?'s about the Big Hunk

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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wdicken
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 12:14 pm
Location: Alabama

? on the Hunk

Postby wdicken » Wed Nov 15, 2006 2:41 pm

It is 23ft hunk, running with a 50hp. Jumped up on the step pretty quick and ran fast for the short time I had it open. Probably about 20mph which in the distance I was running was quite good. I was pretty light (me and the net) so I ran pretty high. I took it out in the gulf (started in Perdido bay) just far enough to get a feel for it.

Thanks

RobB
Posts: 73
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:20 pm
Location: Memphis

Postby RobB » Fri Nov 17, 2006 6:07 pm

:shock: WOW, with just a 50 hp. So a 100 or 125 should push my 29'er real good huh :D
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.

folesriver
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 7:47 am
Location: Newburyport, MA

Postby folesriver » Tue Jan 16, 2007 6:07 pm

Rob, did you receive the picture I sent of the big hunk before tear down?
Have you had any progress as of yet? I have a new trunk cabin set up and am working on a windshield. Just bought 70 copies of old wooden boat magazine off craig's list which is giving a huge amount of help. It's deep freeze here but once I can yank the tent down I'll get some pictures of the framing and what not.
John

RobB
Posts: 73
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:20 pm
Location: Memphis

Postby RobB » Wed Jan 17, 2007 10:01 am

:D Yes I did. I have been at a stand still, therapy on my foot has been a bear. :( Trying to adjust to a new leg brace. Doc says I wont even know its there in 2 months. Ordered sissy do plans for me and my kids to build together as a learning experience. Its cold here right now but it wont last more than a week or two more. Cant wait to get the pics of your progress. I may buy a digital camera so I can post pics of my project once I'm back on my feet.
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.

basilkies
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:19 pm
Location: Marin California

Postby basilkies » Wed Jan 17, 2007 4:35 pm

I built the Vee Dory to spec at 23'. The only real difference to the Big Hunk is the nose is veed in mine.

I have the well style with a 90 horse Evenrude E-Tec. Since the motor has a large flat plate over the prop, I had to mount it a bit low so the plate would not hit the sides when I turned. I think this has to increase the drag and gas mileage. I get around 6 gallons an hour at cruising speed and a top end of 31 mph. In a slightly rough sea the boat likes to go around 12 to 14 knots.

The boat is extremely stable so a cabin shouldn't be any problem. The dory style sloped sides really help keep the boat from rocking side to side. Combined with the flat bottom you should do fine.

As for the aforementioned issue of two bilge pumps to keep both sides of the boat dry either side of the well. The problem is not water that comes up through the well, any water that splashes into the boat will make it's way on either side. Personally, I like having two bilge pumps, but the boat is pretty dry to operate. The sides tend to direct the spray out. The only water I get is created by how the transducer is mounted or the speedometer pitok. They direct water over the side of the well.

My advice is, screw the speedometer pitok, because those speedometers are pretty inaccurate. I find my gps more convenient to use for that. You can figure out the currents' speed by going both directions at the same rpms and subtracting.

Some other things I would have done different:

1) When you sheet the hull, scarf the joints instead of using butt blocks. The butt blocks dam up water in the boat. Otherwise build access to the butt blocks through your floor for access to drain the water.

2) Be super careful when you mount the transom to get your bottom level from side to side. I forget the reason but it is a common problem for the bottom to get out of level at this step. If it is off, level it with some type of filler before you tip the hull over. It's four times tougher to work on the bottom when you have to crawl under the boat.

3) If you work in a garage consider how you plan to turn the boat over. I thought I'd just flip it in the garage, till one day I held a frame up and realized it was too wide to flip. Twelve people helped me solve that problem. My advice is build with the bow at the door.

4) Laminate the sheers and carlings, use two pieces to get to the thickness. It will make bending them a lot easier.

