frame material, geronimo design

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bobinpowayca
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frame material, geronimo design

Post by bobinpowayca » Mon Jan 21, 2013 12:50 pm

Hi, I'm about to order plans for either the Geronimo or Malalhini. I built the Glen-L 17 30 years ago but had the advantage of the frame kit. Now I'm retired and want to build a runabout.
First question - I want to buy material for the frames this week so I can get started. I know I will need "one inch material"; probably dark red mahogany if it's available - any ideas on alternative material? What I'm wondering is if I should make an effort to find material finished as closely as possible to the full one inch thick? I know most one inch material at stores is usually 3/4 inch. I know of a good hardwood lumber store in my area (San Diego). So, should I make an effort to get material as close to a full one inch, or if what's available is only 3/4 inch will that be adequate for the frames?
Also - I've been looking at all the pictures I can find of both the Malahini and the Geronimo trying to get a feel for which hull might be the easier/quicker build for me - not a self-confidence issue but a realistic question, I'm 65 and will be working pretty much alone so issues such as bending planking are a concern, and I want to finish the boat in a couple of years. For example the Malahini seems to have more curvature in the hull. I see in the pictures the Malahini's hull is smooth whereas all the pictures of Geronimo show a cap or strip the length of the hull on the outside at the chine, and another from the tip of the bow all the way aft along the keel. Anyone know what this strip is - is it like a 1x2 - is this something you add to the hull AFTER the hull is fiberglassed, then encapsulate? Thanks for any help!

Bob
Bob
_______________
Built the Glen-L 17 (1988), Geronimo (2018)
PBR support (1968)

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ttownshaw
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Re: frame material, geronimo design

Post by ttownshaw » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:19 pm

White Oak can be used for the frame material and is usually readily available in most of the States.

Regarding the Geronimo. It looks to me like the strip that runs along the stem and keel is part of the frame material...similar to a boat I'm restoring. The side and bottom planking meet at this strip. I could be wrong but that's my opinion. The strips along the chine are spray rails...I have them on my Malahini and they work great...ugly, but very effective.
Bill

I told my wife we needed a three-car garage for my projects...she told me to ask her for permission next time before I buy a house.
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DrBryanJ
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Re: frame material, geronimo design

Post by DrBryanJ » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:27 pm

I am building a malahini. I am currently working on frames, so I haven't tried to bend plywood yet. I am also doing most of the work alone. I can recruit my wife for very short times if I need an extra hand. I ordered african mahogany that was 4/4 stock and had it planed on both sides. It came out to about 7/8 in, but down to 3/4 is fine.

Any spray rails or lift strakes or skegs are added to the hull after the hull is fiberglassed. Both pieces on the geranimo would fall into that catagory.

Bryan
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."
We're still happily married, but now she just wants "the dam boat out of the garage."

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: frame material, geronimo design

Post by Bill Edmundson » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:31 pm

I disagree about the spray rails being ugly, makes for vintage look :!: What is ugly is a wet mad wife or being wet in cold weather :!:

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

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ttownshaw
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Re: frame material, geronimo design

Post by ttownshaw » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:36 pm

Bryan,

Exactly right on the skegs, spray rails regarding fiberglassing prior to them being applied...however, on the Geronimo it looks to have a centerline external stem/keel running the full length of the boat. The one I'm restoring is exactly like this. Fiberglass is applied up to the edge of this piece and trimmed in place.

I'm 95% done with my Malahini...unless I come up with more stuff to change lol.

I also used some Khaya and Sapelli in my build...both are acceptable as well but harder to get in straight grains.
Bill

I told my wife we needed a three-car garage for my projects...she told me to ask her for permission next time before I buy a house.
http://www.unitybuild.net

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ttownshaw
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Re: frame material, geronimo design

Post by ttownshaw » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:39 pm

Bill...you always crack me up :lol: :lol: :lol:

I think the rails are ugly on my boat where they meet at the bow...I just couldn't figure out a way to taper them in a way that was pleasing so I put them on full dimension and full length.

Sorry for the hyjack.
Bill

I told my wife we needed a three-car garage for my projects...she told me to ask her for permission next time before I buy a house.
http://www.unitybuild.net

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Iggy
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Re: frame material, geronimo design

Post by Iggy » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:47 pm

Malahini and Geronimo are basically the same shape and frames, so there is no real advantage in speed one compared to the other that I can imagine. The Malahini has a fairly curved transom, but well within the reach of a strong clamp.

The trick is to have a LOT of clamps to act as extra hands during construction. There are a few steps where you might actually need a 2nd pair of 'real' hands, namely the chine, the plywood (depending on sheet sizes) and flipping, etc. I had a combination of regular and quick-grip type clamps, they both are very handy depending on what you where doing. About 3 dozen clamps near the end of my build.

Frame materials I've seen (or used) is: Khaya or Sapelle (both are Mahogany relatives, strong, easy to work, rot resistant, pretty as well) or White Oak (easier to find but heavier). My Malahini used 130 board feet of 1" Sapelle in the end, including seating/bench I made.

I bought 130 board feet of 1" quatersawn random/random Sapelle, had it planed down to 13/16" thick with 1 straight edge per board, then packaged and shipped to a nearby depot where I picked it up. Worked out great, ready to cut on my table saw.

My spray rails and gunwhales are solid lumber (Sapelle again), encapsulated in epoxy (but not fiberglassed), and clear-coated for UV protection. When they get damaged, I simply re-epoxy the exposed wood and use some clear touch-up paint to seal it again. I did fiberglass my skeg, which was a bit of a chore, and ironically I have not hit a single thing with my skeg so far (knock wood) so I have no idea how well it will stand up. My spray rails, rub rails and gunwhales have been a bit beaten-up from trailering and crappy boat docks, but otherwise not worse for wear.
Ian (aka Iggy)
My Malahini Build

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