PT boats

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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RobB
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PT boats

Postby RobB » Thu Apr 19, 2007 7:06 pm

When in Virginia recently I found several of these boats. They are beautiful. Looks like they should jump out of the water and fly. Want to learn all I can about this design, please help. I 'll be happy with anything you know about them. My grandfather told me that they were made out of plywood. Is that cool or what, a vessel used for that purpose in the era of steele boats doing its job with such a huge differance in materials. Think the Navy would sell me the plans. :lol: Thanks for any help you can give me on the subject.
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.

Brian Eager
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Postby Brian Eager » Fri Apr 20, 2007 4:28 am

Rob, the PT boat story is indeed fascinating.

Here's a link to some interesting information for you, I copied it from a posting that Cec put up in February to the Miscellaneous column.

http://www.pt171.org/PT171/sting/

The boats were 75 and 80 feet long, sometimes powered with 3 V-12 engines, so fuel economy was not great, but you are right, they could fly!

The late President John F. Kennedy was a PT boat skipper, I believe there is some interesting material at the National Geographic website about the locating of the wreck of his PT 109 in the Solomon Islands.

Start with a Google search for PT Boats and begin there.

Brian
Noah was a first-time boatbuilder

RobB
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Postby RobB » Fri Apr 20, 2007 10:40 am

Very cool site, thanks. Still looking it over, but it looks very informative. :D I keep thinking with a change in the deck configuration it would look like the worlds biggest runabout, and double for an incredible yacht. From what I've read so far on fuel consumption I may need to be in the oil business just to run one of these on the weekends. :lol: :lol:
Is Elco or Higgins still in business, they won the largest parts of the contracts the navy awarded. Do you know the Navy beached these boats after the war, scavaged all the useable hardware and burnt them. AWWWWWWW THE HORROR :!: :!: :!: . What were they thinking. At the very least they could have done a minor refit down to one engine and sold them to recoup a portion of thier costs. All those beautiful wooden boats destroyed. Ohh yeah I read that they really weren't made from plywood, but from mahogony, and that the seams were so tight that even when one was shredded in two the forward half of the boat would not sink. Due to the quality construction and airtight compartments.

Well tell me more good stuff. Any sites with technical drawings :?: :D
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.

Aaron B
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Postby Aaron B » Fri Apr 20, 2007 10:54 am

I found this site
http://www.ptboats.org/30-0-05-plans-01.html

Looks like you can order the plans page by page.

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narduccimarine
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Postby narduccimarine » Fri Apr 20, 2007 1:52 pm

There used to be some PT's in Belmar NJ that were converted into party fishing boats. A fellow I went to school with worked on his fathers during the summer. I wouldn't be surprised if some were still in service. They were converted to single and dual diesel power.
I just don't understand, I cut that plank twice and its still too short
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PapaDon
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Postby PapaDon » Fri Apr 20, 2007 11:47 pm

These boats are at Fall River, Mass. The two bow on shots CLEARLY show they were not plywood hulls. The story goes thusly.....at the time of their building, the Navy was not totally 'sold' on this 'new' material called plywood so would only allow it to be used 'topsides'...........and it was. You all know of course that these were incredibly fast boats, but in hindsight, had the Navy allowed plywood hulls.........with short wings---they WOULD have FLOWN!....................... A funny side note to this plywood story was that the 'ARMOUR' around the machine guns WERE made from plywood and, when painted black, the sailors thought they were protected!!! (Well, maybe thats not too funny afterall...) :shock[/img]Image[/img][img][img]http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u40/PapaDonBoat/Boston9-05184.jpg[/img][/img]
Last edited by PapaDon on Sat Apr 21, 2007 12:53 pm, edited 3 times in total.
If God had intended for us to have fibreglass boats, we would have fibreglass trees.

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kens
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Postby kens » Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:57 am

The recent Weblatter has pics of a PT. PT728 is still running and giving boat rides.

Stevengould46
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Postby Stevengould46 » Sat Apr 21, 2007 12:06 pm

If you check the back issues of WoodenBoat you'll find at least one good article on the PT boats. And I'll think that you'l find that they were indeed built of plywood.