5) Consider how you want to build the floor and run the steering cables and electronic wires at the same time. If I did it again I would either use two inch wider lumber when I built the frames to allow for drilling holes for the cables, or epoxy some spacers to them to raise the floor.

6) Get yourself a cheap power planer, that saved me more time than any other tool.

7) Don't be afraid of mistakes, epoxy will fix anything!

8) After you stare at the plans about 30 times, go ahead and put the sides on without attaching them to the frames. That's how it works.

basilkies
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:19 pm
Location: Marin California

Postby basilkies » Wed Jan 17, 2007 4:42 pm

Oh, yeah, Doug Fir will work fine, that's all they use to build dorys in Pacific City Oregon and they launch through the surf. Just make sure it has 8 or more rings per inch for structual pieces

RobB
Posts: 73
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:20 pm
Location: Memphis

Postby RobB » Wed Jan 17, 2007 5:40 pm

:lol: :shock: :lol: Wow your as good as the book :!: Yeah about the garage, I got real lucky, had to get in the rafters to store some stuff and knew I couldn't flip it cause my 10' step ladder was 8'' above them. You have given me some great info to consider, thanks. Ohhh and some advise for you in return, If you get the chance to fall off a telephone pole and crush your heel, PASS :!: . Wish I had :oops: .
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.

basilkies
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:19 pm
Location: Marin California

Postby basilkies » Fri Jan 19, 2007 4:09 pm

RobB wrote::lol: :shock: :lol: Wow your as good as the book :!: Yeah about the garage, I got real lucky, had to get in the rafters to store some stuff and knew I couldn't flip it cause my 10' step ladder was 8'' above them. You have given me some great info to consider, thanks. Ohhh and some advise for you in return, If you get the chance to fall off a telephone pole and crush your heel, PASS :!: . Wish I had :oops: .


If that puts you on paid leave, you can make the best of it, the first thing to do on the boat is start the frames. It's light work and is the first thing you do anyway.

John Rigney
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2006 7:42 pm
Location: Fort Chipewyan Alberta Canada
Contact:

Big Hunk

Postby John Rigney » Mon Apr 02, 2007 1:09 pm

I built a big hunk in 1992 and it has served me very well. Powered by 135 hp Merc outboard on transom mount. I have worn out two motors (1,000 hours each) and am re-powering again with a 135 Optimax this summer.

As a commercial fishing boat you might find it hard to hold in the wind while lifting pots, it floats right on top and the wind really blows it around. I mounted my cabin on the back to take advantage of the softer ride at the rear. You might get shaken to pieces riding at the front, this is a flat bottom boat that does not cut the waves but rides right on top of them.

My boating on the Athabasca River delta regularly takes me into water shallower than 3 feet and that is where this boat outshines any other I have seen. The Big Hunk has a draft of about 8 inches.

The boat is very strong, built with good materials and lots of epoxy. It often sees rough chop for hours on end at full throttle and is still as good as new. With 135 hp and a 15-inch steel prop this boat easily lifts and planes with a load of 7 filled gas drums. Normal cruising speed with the 15-inch prop is 28 mph at 4600 rpm. With 7 drums of gas it cruises at 26 mph at 4800 rpm.

I've tried lots of props and the 15" 3-blade Mercury Mirage clearly outperforms all others for efficiency, lifting, and reverse thrust.

The boat is in the water from May 15 to October 20, our ice-free season, and has never developed a leak or bad joint. Each spring I repair any tears or punctures in the fibreglass and planking,


If I had a $50,000 aluminum speedboat like most of my friends, I would still use the Big Hunk most of the time, that is how much I like it.

RobB
Posts: 73
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:20 pm
Location: Memphis

Postby RobB » Thu Apr 05, 2007 8:56 am

Thanks, I am looking forward to getting on mine this spring. You mentioned 7 drums of fuel, what size drums, and what kind of range are you getting? The prop in fo is very much appreciated. Ohh did you build to the plans or add a frame to increase LOA?
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.


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