Seeking Information & Assistance

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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Mr_Big_J
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Location: Western Montana, USA

Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:37 pm

Good Evening All,

My name is Jason, from Western Montana. I am looking at building a boat, and need some opinions/information/assistance in selecting the appropriate plan. Obviously, only I can pick the plan I like, but I do have some set criteria I need to meet, so I'd welcome some opinions on which boat to build out of the several I like.

First off, my experience. I work in I.T. and Communications. I have limited wood working knowledge, but have regularly tackled several home improvement type projects. I know how to properly use basic tools, and basic wood working tools such as a table saw, skill saw, etc. I also have some experience building some fiberglass and carbon fiber objects, so I plan on building the boat with wood and/or fiberglass. I don't know a ton about boats, but I owned a 70's or 80's Glastron back in the late 90's that had an inline 6 motor connected to a sterndrive. It was in pretty bad shape, and my brother and I fixed it up a little and used it for a few seasons.

So, I'll start off by saying that I'm open to any design that fits my criteria, I literally have 20 or 30 Google Chrome tabs open, each one a Glen-L boat that I like. The following is a list of criteria the boat must meet:

1) Easily and comfortably hold 6 people. I have a family of six, and it's not a family boat unless we can all use it together. At the moment, we weigh 1,000 pounds all together. After the weight of the boat, motor, fluids, equipment, etc., the boat should be able to comfortably carry 1200 to 1300 pounds (in case one of the kids friends comes along).

2) I am only interested in inboard motor installations, probably Cheverolet V-8, and I don't believe that I'm interested in anything that has the motor directly driving the prop, is that called a bobtail? Perhaps someone could educate me a little more if there's a good reason to consider a bobtail installation, but I was looking more at a sterndrive, jet, v-drive, or something similar. I know usually some gearing is required, and I'd also like to have reverse, which isn't possible with a bobtail, right?

3) Must be a planning hull design. We plan on tubing and fishing. None of us water ski, but enjoy going tubing. I'm not sure about the speed required to do this, but this is one of the main activities we are building the boat for, so it must perform in this aspect. We will do some recreational fishing, but not enough that I want a boat dedicated to that. No live wells are required, although I'd add stuff like that if there was enough room.

4) I'm not considering any boats like the Monte Carlo or Tahoe, trying not to go too complex in the build aspect. I've read some build threads for some of those style of boats and they're beautiful, but I'm hoping to build something not as builder intensive as they are with the planking of the hull. I'd also like a little more open deck space than most "runabouts" provide.

5) The boat will be used in Montana lakes and rivers. I don't need anything with a particularly shallow draft. I don't have any idea what a "normal" draft is, but a "flats" style of boat is not required. No offshore boating will likely be done for years (after the kids move out) if at all.

6) We value open space, so obviously a larger design or something with more open space is valued as opposed to a 16 foot ski boat.

7) It has to be legally trailerable on a regular basis. Meaning, I'm going to store it at home and tow it to the lake or river when we use it.

8) I don't mind altering or redesigning from the deck up, as long as I get the correct hull design and space, and the redesign or alteration doesn't affect the boats structural integrity.

I plan on doing ALL of the work myself. I already have a Chevy 350 V-8, so I'd really like to use that. I have a brother in law who is a mechanic, so I will get assistance from him in rebuilding it specifically for boating, and "marinizing" the engine. I really wish I was building a boat for two, because I really love Roberta's Torpedo build. What an incredibly gorgeous boat that is! Maybe that will be my second boat :)

The boats I've researched that I like: Quest 23 (built as a deck boat instead of a houseboat), Olympian 23, Mai Tai, Lazy Daze, Monsoon, Vera Cruise, Albert E, Renegade, Wanderlust, Carioca, Bolero. I don't think I want to go much larger than 23' or 24'. I know this is a lot, and that many won't even make it through reading my post. I'm sure you see your fair share of people joining, getting information, and then not building or not posting. I do, however, have the permission of "the boss" (a.k.a the Captain, or the wife) to undertake this project, and a two car garage to build in, so I'm hopeful that I can make this happen. Thank you to anyone that has managed to read through this mish mash of thoughts, and even more thanks to the people who take the time to respond. I really appreciate the input of people that have gone before me, and/or know more than I do. I'd really like to get this right on the first try (at least as far as picking the right boat/plan).