Flipper
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PT boats

Postby Flipper » Fri Apr 27, 2007 9:01 am

Sorry. They were indeed plywood.
Flip
Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither. - Benjamin Franklin

RobB
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Museum site

Postby RobB » Fri Apr 27, 2007 11:22 am

:D Hey guys, I guess I should clarify. The hulls were indeed mahogany planked, but the deck Was Plywood. The original plans called for plywood thoughout, but the Navy wasn't having any of that. I'll try to find the Museum site where I found this info. The deck and upper configuration was diffenatly Plywood. That includes the housing around the gun turrets they were plywood painted to look like metal. :shock: really :!:
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.

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Archibald
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Postby Archibald » Fri Apr 27, 2007 11:37 am

At the end of World War II my father discovered that the government was giving PT boats away for $1.00. He really wanted one. Who wouldn’t? He could have picked it up somewhere in the Long Beach California area in good running condition. He stated to consider a trip to the San Francisco Bay. I grew up in Palo Alto California and he wanted the boat to be based near there in the south part of the bay.

And then he woke up. He calculated the cost of motoring up the coast and realized the boat for $1.00 was more costly than he could ever afford. But the good news is that when I was about 5 or 6 he and a neighbor built a boat. My best guess is that it was a boat very similar to the Vera Cruz. I’d love to know if it was a Glen-L design.

Now I admit that there could be flaws in the story as I remember it. But I do clearly remember my father talking about how he considered having a PT boat. (Patrol Torpedo)

Bob I think you have an eye for a beautiful design. I’ve always liked the PT boat. I’ve always wondered how JFK could have gotten run over by an enemy destroyer. But it was night and perhaps he was just very unlucky. His heroism after the incident is beyond question. If you want to see a good movie that features these boats see John Wayne’s , “They were dispensable”. It is based on real history.

Brian Eager
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Postby Brian Eager » Sat Apr 28, 2007 5:24 am

Fuel costs would be, shall we say, significant. I think the P-51 Mustangs may have had burn rates of about 100 gph with a V-12 engine. For a 3 engined PT boat, say about 300 gph, at current prices, operating cost of $1200 per hour fuel only, not to mention maintenance, oil, and(gasp!) insurance. It would soon run into real money.

They Were Expendable was the movie Arch was referring to, a 1945 masterpiece starring John Wayne and Robert Montgomery, directed by John Ford. Google the title and enjoy the links.

Brian
Noah was a first-time boatbuilder

RobB
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Postby RobB » Sat Apr 28, 2007 9:41 am

8) Pssst! I think thats what all the big guns are for :!: I mean why have em if you can't get a lil price break on fuel :roll: :!: :lol: :lol: :lol:
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.

Flipper
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PT boats

Postby Flipper » Sun Apr 29, 2007 6:20 am

The Liberty v-12 in the pt boats was 2500 cubic inches and burned 120 octane AV-gas that airplanes used. Living near Clayton NY I get to visit the Antique Boat Museum often, and they have a John Hacker designed boat known as the largest runabout ever built. It is powered by one supercharged Liberty V-12. Burning 120 octane fuel at 190 gallons per hour, it produces 1600 h.p. at 2800 r.p.m. The boat is 48 feet long and goes 70 mph.
I just felt the need to share some more on this because it is an example of taking PT boat power and running with it all you can.
Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither. - Benjamin Franklin

RobB
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Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:20 pm
Location: Memphis

Postby RobB » Sun Apr 29, 2007 1:11 pm

:shock: Where can I get a job so I can afford to run a boat that uses 190 gph :idea: That is just crazy :lol:
Is the musuem really nice? I was thinking about a trip up there soon, should I add it to my itenerary? ( think I spelled that wrong, :roll: oh well maybe no one will notice).
Ok serious question, when the Navy dropped this boat, did they replace it with another design for a similar purpose. If so what was or is it?
If you don't start heading that way today, tommorrow you won't be any closer to your destination.


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