Monaco Caper

Designs for inboard or outboard power

Moderator: BruceDow

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Mon Apr 29, 2013 8:48 am

Billy,

Thanks for the tip. Will do that . Also, resawing went great with the 2/3 tpi blade from Timberwolf. Thanks for the
help on that also.

Fred

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Mon May 06, 2013 1:03 pm

One week , and one day, one side mahogany planked. Results, priceless.

Satisfied with spiling after I got into it. In fact, think I became more and more particular as I went along. It is not perfect as I do have a few gaps of maybe 1/32" or less, but they are minimal.

Started by using the trim router and jig to actually put a power scribe and groove , but found that I still spent
a lot of time hand finishing . Past the second row (starting at the and working toward the sheer), I reverted back to
a pencil and dividers, then taped up to the line using blue painters tape, planed, and sanded to the tape, trial fitted,
then did a final fitting starting at one end and using a cabinet scraper and sandpaper, worked my way to the other end.

For me , this seemed best, albeit maybe a little slow to some. Also, starting at the chine and working to the sheer ,
may be the harder way to do it. Would have been better I think letting the previous row support the new one, when spiling especially. Also, last row would have been on my feet at the chine, rather than my back at the sheer.

Did end up resawing a couple of wider planks for the bow area using the classic method of installing.

Time to clean the shop up, clean off the tools, and rest up for the second side.
Attachments
IMG_0741.JPG
port side on, not trimmed. Tools everywhere! Time to clean up.
IMG_0736.JPG
12 1/8" max width on bandsaw
IMG_0734.JPG
used painters tape to help see the lines.

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Sun May 26, 2013 6:00 am

New boat building rule:

Never mix epoxy using the push pumps while at the same time listening to war movies on Memorial Day weekend.

This morning I am laying on another mahog lam while listening to "Run Silent, Run Deep" (1958), a classic.

Unfortunately, while I am counting my pumps of resin from 1 to 10, the Sub Captain is yelling : Fire 1, fire 2, fire 3,
fire 4, or doing a countdown on how long til the torpedo hits the target 10, 9 8 , 7 , 6 etc.

Needless to say, it confused me. :( and I lost a couple of batches of epoxy.

neel thompson
Posts: 1224
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 2:33 pm
Location: Collegeville, Pa

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby neel thompson » Sun May 26, 2013 8:20 am

Very nice job on the spiling Fred. I didn't have much luck using the trim router either. What I found helpful was to start at the sheer, tack the first piece along the sheer without glue, and placing the next row behind the first row and marking the bottom edge of that row. Then glue the first row down. You have to use your imagination to figure out how to mark the top of the row, but your lower joints will be perfect. You could start at the chine and go down, but gravity is not helping you here. Good luck with the planking....Neel

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Sun May 26, 2013 11:18 am

Thanks Neel. I have just started the 4th row on the starboard side, one more after that. Then the bottom final lams.

I totally agree with your technique. I wish I would have gone that route. I started at the chine and worked toward the
floor.

I have been fighting the gravity on each row. I do have bar clamps which are
also spreaders by Irwin. They help me immensely putting upward pressure on the strake against the previous row.
This helps , after scribing, cutting and sanding to the line, I then start at one end and slowly work my way to the other
scraping or sanding along the way to make a good fit.

It certainly isn't perfect, but is as good as I can do.


I am worried about where the side mahog lams and bottom mahog lams meet up near the stem, where the transition was. I think I will trim off the side lams a little long there and sneak up on the correct angle for where the bottom will overlap the sides to make a butt joint. This is a very visible joint from the stem back along the chine about 2 to 3 feet.


Any other tips out there will be helpful.

neel thompson
Posts: 1224
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 2:33 pm
Location: Collegeville, Pa

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby neel thompson » Sun May 26, 2013 2:45 pm

Fred, I think you are talking about the point down the chine where the bottom stops being the side and starts actually being the bottom. I will attach the best picture I have for that area. You may be able to see that at that point, and aft, the bottom plank will actually lap over the side plank and be trimmed later. At the joint, and forward of it, the bottom plank actually meets up with the side plank. I really worried about this, but in the end, it really isn't that big of a deal. If that isn't the joint you are talking about, sorry for the verbage.....Neel
Attachments
005.JPG

User avatar
billy c
Posts: 2274
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 7:59 pm
Location: NH
Contact:

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby billy c » Sun May 26, 2013 4:28 pm

Fred your boat is coming along real well. glad that the bandsaw cooperated for you. looks like the strakes are coming together well for you also.
on the transition at the stem, a lap joint works fine for that and if you are really fussy (me) can fit a short area with a miter on the bottom strake where it is visible and not covered by the boot stripe and bottom paint
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Sun May 26, 2013 5:14 pm

Neel , that is exactly what I am talking about. From about 2 to 3 feet back from the stem, where the side and bottom are somewhat the same, looking at my elevations the bootstripe and bottom paint will not cover that joint so like you am worried about it. Your photo gave me the idea to do it your way.

Billy , you mentioned a possible mitre joint from that point to the stem.. I don't think I can do that since my side lams are already on ,(see my previous photo) but I did leave them proud about 2 inches at that area.

So I think what I may do is to do a transition joint like yours Neel, and overlap the bottom over the side lams from there to the transom. From that point forward , I will attempt to spile and somewhat angle cut the edge of the bottom lam to the side lam that is sticking up and butt it up to the side.