Thanks Again,

Jason

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BayouBengal
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby BayouBengal » Thu Aug 03, 2017 6:58 am

First, and of utmost importance, you need to give your wife the proper respect. She is the Admiral, and you sir, are the lowly Captain.

I like all of the Glen-L models you've mentioned in your post. I think the most important thing is that if you want sterndrive power, you need to be sure and select a hull designed for either sterndrive or outboard power and it appears that you've done that.

From your writeup, I've no doubt that you have plenty enough skills to build a boat.

I'm not an engine guy, and I understand you'll have professional help from your brother-in-law; but from someone who's installed a sterndrive, I'd suggest that you look to trade out your Chevy 350 for a mercruiser or volvo penta setup, or just buy a mercruiser setup and save your Chevy 350 for another purpose. If money is tight, you can buy a used sterndrive assembly off of a junk boat very cheaply. I just think you're going to have to do a lot of backwards engineering on the Chevy 350 to get it to mate up correctly with the outdrive and transom assembly; whereas, if you get an engine designed for a sterndrive application, it all snaps together pretty easily. Just my opinion, but once again, I'm not an engine guy.

Good luck and look forward to following your build.

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DrBryanJ
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby DrBryanJ » Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:01 am

Jason, are you looking for a cabin? Most of the plans you listed do have cabins. When I was reading you list of requirements, I thought something like the Key West would meet your needs. Maybe the Snake Shooter stretched to 23' might work.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

Mr_Big_J
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Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:36 pm
Location: Western Montana, USA

Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:23 am

BayouBengal wrote:First, and of utmost importance, you need to give your wife the proper respect. She is the Admiral, and you sir, are the lowly Captain.

I like all of the Glen-L models you've mentioned in your post. I think the most important thing is that if you want sterndrive power, you need to be sure and select a hull designed for either sterndrive or outboard power and it appears that you've done that.

From your writeup, I've no doubt that you have plenty enough skills to build a boat.

I'm not an engine guy, and I understand you'll have professional help from your brother-in-law; but from someone who's installed a sterndrive, I'd suggest that you look to trade out your Chevy 350 for a mercruiser or volvo penta setup, or just buy a mercruiser setup and save your Chevy 350 for another purpose. If money is tight, you can buy a used sterndrive assembly off of a junk boat very cheaply. I just think you're going to have to do a lot of backwards engineering on the Chevy 350 to get it to mate up correctly with the outdrive and transom assembly; whereas, if you get an engine designed for a sterndrive application, it all snaps together pretty easily. Just my opinion, but once again, I'm not an engine guy.

Good luck and look forward to following your build.


Sir, you are absolutely correct, she is the Admiral. Thankfully she hasn't read the post and seen my insubordination!

Excellent advice. Used boats are harder to come by up here in Montana. Even more so a used boat with a sterndrive setup. However, your advice is sound. I'll keep my eyes open in the area, as well as Spokane, WA area. If something pops up, I'll try to get it. If I haven't found anything by the time I need to start mounting the engine, I'll move forward with what I have. I'll probably keep an eye on eBay as well.

Thank You,

Jason

Mr_Big_J
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:30 am

DrBryanJ wrote:Jason, are you looking for a cabin? Most of the plans you listed do have cabins. When I was reading you list of requirements, I thought something like the Key West would meet your needs. Maybe the Snake Shooter stretched to 23' might work.


Dr. Bryan J,

No, no cabin is required. But the extra room and seating is always appreciated. That is the only reason I was looking at those other boats. I wouldn't use a cabin for sleeping, but having seating area where people can get away from the sun is a plus. I do not plan on building out a galley or anything like that. It would all be seating and storage.

I do have to say, as well, that the Admiral was a little hesitant to the idea of a boat when we first started talking about it. She wasn't sure we'd use one. But over the last few months she has come around and agrees that it would be great to have one. Once she got interested, she started looking at the website with me. She really like the lines of the Monsoon, Vera Cruise, Albert E style boats. The lines reminded her of some of the old cars her dad used to have. She's not really attracted to newer styles of boats, so I was just moving in the path of least resistance as far as the Admiral is concerned. But I will definitely show her the designs you mentioned and see what her reaction is.

Thank You,

Jason

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DrBryanJ
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby DrBryanJ » Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:57 am

Jason: I too like the lines of the older cabins. I can see where "the admiral" is coming from. I think the cabins may limit your seating options. Not having built a boat with a cabin, I'm not 100% sure. I know Carl building a Vera Cruise has put a lot of thought into it. Maybe he will chime in. If you are looking for shade, a bimini top would work well the the two plans I mentioned.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

Zapped
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Zapped » Thu Aug 03, 2017 3:09 pm

Make sure whatever you decide to build can get out of the garage. That's probably more important than the build itself, otherwise, you're stuck with one heck of a conversation piece in the garage! There was a woman that decided to build an ultralight in her garage near me, it's never been off the ground b/c she can't get it out of the garage. oops!

The Monsoon may be a bit too tall, that's 7'9", Vera Cruise is 7'3". The Albert E could possibly modified a bit b/c it's only 6' 8" but maybe someone that's more knowledgeable than I am will say if it would work or not.

If you plan on finishing up outside of the garage, then ignore me. :)
Planning to build the Malahini

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galamb
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby galamb » Thu Aug 03, 2017 3:11 pm

24 feet is a lot of boat to build - I did one myself.

9 years back we (myself and the wife) started building the Cuddy Sport (my first complete build save a couple stripper canoes - certainly my first "major" build) which, by spec, is a 24' walk-around cuddy. We stretched it to 25'8" which was allowed by the plans and we all know you always wish you had an extra foot of boat no matter how big it is. Also, somewhere around 26' is where it goes into a different class of vessel for what gear is required to carry on board, so we kept it below that threshold.

I lost all my finished pics of the build when a power bump took out the computer they were stored on but do have a good few of the build pics which were uploaded elsewhere. I just sold the boat a few weeks back - time to build a new one and this one was too big for how our lifestyle has changed.

The build took three years before she was launched (started in late summer of 2009 and went into the water in spring 2012) - life, the weather and sometimes just your mood gets in the way of any project.

Anyhow, enough of my rambling. The boat was almost 8'6" wide so was trailerable in all of the US and Canada without need of any special permits (wide load/oversize etc). It did require a tandem axle trailer, with brakes (hydraulic disks on each axle) since the rigged weight was almost 1900 lbs - gassed/sitting on the trailer I was towing about 2450 lbs (according to the CAT scales at the local truck stop).

With the cabin there was still ample seating for six people. Without the cabin (and it could have been built that way without issue) it could have easily accommodated a dozen comfortably.

I powered the boat with a 140 horse outboard which topped it out in the very low 30 mph range (33 on a good day with flat water). The best efficiency according to my fuel flow meter was at about 23 mph where she burned 7.3 gallons per hour (so it was fed from twin 40 gallon belly tanks - up in Canada where 80 gallons of gas costs $351 if I filled up today which would give me barely 12 hours of "cruise time" was a factor is passing the boat along to another owner with deeper pockets then mine) :)

We also have a 14' aluminum which gets used a lot for fishing, so the "gigantic boat" sat unless we were going out for a weekend or week long trip running the canal systems in our area (a move from being on big water (Lake Erie) to an area infested with small inland lakes suddenly left us with way too much boat for our needs). The point I'm getting at here is "be honest about the operating costs" a lot of boats sit in back yards because they cost money to run (or to tow to where you will use them) that wasn't factored in. If your kids are really young you will need the extra room for "years". If they are approaching their teens you could well find yourself and your wife (maybe) as the only two "on board" when they are "too cool to hang with the parents" :)

The build, less the motor, came in at $11,200. That involved a lot of planning, looking and buying from discount bins at dozens of marine supply places, flea-bay and the like. But because you are building yourself you have a great deal of latitude in what you can use - it's "all" custom.

The wood, plywood, silicon bronze fasteners, epoxy (and accessories - brushes, mixing bowls etc) and fiberglass cloth made up just on $4000 of that cost. The rest was eaten up with seats, trim tabs, gauges, gas tanks, deck hardware, hatch covers, paint (think we dropped over a grand on paint/varnish) etc etc.

So do cost out your build - be honest and price it with all the "bells and whistles" - you can shave some costs but you don't want to build something you won't be happy with and you don't want to have 4K in lumber put together and suddenly realize you need twice that to actually finish the build and your budget didn't consider that- especially if you are looking at a 20 foot plus build, you will have a lot of time and money invested in it.

I got the motor for "cheap" and rebuilt it and built the trailer from Glen-L trailer plans. All in I was on the water for a little under 15K (compare that to the 50K for a Whaler of similar specs and I thought we did all right) :)

While I do have a full up wood shop (table, band, mitre saws (compound and sliding compound), planer, jointer, drill press, scroll saw and just about every power tool known to man that can be plugged in) I will be honest when I say the whole build could have been done with a jig saw and a skill saw had I of bought dressed lumber (although a power plane saves countless hours when fairing a large hull)- not saying it would be "ideal" but you could get away with that and a couple of other hand tools. And if I told you I have about 100 clamps, I'm really not lying - I have three dozen 3" C-Clamps alone.

It isn't any tougher to build a 24 footer than a 12 footer - everything is just wider, longer, thicker etc. My current project is a 16 footer and I keep checking the plans for the "rest of the boat" - it seems tiny in comparison :)

I'm rambling, but if you have specific questions about a build on the scale you are considering, I will pass along what my experience was.

Last note: I would never undertake a build this size again unless it could be accomplished completely indoors - as in a big garage or shop. Mine was done outside in a (not quite) semi-permanent shelter (barely more then an hard sided tent and I was at the mercy of the elements - too hot, too cold, too wet, too windy etc - that added two years to what could have been a one year build.
Graham

Yes, Plywood is "real" wood :)

A "professional" is someone who gets paid for their work - it doesn't necessarily mean they are good at it :)

Mr_Big_J
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Thu Aug 03, 2017 4:33 pm

Zapped wrote:Make sure whatever you decide to build can get out of the garage. That's probably more important than the build itself, otherwise, you're stuck with one heck of a conversation piece in the garage! There was a woman that decided to build an ultralight in her garage near me, it's never been off the ground b/c she can't get it out of the garage. oops!

The Monsoon may be a bit too tall, that's 7'9", Vera Cruise is 7'3". The Albert E could possibly modified a bit b/c it's only 6' 8" but maybe someone that's more knowledgeable than I am will say if it would work or not.

If you plan on finishing up outside of the garage, then ignore me. :)


Zapped,

Great point! I haven't measured my garage yet, if I'm honest. I know, that's terribly short sighted of me. However, my initial plan is to build the hull only in the garage, then move it outside to a semi permanent structure for the rest. It's not the perfect situation, but it is the situation I am stuck with. We're not looking at moving anytime soon. I'm not really wanting a small boat, a.k.a 15/16 foot for the reasons I stated above, so I'll have to make due.

Thanks for bringing up a great point though. As soon as I read your post, I almost slapped myself. Please excuse me while I go measure my garage :D

Jason

Mr_Big_J
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Thu Aug 03, 2017 4:53 pm

galamb wrote:24 feet is a lot of boat to build - I did one myself.

9 years back we (myself and the wife) started building the Cuddy Sport (my first complete build save a couple stripper canoes - certainly my first "major" build) which, by spec, is a 24' walk-around cuddy. We stretched it to 25'8" which was allowed by the plans and we all know you always wish you had an extra foot of boat no matter how big it is. Also, somewhere around 26' is where it goes into a different class of vessel for what gear is required to carry on board, so we kept it below that threshold.

I lost all my finished pics of the build when a power bump took out the computer they were stored on but do have a good few of the build pics which were uploaded elsewhere. I just sold the boat a few weeks back - time to build a new one and this one was too big for how our lifestyle has changed.

The build took three years before she was launched (started in late summer of 2009 and went into the water in spring 2012) - life, the weather and sometimes just your mood gets in the way of any project.

Anyhow, enough of my rambling. The boat was almost 8'6" wide so was trailerable in all of the US and Canada without need of any special permits (wide load/oversize etc). It did require a tandem axle trailer, with brakes (hydraulic disks on each axle) since the rigged weight was almost 1900 lbs - gassed/sitting on the trailer I was towing about 2450 lbs (according to the CAT scales at the local truck stop).

With the cabin there was still ample seating for six people. Without the cabin (and it could have been built that way without issue) it could have easily accommodated a dozen comfortably.

I powered the boat with a 140 horse outboard which topped it out in the very low 30 mph range (33 on a good day with flat water). The best efficiency according to my fuel flow meter was at about 23 mph where she burned 7.3 gallons per hour (so it was fed from twin 40 gallon belly tanks - up in Canada where 80 gallons of gas costs $351 if I filled up today which would give me barely 12 hours of "cruise time" was a factor is passing the boat along to another owner with deeper pockets then mine) :)

We also have a 14' aluminum which gets used a lot for fishing, so the "gigantic boat" sat unless we were going out for a weekend or week long trip running the canal systems in our area (a move from being on big water (Lake Erie) to an area infested with small inland lakes suddenly left us with way too much boat for our needs). The point I'm getting at here is "be honest about the operating costs" a lot of boats sit in back yards because they cost money to run (or to tow to where you will use them) that wasn't factored in. If your kids are really young you will need the extra room for "years". If they are approaching their teens you could well find yourself and your wife (maybe) as the only two "on board" when they are "too cool to hang with the parents" :)

The build, less the motor, came in at $11,200. That involved a lot of planning, looking and buying from discount bins at dozens of marine supply places, flea-bay and the like. But because you are building yourself you have a great deal of latitude in what you can use - it's "all" custom.

The wood, plywood, silicon bronze fasteners, epoxy (and accessories - brushes, mixing bowls etc) and fiberglass cloth made up just on $4000 of that cost. The rest was eaten up with seats, trim tabs, gauges, gas tanks, deck hardware, hatch covers, paint (think we dropped over a grand on paint/varnish) etc etc.

So do cost out your build - be honest and price it with all the "bells and whistles" - you can shave some costs but you don't want to build something you won't be happy with and you don't want to have 4K in lumber put together and suddenly realize you need twice that to actually finish the build and your budget didn't consider that- especially if you are looking at a 20 foot plus build, you will have a lot of time and money invested in it.

I got the motor for "cheap" and rebuilt it and built the trailer from Glen-L trailer plans. All in I was on the water for a little under 15K (compare that to the 50K for a Whaler of similar specs and I thought we did all right) :)

While I do have a full up wood shop (table, band, mitre saws (compound and sliding compound), planer, jointer, drill press, scroll saw and just about every power tool known to man that can be plugged in) I will be honest when I say the whole build could have been done with a jig saw and a skill saw had I of bought dressed lumber (although a power plane saves countless hours when fairing a large hull)- not saying it would be "ideal" but you could get away with that and a couple of other hand tools. And if I told you I have about 100 clamps, I'm really not lying - I have three dozen 3" C-Clamps alone.

It isn't any tougher to build a 24 footer than a 12 footer - everything is just wider, longer, thicker etc. My current project is a 16 footer and I keep checking the plans for the "rest of the boat" - it seems tiny in comparison :)

I'm rambling, but if you have specific questions about a build on the scale you are considering, I will pass along what my experience was.

Last note: I would never undertake a build this size again unless it could be accomplished completely indoors - as in a big garage or shop. Mine was done outside in a (not quite) semi-permanent shelter (barely more then an hard sided tent and I was at the mercy of the elements - too hot, too cold, too wet, too windy etc - that added two years to what could have been a one year build.


Graham,

There's LOTS of great information there. It's going to take me a while to think about and digest everything you've said. But, I see your main points, and it gives me lots to think about. A big boat has a big budget and big operating costs. Seems simple, but something we often don't concern ourselves with when we embark on a project like this. Somehow I need to balance my monetary budget with my need for space.

I have four kids ranging in age from 15 down to 2, so at least three of them will be here when I finish the boat. Still not sure exactly how much space I need, it's so hard to look at a picture of a plan and envision where everyone will go and how much space they'll have.

Thank you so much for sharing your experience with me.

Jason

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mrintense
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby mrintense » Thu Aug 03, 2017 5:44 pm

Jason,

First off, welcome to the forum. I'm building the Vera Cruise, and I only know of one other person who is building it. He hasn't been on the board for a few years now because he is remodeling a house.

As per the plans, the Vera Cruise would be okay for four people as long as some of them don't mind being in the cabin. Cabin height is low (5' 6"). It's a great design and looks cool, but I think it might be a bit small for your needs if you keep the cabin. I am not sure if the design will lend itself to an open design (no cabin). On mine, I elected to shorten the length of the cabin and increase the aft cockpit area. I am also building mine with the aft end of the cabin open (no bulkhead or door). All of this, and other things I am doing are geared towards making the boat feel more open.

I knew all of this going into the build. I was limited in length to a max of 21 feet which is exactly what the Vera cruise is (built to plans). I have hundreds of photos linked to my build blog (see signature) where you can see what I've been doing.You can also see how tight it is in my garage.

I build my boat typically in 30 to 60 minute sessions usually 5 or 6 days a week. I try to get in a little more time on the weekends.I am a slow builder and started off with very little in the way of power tools. I still lack a band saw. My build is coming up on 5 years and i expect it to take another 2 or 3 to functional usability. Other's have built equally complicated boats in less time so it can be done. But it will take time.

Don't let that scare you off, because building this boat has been one of the most satisfying things i have ever done. I know for a fact that I am going to have something that no one else in my area is going to have. To me, that means a lot. So I keep plugging away on it.

So consider your garage, think about how you're going to manage the build in general terms. Don't try to plan everything to the nth degree because you'll never get started.

Oh yeah, as for an inboard, the Vera Cruise as designed is made for outboards, but it specifically says that it can be build as an inboard outboard design. Biggest limitation is that you limited to 700 pounds for motor and out drive which pretty much means a 4 cylinder engine(unless it's aluminum). I am planning on a 90 to 115 HP outboard which I think will be plenty of power for my needs. Not looking for a speed boat, just a cruiser.

All that being said, I hope you choose to do a cabin cruiser design as we don't get many of those here. Good luck and keep us posted.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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kens
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby kens » Thu Aug 03, 2017 5:56 pm

Stretch a Double Eagle. build on lift strakes with the stretch.
Check out the large aft cockpit, you can do whatever you want with the cabin, or eliminate cabin altogether.
Don't let the plans fool you, D. Eagle is a planing hull, more so when you stretch it.
I deleted the cabin totally, and made mine a center console.
25' and planes with a 4-banger.
Oak is over rated, everything about it takes extra time; then it warps, splits or checks !!! :roll:

Mr_Big_J
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Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Thu Aug 03, 2017 6:18 pm

mrintense wrote:Jason,

First off, welcome to the forum. I'm building the Vera Cruise, and I only know of one other person who is building it. He hasn't been on the board for a few years now because he is remodeling a house.

