Chugalug's BoJest

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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chugalug
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Chugalug's BoJest

Postby chugalug » Sat Nov 29, 2014 6:02 pm

:?: I built a Bo jest hull using red oak frames and 2layers of AC exterior ply. Better to burn it now or finish with other matterials?Not fibreglassed yet so won"t be out too much. :cry:

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billy c
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Re: wood and materials

Postby billy c » Sun Nov 30, 2014 6:23 am

Chug-
tough call on that, but if you are having remorse now, guess it should head to the burn pile, take a breather and make a fresh start. lots of hours are required to complete a boat like the Bo-Jest, so you might as well get quality materials and produce a safe and easy to maintain boat.
...post your location as there may be builders near you that can help you source materials.
-Billy
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:09 am

:o Guess I didn't do enough research. I just wanted to build something to only last a few years. I like the Bo-jest build .The front was kind of a beast since I might have goofed on stem angle slightly.Didn't know that red oak rots so quickly or will it last a few years if I encapsulate it with epoxy. there is a small boo-boo on the front left side as the 2nd ply layer cracked a little spot on the front . it's above waterline.fixable?I just wanted to use it as a small camping boat not as a show boat. :roll:

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billy c
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Re: wood and materials

Postby billy c » Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:22 am

sounds like you are at least building and understanding the bigger picture :)
IMO it would last quite a few years especially if encapsulated. i have built a few smaller boats with cheap materials, they do ok ...i have found voids that have to be filled and patched after a few years when they get water intrusion and bubble up. pretty easy to grind out and patch on a small 8' tender, but lots more difficulty when you have a sole, cabin and limited access to do repair.
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

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mrintense
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Re: wood and materials

Postby mrintense » Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:33 am

A possible alternative is to complete the boat as a open boat (no cabin - center console?). Do the minimum needed to get it licensed and on the water. Encapsulate it so that you get some use out of it. Use it to keep you're boating needs satisfied for a few years while you start another boat. Build the second boat using a design you really want and use the materials you feel are best.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:46 am

:) Wanted to keep the floor at all one level.maybe Ican make it so its removable later,not glassed in. will have to use my noodle on this one.Kinda hard to do anything now as the boat is in an uninsulated shed,and its below 0 outside right now.so it will be awhile be fore I get to it again.Maybe I'll start carving a model of the boat I want out of a chunk of butternut a friend gave me.I'm up on Lake of the Woods,and have lots of scenic bays and crooks and crannies Iwant to explore.Just have to keep dreamin' I guess. :D

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:49 am

:D Just for fun,I when I built the transom I figured there might be some wavering? if I made it straight across so when I laminated it together I bent it over a small pipe ine ceter and outwarsd on each side so I would have a small bow outwards .Idon't think its enough to bother the outboard motor. I currently have a low-profile 15 horse Evinrude,I know that there is the 9.9. What's the diff. :roll:

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:01 pm

:D Picked up allthe lumber and insulation today Will start putting that in the boat shed .It won't be long,I'll be working on the boat again :roll:

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Fri Dec 05, 2014 7:02 am

:D How much cpes to coat inside of standard size Bo-Jest? or do I just seal the oak. :roll:Smiths or restor-it?
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

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Andy Garrett
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Re: wood and materials

Postby Andy Garrett » Fri Dec 05, 2014 9:43 am

When I first read this, I winced! My first reaction was, "BURN IT!"

HOWEVER..., that opinion is based on MY experience. My Zip moves across very rough midwest waters mostly on holiday weekends, and near 30mph. The violent slapping of the forward hull against wakes and swells can be quite alarming to the occupants. A Zip built of red oak and standard exterior grade plywood--to be used the way mine is used--is absolutely unthinkable.

The issue for me is the ability of the wood to hold the fasteners and bond with the epoxy.

My hull is subject to more violent forces than I ever imagined it would be. I am glad that I hand-selected straight grained, quarter sawn mahogany for every frame and longitudinal member. My stem, transom knee, and transom are made of doubled 3/4" marine grade plywood. My hull ply is Hydrotek. Hydrotek is difficult to work with, but I consider these to be top grade materials where strength and durability are concerned. I also used Glen-L epoxies which are formulated for these woods and solid bronze screws. My frames are double gusseted, etc, etc. My hull is so strong that it never even creaked once when I was standing, squatting, and crawling around in it during the interior build.

YOUR experience will be starkly different.

The Bo Jest is rated for a top speed of 8kts (9.2 mph). The waters up north are typically calmer than those of the wind-swept prairie. Even in rough water, the forces endured by your hull will be vastly less than those endued by higher performance boats. Using quality fasters with carefully predrilled pilot holes and marine epoxies, I would not hesitate to take a ride in your boat when completed. In fact, if I were to build the Bo Jest, I would consider strongly using the same woods you have if I could hand select quarter sawn lumber and premium exterior ply. I might double up on the glass for the hull, but the cost savings would be very tempting.

Bottom line:
Keep going! Your boat will last for a long time if you build it well.
Andy Garrett

Perhaps the slowest Zip build in Glen-L history...

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Fri Dec 05, 2014 1:13 pm

I checked the price of cpes .If I had to get 10gallons and with shipping -that's about the same as new hull.( for the ply any how . Don't know if I need thatmuch How do you apply cpes .The restor stuff they recommend using a garden sprayer and spray it on .I would rather do that if I could.Better than using a brush since there's about a zillion different surfaces on the inside. :roll:Wow a Bo jest can go that fast? I thought that mine would smoke down the bay at 6 mph.If I seal up allthe seams on inside (kinda like stitch and glue fillets) and tape the seams on the bottom , would that help? instead of two entire layers of cloth?

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Fri Dec 05, 2014 7:09 pm

:D I think I found where to get my cpes .there is some you can put on when its colder out ( down to 32) sounds promising.do you epoxy over it or do the paint way?

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: wood and materials

Postby Bill Edmundson » Fri Dec 05, 2014 7:59 pm

I can't imagine needing 10 gals. of CPES. Two gals. max. Probably One.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Fri Dec 05, 2014 8:13 pm

:D Sounds good to me ,they have it a 2 gal kit.I was thinking I would start with six.Wow. I still like the idea of using a pump up garden sprayer . It would ruin the sprayer but that's a small sacrifice.should get smaller kit first as I attached the skeg ant want to use epoxy fillet on each side to round out everything.

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chugalug
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Re: wood and materials

Postby chugalug » Tue Dec 16, 2014 7:53 pm

:D Jamestown advertises a total boat equivalent to cpes;no fumes and can even be thinned with acetone for greater soaking.sent for catalog.I'm thinking hard on it as I'm working in enclosed shop.opinions welcome :roll:
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine


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