I will definitely have to make several pattern attempts to get it right. I can then trim to let the side lam lap the bottom lam . That should make a respectable joint. I hope.

If I didn't have the side already in place, I would spend some time attempting to mitre but, don't think Billy I would have your patience. That would be one tough fit I think.

These lams seem to be taking me forever to get them how I want them. Sometimes I just have to walk away for a day or two.


I think I read where someone said you won't see it at 40 mph anyway! But I will know.

Thanks for all the help.

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Wed Jun 12, 2013 8:55 am

Found a new way to find left over staples or staple legs: Put a new belt on your sander. When the belt rips, mark the spot, pull the staple. Put another new belt on. :roll:

First rough sanding complete. I think my 8 pound belt sander now weighs twice that, at least according to my arms and back.

I keep waiting for the Glen L forum traveling sanding team to show up. :) But I must have dreamed that.

From what I have read here, shouldn't rush this stage of the job until it is as fair as I can possibly get it.
Attachments
IMG_0863.JPG

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:13 pm

Need advice on a possible problem.

Spent 1 1/2 weeks finishing sanding of mahogany today, getting it down to 80 grit for a couple coats of epoxy .

Filled staple holes and other small defects, feeling good. Took a spray bottle of water to double check for any other problems and found this, (see photos)which seemingly I have been not paying attention to .

I have 3 lams which are showing what I first thought were belt sanding marks. But after closer inspection, it seems all of them are from the same board prior to resawing. I was able to identify several matching patterns where the same
vertical marks would line up if the boards were removed and stacked back together.

I attempted to further sand a few areas to see if it could be removed, but seems it is all the way through .

With two coats of epoxy base, and many coats of varnish, I think it will remain visible. I wasn't planning of staining.

Options?

1. Leave it alone (am I too fussy?)
2. Seal to even color then water or alcohol stain
3. Attempt to continue sanding (May have 3/32" left)
4. Remove lams (ouch)

Appreciate any and all advice.

Thanks
Attachments
resaw marks.jpg
showing matching areas on different lams
IMG_0902.JPG
water sprayed on area
IMG_0895.JPG

Trackhappy
Posts: 1412
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 5:42 pm
Location: Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. Building Gentry.

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby Trackhappy » Tue Jun 18, 2013 3:47 pm

That's a tough one. If they don't sand out then they are in the grain of the wood rather than surface imperfections I guess. It is probable that as the timber colours up over time they will even up and disappear, but I can't guarantee that. I gather the process of colouring up is oils coming to the surface, so maybe the sawing squeezed or heated the oils out in those spots and it will eventually come back. Depending on your time frame, you could leave it for a few weeks to see if it gets better and make a further decision then.
By the time I have built a boat, I'll be ready to build a boat....

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Tue Jun 18, 2013 4:05 pm

Thanks,

Yes, I missed the board. :oops: Really think it is some sort of quarter sawn hybrid or something, because sanding is no longer a option. Those grain markings go completely through the original board. Didn't really become noticeable until the final 80 grit , then of course the water made them spring out. Roller coaster of emotions today, finishing the initial sanding , then seeing that. Lost my poise. :roll:

I have a couple of weeks no while I prep the bottom and glass. Will see what happens to it. It really isn't that bad, it's just different, and all around the same area.

Meanwhile will look into the different stain options to see if those are viable, or if just leave it , to create another drinking story. :)

User avatar
billy c
Posts: 2274
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 7:59 pm
Location: NH
Contact:

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby billy c » Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:42 pm

hi Fred-
it is what we call "mottle". found it quite a few times in my guitar building and was prized for it's unique quality. can see where in a strake it may not be what you want but it is is so! you are the one that will notice it more than anyone else.
if you want to minimize the difference, stain with careful wiping after application is the answer. a good one is SolarLux made by Behlen. also sanding out to 220 and then roughing the lighter sections between the darker blocking will allow those areas to take more color and blend. PM me if you have any desire to try this as i can give you a number of things without the sermon here :D
...or just leave it alone and tell everyone who asks that it is called block mottle and very desirable :wink:
=Billy
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

fredt
Posts: 162
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:05 am
Location: Homosassa, FL

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby fredt » Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:57 pm

Billy,

You are my savior! Can't believe I didn't see it while resawing or applying the strakes. Anyway, I can turn what was discouraging earlier today to something very unique? I like that idea.

May even embellish the story , say I got some illegal foreign guitar wood from Gibson or something. It may get better with a few drinks. :)

I do understand your comments about staining. Just been reading the forum on different Classic Red Mahogany stain on the sides. Wondering if that would cover it. But , really didn't
want to stain anything on this boat. Just use woods for contrast. Maybe a little bleaching .

It has also been suggested that it may blend in or darken with a little time.

Per your suggestion , I will leave it alone. I can rest now.

Thanks Billy, and all.

User avatar
jenko
Posts: 858
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 2:50 am
Location: Pine Mountain . Vic . Australia
Contact:

Re: Monaco Caper

Postby jenko » Wed Jun 19, 2013 12:27 am

I had the same marks on some of my veneer boards,was also concerned , put seal coat of epoxy on and they stood out even more2 months later I can hardly see them,so don't worry. After all is said and done it is wood and the grain pattern is random, that is what gives it the character. :)


Return to “Power Boats”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests