Overniter in SC: Flipped 5-27-17

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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specialk
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby specialk » Thu Mar 17, 2016 5:36 am

I was looking for a local suppler for my 2nd build and found ...!

Hood Distribution
1925 Perimeter Road
Greenville SC 29605
manager Jim Meyer 864-277-8865

If you need a contractor name tell them General Services and use your house address as the job...

Berlin G Myers
350 North Main Street
Summerville SC
843 873 2010
they carry Okoume marine plywood and Marine Grade Fir in 4x12
Kelly...1st Boat...Flats Flyer
2nd Boat.....?

Adrock1
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Adrock1 » Wed Mar 23, 2016 5:15 pm

Alright guys, transom is coming along nicely but I have a question. Can I use straight silvertip, unthickened, for laminating layers of plywood together? I ask because I think a thinner glue might work well for laminating big flat surfaces. I've been using the gel magic to glue together all my frame parts and its worked well. The stuff is pretty thick though. When I glued the transom framing to the plywood it took quite a bit of screw pressure to squeeze the frame down tight to the panel and squeeze out all the excess glue. I had to add a few clamps to close up the joint. So I know its going to take a lot of force on a large surface like the clamping board to close up the joint and get all the excess squeeze out, well, squeezed out.

It occurred to me that the regular silvertip epoxy I have might work a lot better since it's thinner. I just always hear about people adding fillers to use it as a glue. Will it be too thin without any kind of filler? I've got some wood flour I could thicken it slightly with.

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hoodman
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby hoodman » Wed Mar 23, 2016 5:36 pm

I always use wood flour. You can mix it as thick or thin as you like.

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Bill Edmundson » Thu Mar 24, 2016 5:55 am

I like regular epoxy with micro-fibers for laminating. I mix to about applesauce consistency.

Bill
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Adrock1
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Adrock1 » Thu Mar 24, 2016 10:56 am

So I reached out to System Three tech support with this question as well. They just got back to me. Thought I would share.

I asked if I could use un thickened silver tip to laminate the layers of plywood that will make up my transom. The response was that it's not recommended. The silvertip epoxy is for fiberglass layups and encapsulating. The tech support guy said it would likely work but it's not the best product for the job.

Since it's a transom, one of the most important structural members of the boat, I guess I'll stick with the gel magic. I think I'm gonna get a notched trowel and try to regulate the amount of glue is use a little better and avoid having so much excess to squeeze out of the joint.

Adrock1
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Adrock1 » Mon Apr 18, 2016 5:43 pm

Time for an update and another question. After too many distraction and some spring chores I've still managed some progress. Alm the frames are built and encapsulated. The transom is all laminated, framed up, and encapsulated. Transom knee is all done. Basically all I have to do is give everything a good sanding and it will be ready to go on the building frame.

That's where the question comes in. The plans suggest anchoring the building frame to the floor but the ability to move it would be really nice in a cramped garage. Any tips for how to make the building form moveable but still maintain the geometric integrity? I know some here have done it. I don't necessarily need it on wheels but the ability to push it around a little in a pinch would be really nice.

Thoughts?

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hoodman
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby hoodman » Mon Apr 18, 2016 6:11 pm

You are going to be pushing, pulling, leaning and crawling on top of the thing as you build it. You may not want it to move. Mine is mounted to the floor with sleeve anchors and I triangulated everything. Also you'll want the building form to be level fore and aft and side to side. Moving it around could change your level unless your floor is absolutely perfect.

gdcarpenter
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby gdcarpenter » Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:07 pm

I had a platform for my jig when building my Zip. It was the floor system from an earlier project that had reached the end of it's life expectancy and i 'Decommishioned' it. I added the casters. Just happened to find this photo of it, I was locating the eye bolt position so had the trailer on top of the hull.
Attachments
DSC02263 (800x600).jpg
This is my first, last and only boat build.

http://www.gdzipbuild.blogspot.com

Adrock1
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Adrock1 » Wed Apr 27, 2016 2:54 pm

Thanks for the feedback guys. Looks like the easiest thing is to just anchor this thing to the floor. Being mobile would have been nice but I'll make do. Making the base ridgid enough to maintain a nice level base and still roll around was looking g to be a lot more work and money than the simple form in the plans.

So off I go. Yet another question though. I needed up my transom knee and made the clamping board three layers thick. As a result I'm going to need carriage bolts that are longer than the six inches available in the glen-l store. I can get hot dipped galvanized at the big box store in the size I need though. I plan for those bolts to be bedded in and totally encapsulated in epoxy. Is there any disadvantage in this application compared to silicon bronze? All my other screws and fasteners are silicon bronze. It would just be these bolts.

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hoodman
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby hoodman » Thu Apr 28, 2016 6:41 am

How far would you have to countersink the nuts to make the 6 inch bolts work?

Adrock1
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Adrock1 » Thu Apr 28, 2016 6:49 am

hoodman wrote:How far would you have to countersink the nuts to make the 6 inch bolts work?


Actually, that's a good point. I intended to countersink the bolt heads in the transom obviously. I suppose I could countersink the nuts in the transom knee as well. I made the knee to a 4" profile instead of 3" as the plans call for. I also made it four layers thick instead of two. So it wouldn't hurt to countersink it and inch. That might work.

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hoodman
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby hoodman » Thu Apr 28, 2016 11:15 am

That's what I did. then the nuts are embedded in epoxy and can never come loose.

Adrock1
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Adrock1 » Thu Apr 28, 2016 1:12 pm

Am I safe just going with galvanized in that case? If so I can just run to the store and get some. Otherwise im kind of on hold till I can get shipment. If they are totally bedded in epoxy and encapsulated is there any advantage to silicon bronze? This will be an almost exclusively fresh water boat.

Adrock1
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Adrock1 » Fri May 20, 2016 4:40 am

Image

Hey all. Well as you can see I've been making some progress. Frames are done and mounted on the form, chines and keel are in place and mostly faired. Started on the sheers now.

That's what leads me to my next question. The Overniter has kind of a double sheer. The main sheer clamp runs from the transom all the way to the stem. The "raised sheer" which lies just a few inches above the main sheer runs from frame three to the stem. So from frame three forward there are essentially two sheer clamps.

The plans indicate that the main sheer should be glued and screwed to all frames but not connected to the stem until after planking. I can only assume this to ensure it follows the contour of the planking. For the life of me I can't figure out how I will properly fair that portion of the sheer with it flopping around loosley. Especially since the sheers for this boat are made from two laminated layers since the full thickness won't make the bend. If I try to attach it to the stem it will be a real chore to match the curve of the planking and fair everything in together. I would need to add a second breasthook of sorts to spring the sheer out in much the same fashion as the raised sheer in order to get close to the right shape to the bend.

What's really got me stumped though is why I even need to carry the sheer all the way to the stem. The raised sheer goes from frame three forward. If I let the main sheer go from the transom and extend a foot or so past frame five and simply taper off like I will with the bottom battens this would all be very simple. And the two sheers would overlap by at least three frames ( #3,#4, and #5).

I really don't know how to proceed. Thoughts?

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Gayle Brantuk
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Re: Overniter in SC

Postby Gayle Brantuk » Fri May 20, 2016 8:45 am

Adrock1--both sheers attach to the stem per the instructions. Where are you seeing that they don't?
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