Fishing for a design?

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Fishing for a design?

Postby larryd76 » Fri Apr 20, 2007 1:59 pm

Hey, My name is Larry, this is my first post. I am trying to find a design for a boat suitable for Fishing at the jersey shore. Both the ocean and the bay can be very choppy at times, and I want to feel safe in my boat. I want something trailerable like the V-dory or Chunky Dory? Do you know of any obvious designs that I may be overlooking??

Some inside room for bad weather is a plus but, not necesary.

I have already spent countless hours on this website and associated blogs, All of the boats are amazing. I have been bitten by the bug to build.

I love woodworking and am confident in my skills, but am leaning towards an outboard engine because I think inboard may require more machining and mechanical skill than I have. I am looking for suggestions, in no hurry at all. My current project is trying to find a NICE house and by NICE I mean a very spacious garage with a nearby structure for sleeping and showering. I am dead set on building the boat as soon as I have the room. I now live in a 2 bedroom apartment.

IF anyone is in the south jersey area and building a boat I would love to check out your build.

Keep up the good work everyone!!!
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!

basilkies
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:19 pm
Location: Marin California

Postby basilkies » Fri Apr 20, 2007 2:20 pm

I built he VEE DORY by Glen L and have been running it for several years now in San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean from Bodega. The boat is very sea worthy and handles much rougher stuff than my buddies Boston Whaler Montauk.

I built my dory with the traditional internal transom but would I don't think I get any advantage from this. Well maybe two, I can untangle fishing line from my prop easy and it's a nice place to lean over and do my business.
I went with a center console, but am looking at putting up some kind of a lid with side curtains.

The boat handles windy, choppy conditions extremely well and pretty much keeps the spray away from you. The flat bottom with steep sides really helps stabilize the boat. You could put your family on one side and it would just dip a bit.

My only complaint is the flat bottom really slows you down in choppy conditions. That is a medium light wind that blows against the swell. This sets up a light chop that gets the hull slapping if you go faster than 12 to 13 mph. Just the same I expected this from a dory. On an average day I can cruise about 18 to 22mph which is a very nice speed.

My boat is 23' by 8' but you could do pretty well with smaller version, maybe something 20' by 7 1/2'. This is a consideration if you want to garage it. Don't forget the trailer tongue sticks out another 4 or 5 feet.

larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Postby larryd76 » Fri Apr 20, 2007 2:45 pm

Thanks for the info Basilkies, I checked out your build and its great. This is definitely the type I am looking for. I have checked out the Tolman Skiff and almost sent for the book yesterday, today I will! I have also checked out "The Dory Page" , very interesting. I didn't quite understand if you were saying you liked the internal motor well?

What size Outboard are you using to get her moving at that speed?

As for length, I don't plan on keeping it in a garage, just doing most of the building in there. I will not let the size of the garage dictate the length though. Everyone I boat with always wishes they had another foot or two, so I don't want to undersize.

Am I right in thinking that the flat bottom is best on flat water? Does a slight chop make it harmful to the structure going fast or just majorly uncomfortable?
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!

User avatar
kens
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Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 5:25 pm
Location: Coastal Georgia

Postby kens » Fri Apr 20, 2007 4:38 pm

The flat bottom boat is best on flat water, but that nothing to do with the integrity of the boat in bad water,. The flat bottom is just uncomfortable in bad water, not dangerous or anything.
If you are up in NJ, I am surprised you havent mentioned any lobster boats. They have a trunk cabin and simple boat, vee forward for good entry and flatter transom for good speed. Modest power gets them up on plane.

larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Postby larryd76 » Fri Apr 20, 2007 5:09 pm

Thanks Kens, I did spend a little time after my post really looking at some lobster boats. I love the Idea of having that shelter up front and plenty of room out back for fishing. I need my space when fishing, just a personal like of mine, shoulder to shoulder is not relaxing to me!

I was checking out the Eagle and Double Eagle. They would work fantastic for me.

I still have alot of thinking to do, my head is spinning after searching the world wide web for the last couple of months. I am definitely sticking around on this website and will only use Glen-L plans for the simple reason being, that I found this forum to be very helpful already.
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!

J Patroni
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:20 pm
Location: Cape May, NJ & 1000 Islands, NY

Postby J Patroni » Sun Apr 22, 2007 5:27 am

Hi Larry,

I am in Cape May and building a crackerbox. Not in
the same catagory as what you are looking for, but
non the less it is a Glen-L design.

