow.

Now having said all of that, I think the evidence is pointing to the carling lying on the edge rather than a step. I guess what I am trying to get is some assurance that the inner edge of the part is not critical as long as the carling ends up at the point it is supposed to.

Anyone have anything to say about this. I would appreciate comments. Thanks.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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DrBryanJ
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby DrBryanJ » Sat Sep 08, 2012 5:35 pm

If I am understanding this correctly, I would measure from the center line to the carling. If the distance should be equal at all frames, and you know the outside dimensions of the frames, you should be able to figure the distance from the carling to the outside edge of the frame. If it is less than 3 inches, set into the frame. If greater than 3 inches set it on the side.

Bryan
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Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

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belphil
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby belphil » Sat Sep 08, 2012 6:07 pm

Carl,

I suggest you check the measurement on sheet 4 of 5 you will see that the carlings to the frames 1,2,3 and 4 are on the edge at a distance of 36" from the centerline.

Also the plan shows the distance from centerline to the outside edge of the frame, thus substracting 36" and width of the carling will give you the width of each frame. e.g frame 3 the distance from outside frame edge to centerline is 47" and from inside frame with carling to centerline is 36", thus I deduct that frame 3 width will be 11" - carling width.

Hope it helps.
JB
Happy sailing

JB
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belphil
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby belphil » Sat Sep 08, 2012 6:10 pm

Carl,
Here plan of frame 3
JB
fram3.JPG
Happy sailing

JB
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby belphil » Sun Sep 09, 2012 4:20 am

Carl, looking closer to the plan, all frames except 5 and 6 have the same 36" distance from centerline to the edge of the carling thus I will not add a notch on frame 4 for the carling. Probably a mistake on the plan! anyway carling will be added when the hull is turned over and not to be worried for now. The frame can always be cut later if needed.
Happy sailing

JB
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:35 am

belphil wrote:I suggest you check the measurement on sheet 4 of 5 you will see that the carlings to the frames 1,2,3 and 4 are on the edge at a distance of 36" from the centerline.

Also the plan shows the distance from centerline to the outside edge of the frame, thus substracting 36" and width of the carling will give you the width of each frame. e.g frame 3 the distance from outside frame edge to centerline is 47" and from inside frame with carling to centerline is 36", thus I deduct that frame 3 width will be 11" - carling width.


Hi JB

I saw these measurements and did use them to consider the final inner line of frame 4. The full size patterns show the carling point which I assumed to be the innermost point of the carling. So I subtracted 3/4 " from that to allow for the carling thickness (assumes final thickness of 1" stock) and drew my line from there.

However, one thing I neglected to do was actually measure that distance afterwards. I assumed that it was correct. It turns out that the patterns are off by 1/4". If you measure perpendicular to the inner line back to the outer point of frame 4 on the pattern, it measures 10 3/4", but by the sectional drawings this should be 11". If you subtract the carling thickness from 11" inches you should have a final width at the top of 10 1/4" but my parts were 10".

Fortunately I had not cut them out yet and they were not too tightly nested on the board. I was able to move the line out the 1/4".

I feel this is safer. If it turns out later when I go to put the carlings in that the dimension from center is less than 36", I can remove it from the inner frame. But I don't think this is the case.

So double check your own patterns and you'll see what I was talking about.

By the way, I was trying to determine where the inner line makes the bend and I found a measurement on one of the other sheets that showed the top (or perhaps the bottom - don't have my plans here next to the computer) of the seat cushion to be 21" from the baseline below the boat.Looking at one of the interior sectionals on frame 4 seems to show the seat cushion top at approximately the same point as the bend in the inner line of frame 4. Knowing the seat cushions are 4" in height and using the overall height of the frame from the baseline I was able to deduce that the bend point is at 20 15/16" from the top most corner of frame 4.

This may not be completely accurate but I think in this area it will be okay. I'm pretty sure that the most critical dimension is the 36" from center line that we were discussing earlier.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:55 am

mrintense wrote:The full size patterns show the carling point which I assumed to be the innermost point of the carling. So I subtracted 3/4 " from that to allow for the carling thickness (assumes final thickness of 1" stock) and drew my line from there.


JB,

I've been thinking some more about this. If the carling point on the full size patterns is actually the outer edge of the carling (rather than the inner edge as I mentioned previously), that means the inner frame line would be 11 1/2" from the outer point of the frame and you would have to cut a 1/2" step in the frame part for the carling to rest on to get the final inner dimension of 36".

What do you think about this?

For me if I go this route, then I have to start over and re lay out the parts. I'm wondering if this step in the inner frame edge is necessary.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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belphil
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Postby belphil » Sun Sep 09, 2012 7:35 am

Carl,

Personally I will not cut yet the step for the carling and will go on the safe side. It is better to have a frame wider then short as can always remove material later on but it will be harder to add. I think all measurements are for indication and can be deviated from the plan but what is important is the outside and floor timber.

By the way I have started to make a model of the Vera 1ft=1" as per the plan. This will give me some experience and will learn from mistake and hopefully will be easier to build the real thing.
Happy sailing

JB
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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:58 am

Well I decided to err on the side of too much material on the frame parts I mentioned in my last post. Can always remove it if necessary.

I've started sanding the parts to their final shape. My blog goes into more detail on this but the gist of it is that I am temporarily attaching like parts together and sanding them at the same time. This way I can insure that both parts are identically shaped. It requires a little prep work to line the parts up and them using drywall screws to hold the parts together.

Here are some pictures showing one set of parts in process. I'll be filling the holes later with epoxy.

true_up_1.jpg


true_up_2.jpg


true_up_3.jpg
Last edited by mrintense on Wed Sep 12, 2012 5:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:59 am

Here is the last picture showing the line I'll be sanding to

true_up_4.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:12 pm

And here is the result on one set of parts. This is actually two parts but looks like one.

Having fun. Building this boat is one of the better decisions I've made in my life!!!

true_up_5.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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mrintense
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Building The Vera Cruise

Postby mrintense » Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:20 pm

Well, I've completed the sanding to shape of the frame parts that I had material for. I haven't made the cutouts for the keel, chine, sheer, or battens yet but I couldn't resist laying the parts out in their assembled shape. Still lots of work left to be done on the frames including designing, laying out, cutting out, and sanding the gussets. Then of course assembly.

Anyway, here are a few teaser images.

frame2.jpg


frame4.jpg


frame5.jpg
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build


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