Monroe Malahini

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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Thompson
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Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2016 11:34 am
Location: Monroe, Ga

Monroe Malahini

Postby Thompson » Fri Sep 23, 2016 11:28 am

Just ordered my plans. They haven't come in yet. I've been in commercial construction for over 40 years, I've built just about everything, I'm also a woodworker. I think trying to build a boat is about the most intimidating thing I've every tried. It might be a little bit before I get started. Got a few homeowner maintenance things to get behind me. I'm glad there is the forum. I'm sure I'll have lots of questions. I'll try not to be a pest.

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rbrandenstein
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Location: O'Fallon, MO

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby rbrandenstein » Fri Sep 23, 2016 8:29 pm

Welcome to the Malahini builders club. You will find lots of information and help on this forum. It is not that hard, just take your time, read and understand each step before you begin. Make sure you get the building with plywood book as well.
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Bob
Completed Malahini (launched 6/24/2012)
http://bobsboatbuild.blogspot.com/

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Iggy
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Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2009 2:00 pm
Location: Leduc (Edmonton), Alberta

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby Iggy » Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:23 am

Malahini's a fantastic boat.. the process of building (and now owning/operating) one is both a cherished memory and and a yearly pleasure. I also work in construction but was NO woodworker before starting my build. You'll do fantastic I am sure.. this forum is a godsend when it comes to questions and references. Part of the fun is the mental process your brain goes through agonising over the next step and overall desired results. Build a good strong stand.. get your materials... make your first cut.. sand like there is no tomorrow.. glue like nobody is watching.. and remember to invest in a good pair of tweezers... you'r going to need it ;)
Ian (aka Iggy)
My Malahini Build

Thompson
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2016 11:34 am
Location: Monroe, Ga

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby Thompson » Mon Oct 10, 2016 7:33 pm

Thanks Bob and Ian for the welcoming words.
I have a question, the plans call for ring nails to be used on the frames. I was thinking screws would be better, or easier to install. Or since there are epoxied does it make a difference. The first of many questions I'm sure. Thanks

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DrBryanJ
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Location: New Jersey

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby DrBryanJ » Tue Oct 11, 2016 4:41 am

I used screws on my frames. Not using nails at all I can't say, but I think it was easier. If you don't have one, I would invest in an impact drill. When I started, I only had a normal cordless drill and striped out many screw heads. With the impact drill I still strip out some, but many, many less.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

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hoodman
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Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby hoodman » Tue Oct 11, 2016 5:50 am

Ring shank nails are quite easy to install. You will still need to pre-drill the holes. I used them to attach the gussets to my frames. As a bonus, the heads look quite nice under epoxy. They are less expensive than screws as well.

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby Bill Edmundson » Tue Oct 11, 2016 5:58 am

I use the ring shank nails on the gussets, also. But, I shoot a few brads first so nothing moves while I drive the nails. Yes, always predrill, especially if you are using white oak.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

bob smith
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Location: Chester, SC

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby bob smith » Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:10 am

For overkill, dip them in epoxy before driving them
Bob Smith
Chester, SC

bob smith
Posts: 487
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2008 6:59 am
Location: Chester, SC

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby bob smith » Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:12 am

Whenever I use ring shank nails, I dip them in epoxy before driving.
Bob Smith
Chester, SC

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hoodman
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Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby hoodman » Tue Oct 11, 2016 4:11 pm

One time I had to pull a gusset back off right after I had nailed it down. It was misaligned. The nails are so tenacious that it completely destroyed the gusset to get it off.

obd
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Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:39 pm
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby obd » Tue Oct 11, 2016 8:35 pm

I used 2 screws per gusset and the rest nails. This allowed me to dry fit the gusset and predrill for the nails. I used steel screws for the dry fit. When it came time to glue, I could align the screws and be confident my predrilled nail holes were therefore aligned. Just remember not to place screws or nails where you will later be cutting out notches and remember not to overtighten/clamp when gluing with epoxy. Impact driver is spectacular at driving the bronze screws with minimal stripping.
Bob

Thompson
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2016 11:34 am
Location: Monroe, Ga

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby Thompson » Wed Oct 12, 2016 4:04 am

Thanks for all the good advice. This forum is why I chose Glen L. I like the idea of shooting a couple brad nails to hold things together till you get the other fasteners in. I've only ordered screws. Think I'll get some nails also. I know ring shank nails will hold. Almost impossible to remove. Thanks again
Lyman

Thompson
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2016 11:34 am
Location: Monroe, Ga

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby Thompson » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:42 pm

All framing is going to be white oak. 15 to 20 years ago my Dad, who is a woodworker, saw a add in the newspaper where someone had rough sawn white oak 5/4 and thicker for sale 400 bd.ft. for $400.00. That's a 1.00 a bd. ft. My Dad is 88 years old and doesn't do much woodworking anymore. Still had more than enough of the lumber left and gave it to me. I've planed it down and it's beautiful. None of it is quarter sawn or longer than 8 ft long.

My questions are:
The sheer and chine call for pieces to be 18 ft long. I understand that these pieces can have scarf joints, but to use what i have they would have to have two scarf joints in each piece. I plan to do both sheer and chine in two laminations. Will two scarf joints be ok??? Also will not being quarter sawn be a problem. The keel would have to have a scarf joint as well. Do I need to just buy longer boards.
Thanks

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hoodman
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Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby hoodman » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:56 pm

There's nothing wrong with scarf joints. You'll want them to land in flatter sections. Most of the longitudinals in my boat are scarfed including the keel. I'm not sure of the answer of quarter sawn vs flat. Quarter sawn is supposed to be more stable but I don't know if there is a strength difference. In either case you'll want to watch for funny spots in the grain in pieces that are going to have severe bends like the sheers.

Hercdrvr
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Location: McKinney TX

Re: Monroe Mahalini

Postby Hercdrvr » Sun Oct 16, 2016 8:45 pm

8ft lengths will get you back far enough from the curve of the bow to use scarf or butt block joints.
Matt
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IMG_1696.PNG
Multiple Laminations and joints in chine


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