As per the plans, the Vera Cruise would be okay for four people as long as some of them don't mind being in the cabin. Cabin height is low (5' 6"). It's a great design and looks cool, but I think it might be a bit small for your needs if you keep the cabin. I am not sure if the design will lend itself to an open design (no cabin). On mine, I elected to shorten the length of the cabin and increase the aft cockpit area. I am also building mine with the aft end of the cabin open (no bulkhead or door). All of this, and other things I am doing are geared towards making the boat feel more open.

I knew all of this going into the build. I was limited in length to a max of 21 feet which is exactly what the Vera cruise is (built to plans). I have hundreds of photos linked to my build blog (see signature) where you can see what I've been doing.You can also see how tight it is in my garage.

I build my boat typically in 30 to 60 minute sessions usually 5 or 6 days a week. I try to get in a little more time on the weekends.I am a slow builder and started off with very little in the way of power tools. I still lack a band saw. My build is coming up on 5 years and i expect it to take another 2 or 3 to functional usability. Other's have built equally complicated boats in less time so it can be done. But it will take time.

Don't let that scare you off, because building this boat has been one of the most satisfying things i have ever done. I know for a fact that I am going to have something that no one else in my area is going to have. To me, that means a lot. So I keep plugging away on it.

So consider your garage, think about how you're going to manage the build in general terms. Don't try to plan everything to the nth degree because you'll never get started.

Oh yeah, as for an inboard, the Vera Cruise as designed is made for outboards, but it specifically says that it can be build as an inboard outboard design. Biggest limitation is that you limited to 700 pounds for motor and out drive which pretty much means a 4 cylinder engine(unless it's aluminum). I am planning on a 90 to 115 HP outboard which I think will be plenty of power for my needs. Not looking for a speed boat, just a cruiser.

All that being said, I hope you choose to do a cabin cruiser design as we don't get many of those here. Good luck and keep us posted.


Carl,

Thanks for sharing your insight and experience. When I initially read your post, I admit that I almost immediately dismissed the Vera Cruise from my list. I'm not looking for a speed boat, but I am looking for something I can tow the kids on an tube sufficiently. Also, as I mentioned, I already have a Chevy 350 motor. That being said, as I thought some more, I thought. I know of a LIGHT weight, four cylinder engine, that has 186 horsepower bone stock. With a computer upgrade, fuel injection upgrade, and some tuning it could easily hit over 200hp. This gives me something to think about. I know that the Suzuki Hyabusa engine has been used in jet boats, but I don't know if it's been used for an inboard motor. Guess I need to do some research 8)

Thanks Again,

Jason

Mr_Big_J
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:36 pm
Location: Western Montana, USA

Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Thu Aug 03, 2017 6:22 pm

kens wrote:Stretch a Double Eagle. build on lift strakes with the stretch.
Check out the large aft cockpit, you can do whatever you want with the cabin, or eliminate cabin altogether.
Don't let the plans fool you, D. Eagle is a planing hull, more so when you stretch it.
I deleted the cabin totally, and made mine a center console.
25' and planes with a 4-banger.


Ken,

That is an INTRIGUING idea! That would fit what I'm looking for, places away from the sun and places for people who want to be in the sun. A couple questions...

1) Can I eliminate the cabin and move the helm forward? Once I did that, I would hard cover about half the open deck space.

2) If the Double Eagle is stretched, and I build up some reinforcement, can I use an engine that weighs more than their recommendation?

3) Do you think that a small v-8 (302 Ford or 305 Chevy) or a large v-6 (4.3L Chevy) would be applicable at that point?

Jason

Mr_Big_J
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:36 pm
Location: Western Montana, USA

Re: Seeking Information & Assistance

Postby Mr_Big_J » Thu Aug 03, 2017 6:29 pm

Maybe leave the helm where it is, and build an open bow with some seating?

Jason


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