Malahini in West Virginia

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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crankie
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Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Tue Apr 21, 2015 10:57 am

Frame with Chines.jpg
Progress so far
Been hanging out on here for a while now and asking questions on my Malahini build. Bob has informed me to make a continuous thread to show my progress and not add individual questions, thanks for the advice and answers.
Anyway, have the frames mounted on building form and laminated in the chines and now continuing with fairing the keel, frames and chines. Here is my latest question, I have faired the #1 & 2 frames as stated in the book as level to the keel and chine angles, but when I go forward to frame #3 how do I handle the fairing of the frame, battens angles well into the keel and chine when bent but how will the bottom ply. lay on the curvicure of this frame?
Attachments
Frame 3.jpg
Frame 2.jpg
Frame 2 faired

crankie
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:19 am

So 1st picture is with batten showing faired nicely as batten is bend over frame 3 and meets with chine and keel angles.
2nd picture is with batten layed on chine and keel angle, but how is frame 3 faired to allow for bottom planking?
Attachments
Frame 3-3.jpg
Frame 3-2.jpg

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rbrandenstein
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby rbrandenstein » Tue Apr 21, 2015 1:39 pm

Looking good.
I don't have the plans in front of me, but I think I remember frames 0, 1, and 2 are pretty straight from the center of the keel to the chine. You have a shallow vee and flat planing surface. Frame 3 has some curve from the keel to the chine and frame 4 more so. The plywood transitions from flat to the curve as it moves forward. Rather than use thin battens, use a piece of 1/4" plywood to check the fairing. Clamp it if necessary but ensure it can follow the curve and make good flush contact on the keel, frames and chine.
If you cut the frames to the plans, there is not much fairing of the frames from side to side. Most of the fairing is at the chine and keel. Frames 3 will need a little off the front of the frame to handle the curve coming down to frame 4. Frame 4 will need more severe fairing on the front to let the plywood bend to the stem. Note that the high portion of each frame should still match the profile of the full size patterns.

If you take too much off, it is easy to epoxy a thin batten where needed and start over. Some folks use some epoxy putty made with resin and wood dust to fill small depressions.
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Completed Malahini (launched 6/24/2012)
http://bobsboatbuild.blogspot.com/

crankie
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Wed Apr 29, 2015 10:40 am

Getting ready to install side ply.planking and have question about fasteners, I have the 3/4" bronze fasteners but how do you countersink the heads in such thin 1/4" ply and then fill over the exposed screw heads?
Thanks

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rbrandenstein
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby rbrandenstein » Wed Apr 29, 2015 1:48 pm

You do not have to countersink. You can drive the screw head below the surface. I suggest you try it on a some samples. Make sure you use pilot holes. I did not use a tapered pilot but used two sizes of straight. One for the shaft and one for the threads. You can find tables for the correct sizes.
If you have the boatbuilding book from Glen, they make a point to ensure the surface of the ply is compressed under the head. If you countersink too much, you will have a very weak attachment as the head will be under the ply surface.

Also, I used regular steel screws to set the hole and compress the ply, then replace with silicon bronze screws. The SB screws will twist off too easily, so use the steel screws to get it done and then replace.
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Completed Malahini (launched 6/24/2012)
http://bobsboatbuild.blogspot.com/

crankie
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Thu Apr 30, 2015 9:50 am

Bob
Thanks again for your advice. Yes I have the book and seen the information of compressing the ply but was wondering if this will sink the head deep enough to fill the screw hole or is it best to leave the bronze head showing and just expoxy over?, I am going to attempt bright side finish. I also have been using the 2 drill bits for bronze screw and also add wax to threads before driving which really reduced striped screws.
Chris

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mrintense
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby mrintense » Thu Apr 30, 2015 2:15 pm

I wanted to add a bit about the use of fasteners. I also use steel fasteners for initial installation and include small disposable plywood washers ( with wax paper between them and the skin) to protect the skin. I wait for a few hours and then go back and replace all the screws with the silicon bronze screws, eliminating the plywood washers at the same time. The screws are driven to slightly below the surface of the skin (with no countersinking).

My boat is being painted (no bright finishes except maybe the deck and transom) so covering the screw heads will be a different process than you might use.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

crankie
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Tue May 05, 2015 8:13 am

Getting ready to install side planking as I think I have the fairing under control. Thinking that I would resaw some solid mahogany and plane to 1/8" to veneer to sides for a more traditional look, is there as issue with leaving bottom with 3/8 ply (then painting) and having the veneer on just the sides?
Chris

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rbrandenstein
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby rbrandenstein » Tue May 05, 2015 11:57 am

We need some more pictures.