For my framing lumber I have gotton all my mahogany
from South Jersey Lumberman in Mays Landing. They are
just of the intersection of the Atlantic City Expressway
and RT 50. The place doesn't look by much but thay have
a nice selection of lumber for the marine industry.
They even sell to boat builders like Hacker Craft in Lake Goerge,NY.

Hope you make your choice and start your build soon.

Jim
If you don't build it now, You will regret it later! Already regreting it

Crackerbox Build
http://s232.photobucket.com/albums/ee255/jtpatronimfg/

Checkmate Restoration
http://s232.photobucket.com/albums/ee25 ... 0Starflite

larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Postby larryd76 » Sun Apr 22, 2007 6:48 am

Thanks J Patroni!! That was going to be one of my future questions! One less thing to have to think about is great! I will check them out once I decide on the plans and get the space! Maybe I could swing by sometime and check out your project?
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!

gregggrundon
Posts: 389
Joined: Fri Apr 28, 2006 1:48 am
Location: Kwajalein

Cabin skiff

Postby gregggrundon » Mon Apr 23, 2007 4:26 am

Welcome Larry,

I'm rebuilding an unfinished 30' Jolly Roger. But; In my next life; or, sooner if my wife lets me, I will do the Cabin skiff. Check out the subscriber photo's page. This sounds like it might fit your bill.
It's a stitch and glue construction, which would make for a much quicker and easier build.If this is your first foray into boat building( like it is mine) it may help.

Aloha,

Gregg
Jolly Roger 30'(Extended)
Marshall Islands, R. M. I.

larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Postby larryd76 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 6:12 am

Thanks Gregg, I am still thinking and appreciate all of the input. For some reason and I can't pinpoint it, I would rather go with a framed boat rather than stitch and Glue. I really don't know why I have this in my head but photos on web sites make me think that with frames it might be easier to get set up and curves more exact? If that is wrong feel free to correct me, I am more novice than novice so I may have bad misconceptions??
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!

Amm
Posts: 178
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 9:54 am
Location: Utah

Postby Amm » Mon Apr 23, 2007 10:06 am


larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Postby larryd76 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 11:35 am

Today's thinking is telling me, Hunky Dory. After checking customer photos I am really liking it. Still more thinking going on but I am still in the right ball-park!
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!

basilkies
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:19 pm
Location: Marin California

Postby basilkies » Mon Apr 23, 2007 1:08 pm

kens wrote:The flat bottom boat is best on flat water, but that nothing to do with the integrity of the boat in bad water,. The flat bottom is just uncomfortable in bad water, not dangerous or anything.
If you are up in NJ, I am surprised you havent mentioned any lobster boats. They have a trunk cabin and simple boat, vee forward for good entry and flatter transom for good speed. Modest power gets them up on plane.


This is only half right. The big disadvantage of a flat bottomed boat is moving through choppy or certain types of rough water. The flat bottom is actually an advantage when trolling or drifting to fish. That's because it is much more stabler and doesn't rock side to side like the vee bottoms.

There are other advantages to a flat bottom:

1) you can launch in more launches that are shallower

2) You can beach it easily, if you like to explore

3) It planes easily and is more gas efficient, this is subject to flatter water conditions, somewhat.

4) It is a stabiler boat when you have guys running to the side to net fish.

All boats are compromises, and the dory's compromise is slower speeds in choppy conditions or steep swells.

And in response to the question about the internal motor well. If I built another one I would mount the outboard on the rear.

larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Postby larryd76 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 1:54 pm

I agree about the motor on the rear, Nick. With that being said, do I need to actually have the motor before I start all construction? Or build the transom strong and fit the motor after? I don't know if there are specific angles for different outboards or if mounting brackets take care of that? I am really uninformed in this area!
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!

basilkies
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:19 pm
Location: Marin California

Postby basilkies » Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:20 pm

Transom angles for motors are pretty much the same, 15 degrees or somewhere in there. You shouldn't need to know much about the motor to make the transom fit.

One thing you might like to know is the availability of motors and sizes. You will have to decide on a 20 inch transom or a 25 inch transom. I believe larger motors tend to come in 25 inch. Also, if your in the used market, you may find a wider choice if you plan ahead.

I bet you could easily plan ahead for the variety by building your transom to 25 inches but reenforced it further down in case you wanted to cut it lower.

larryd76
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: Collingswood, New Jersey

Postby larryd76 » Tue Apr 24, 2007 3:11 pm

That's good news, with the investments involved in building the hull and buying a motor. It would be nice to split them up a bit. The dream is still alive!!
I am trolling the info, building my knowledge in anticipation of building my vessel sometime in the next year!!


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