Roberta put a 1/8 mahogany veneer on her Zip. You can find her thread and follow her build.
Since the bottom and the side, up to the waterline, will be painted, you can leave the bottom plywood. Note, however, that the true waterline at the stem is below the chine, so if you want mahogany to the true waterline, you will have veneer over the chine and partially onto the bottom.

Many of the builders of a plywood sided hulls that kept them bright keep the water line above the chine so the bottom paint covers the screw holes and filler used at the chine.
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Completed Malahini (launched 6/24/2012)
http://bobsboatbuild.blogspot.com/

crankie
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Fri May 15, 2015 4:14 am

Bob
Thanks for the information, I have now completed installation of sheers and fairing complete, so getting ready to install side and bottom skins. Any advice best practices to proceed, cut oversize then trim, make pattern, butt vs. scarf joint, etc.
I have attached current pictures as requested.
Thank You
Attachments
12.JPG
15.JPG

crankie
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Fri May 15, 2015 4:16 am

2 more pics.
Chris
Attachments
13.jpg
8.jpg

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rbrandenstein
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby rbrandenstein » Fri May 15, 2015 11:19 am

Looking good. My your workplace is clean. Where is all the saw dust?
I scarfed my side plywood, but others have butted them. It is easier to butt them because you can do it in place and therefore you don't have to fit and hang a piece the entire length of the boat.
Because of the scarfing, I made a template out our tar paper (cheap and stiff enough to form on the frame) and cut to within a couple inches. This reduced the amount of wood I had to maneuver into position.
If you don't have one, I would recommend the multifunction tool from Harbor Freight to fit the pieces. You can fit and cut in place as you walk the panel to the stem.
Also, make sure you cut a horizontal kerf in your battens to get them to bend down.

IMG_0558.JPG
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Completed Malahini (launched 6/24/2012)
http://bobsboatbuild.blogspot.com/

JRBrown7
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Location: Spain

Re: Malahini in Spain

Postby JRBrown7 » Fri May 22, 2015 5:24 pm

Hello Bob

My name is John Brown. English, retired, living in Spain 15 years. I am building a Malahini as a hobby. I am very new to forums and computers in general but would most appreciate some advice.

I am able to do good quality joinery but have little or no experience with achieving excellent appearance and finish which I have seen in the photos of your boat and others like George Redden's. I would be very grateful if you could guide me on a few relatively simple (to a boat person) points.

How did you make, the trims across dash and around such tight curves at side against carlings, and around the opening hatches and motor well. Are they cut from plank or bent? What shape in section? How did you hide fixings?

How did you make seats, are they on flat ply sheet and then fixed in? How do they clip in, to make them removable? ( No fixings visible)
Are trims on outside skegs aluminium or stainless steel. What is section that looks convex. What size are they? What type and material did you use for back hatch, middle storage and back seat hinging.
Your top decks planking and stripes look great. Are stripes 6mm. square wood, or some type of corking.
Looks a lot of very accurate work to get quality finish.
What are protectors on side decks called that protect finish on getting in and out of boat.
Any information would be gratefully received as I have no experience on what to you must seem quite simple things.

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rbrandenstein
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby rbrandenstein » Sat May 23, 2015 4:56 pm

John,
The curved corners were made cutting from a block of mahogany with a bandsaw and then sanding and fitting to shape. The straight moulding is just a strip of mahogany with a rounded edge. There is a step in back the fits to the decking. It is epoxied. The cut curves were shaped to match the profile and then epoxied into place.

The seats are just 3/8" plywood, covered with 2" foam and upholstered. The bottom sections have blocks of wood to hold them in place. The backs are not attached. They just sit in place and lean back into the seat frames. I struggled with how to attach and mount, etc. but ended up doing nothing. They have not been an issue.

The trim along the shear is plastic car moulding. 1" wide and attached with adhesive. The other trim is stainless steel.

The deck is made with 3/8" mahogany and maple for the stripes. The mahogany is 2.25" and maple is 1/4" . I glued the maple to the edge of the mahogany first, to make dark with light pieces that I then fitted to the decking with epoxy and screws.

My blog covers most of this detail
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Bob
Completed Malahini (launched 6/24/2012)
http://bobsboatbuild.blogspot.com/

crankie
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Re: Malahini in West Virginia

Postby crankie » Thu May 28, 2015 9:49 am

Bob
Ended up scarfing the side panels and worked out fine, just made some lines at 3 inches and used the belt sander and clean up with air inline sander, easier then I thought it will be to make the scarfs. One side is initially applied to side and fits well. Question when I remove for final gluging to chine and sheers did you encapsulate the inside surface 1st? Is there a issue of expoxing encapsulated sheet to raw wood chines and sheers?
Also no matter how hard I try to be neat with expoxy on vertical surfaces I end up with runs and drips. Any tips on cleaning up or advoiding.
Thanks


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