need advice on choosing a build

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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Woody
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need advice on choosing a build

Postby Woody » Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:48 am

I have been dreaming of building a boat for a while now, and now that the shop is nearing completion (40 by 60), I think I am about ready to tackle it. I would like to build a boat that I can take the family out in (possibly tubing when the kids are older) or take a couple fishing buddies on. Either way, I want a safe and as spacious a boat as I can build. Most of the lakes here are fairly shallow, and that may or may not be too much of a factor in choosing the design. I am a fairly accomplished woodworker, have my own sawmill, and I'm pretty mechanically inclined. I am looking for advice on what you guys think about building "the first boat". I don't have much experience with boats, and wonder if tackling a larger sized boat will just be too much. Thanks for any input.

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Postby Nova SS » Fri Apr 27, 2007 11:07 am

larger size as in above 20 feet?

basilkies
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Postby basilkies » Fri Apr 27, 2007 3:03 pm

Since you have a sawmill the first thing I would do is find out which local woods are best for boatbuilding, cut some up and start drying it.

The difficult part about choosing a boat is determining the difference between how you think you will use it from the reality of how it gets used. Since we're talking lake here, you most likely will mostly have two to three people in the boat most times. That's because once you've gone around a lake there's little point in packing everyone in and doing it again.

So, that leaves you with a person tubing out back and another person in the boat with you and everyone else playing on shore. I'd say you could do pretty well with a 17 to 18 foot boat with something like a 90 horse on it. Your going to want very little vee in the hull, because lakes are pretty calm and a flatter bottom is more efficient in calm water.

Just be warned that the motor will cost you more than the boat and trailer although you can do pretty well on the used market. Just be sure that the lake you are going to use allows two strokes or doesn't have an EPA emission policy that limits the motors that can be used. Also, check to see if one is being proposed.

basilkies
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Postby basilkies » Fri Apr 27, 2007 3:03 pm

Since you have a sawmill the first thing I would do is find out which local woods are best for boatbuilding, cut some up and start drying it.

The difficult part about choosing a boat is determining the difference between how you think you will use it from the reality of how it gets used. Since we're talking lake here, you most likely will mostly have two to three people in the boat most times. That's because once you've gone around a lake there's little point in packing everyone in and doing it again.

So, that leaves you with a person tubing out back and another person in the boat with you and everyone else playing on shore. I'd say you could do pretty well with a 17 to 18 foot boat with something like a 90 horse on it. Your going to want very little vee in the hull, because lakes are pretty calm and a flatter bottom is more efficient in calm water.

Just be warned that the motor will cost you more than the boat and trailer although you can do pretty well on the used market. Just be sure that the lake you are going to use allows two strokes or doesn't have an EPA emission policy that limits the motors that can be used. Also, check to see if one is being proposed.

Woody
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Postby Woody » Fri Apr 27, 2007 7:06 pm

Actually, I would like to have around a 18-24 footer, however, I was wondering if I shouldn't start with an 8 foot dinghy or small sailboat or something to get my feet wet. Maybe just a confidence booster, I don't know. I was just trying to get a feel for whether or not I should build a small one first and progress to a larger cabin style that I want to ultimately build or just jump into it. Thanks for your replies.

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DavidMcA
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Postby DavidMcA » Sat Apr 28, 2007 4:10 am

Just go for the big one. Worst case scenario is that you make a few mistakes......but I've yet to find a mistake that couldn't be fixed! The main thing is that you have the perserverance and patience to finish it.
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kens
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Postby kens » Sat Apr 28, 2007 4:30 am

What kind of boat interests you. Such as, which power options, outboard, I/O, inboard?
How fast do you want the boat to go in the end result. This affects the hull design & power you would need.
What kind of cabin space? Full cabin, trunk, cuddy, or simple pilothouse?

basilkies
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Postby basilkies » Sat Apr 28, 2007 5:14 pm

Woody wrote:Actually, I would like to have around a 18-24 footer, however, I was wondering if I shouldn't start with an 8 foot dinghy or small sailboat or something to get my feet wet. Maybe just a confidence booster, I don't know. I was just trying to get a feel for whether or not I should build a small one first and progress to a larger cabin style that I want to ultimately build or just jump into it. Thanks for your replies.


Build a small sailboat, be sure to make it small enough so you can throw it in the big boat when you build it. I guarantee you everyone will spend more time on the little boat than the big boat. Just keep the boat simple with a simple sail, then anyone can learn to use it in minutes.

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I AGREE

Postby PapaDon » Sat Apr 28, 2007 10:16 pm

Nothing, I repeat, NOTHING in this world comes even close to comparing to a day in a small sailboat! I repeat, NOTHING! (But I don't fish...) The whole point is....where do you want to end up?.....
If God had intended for us to have fibreglass boats, we would have fibreglass trees.

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kens
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Re: I AGREE

Postby kens » Sun Apr 29, 2007 4:25 am

PapaDon wrote:Nothing, I repeat, NOTHING in this world comes even close to comparing to a day in a small sailboat! I repeat, NOTHING! (But I don't fish...) The whole point is....where do you want to end up?.....
I did the small sailboat thing, I wanted to end up in the marina, but the wind died, was alreadt sunburnt, and had a long way to go.
You're right, there is nothing like a day in a sailboat, and I been using power boats ever since.........

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Postby J Patroni » Sun Apr 29, 2007 7:05 am

Now that is a statement I agree with. I tried the sailing thing with
someone that was supposed to know what he was doing. He was
sailing for 5 years. He almost killed me in the first 5 minutes.
Scared me so bad I jumped out and swam back to the dock ( about a
1/2 mile) and I have never been in a sail boat again.
That was 45 years ago.
Beside, the shortest distance between two points ia a straight line
and I like to get there quick.
If you don't build it now, You will regret it later! Already regreting it

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Woody
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Postby Woody » Sun Apr 29, 2007 10:04 am

kens wrote:What kind of boat interests you. Such as, which power options, outboard, I/O, inboard?
How fast do you want the boat to go in the end result. This affects the hull design & power you would need.
What kind of cabin space? Full cabin, trunk, cuddy, or simple pilothouse?


Actually, an Inboard is what I would prefer, however, I have never even seen one in operation, let alone know how to set it up. I am pretty good with car motors, and figured that would be the cheapest way for me to power a boat. I have tried to fix a couple of other outboards for friends, and I am just hit or miss as to whether or not I am able to. I guess that might just take some more learning and practice to figure out though. I am pretty sure that I would like to build a boat that had both sail and fuel power (whether outboard, I/O, inboard) as well as fishing amenities and a small to moderate "covered" space so that when I am out fishing and the wife and or kids are getting bored, they could go and play games, sleep, etc. I hope that helps. I would love to have a 30 footer, but I don't want to take 5 years to build her either. I have always had an affection for wooden boats though, so I am sure that I would like to build a wooden one.

Another question that I have is whether or not I could use the abundant supply of Pecan or Ash that I have in the construction of the hull or not. I know it's not quite the same thing, but I sell Pecan, Ash, Mesquite, and Sycamore to some fellas down the road that make Kayak's and Canoe's withe it. They seem to like it real well. They have also built some beautiful vessels.

basilkies
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Postby basilkies » Mon Apr 30, 2007 3:19 pm

Don't let them sell you short on the sailboat. Notice these guys said they tried it once. Suppose they had gone out on a power boat their first time and the engine block blew a softplug. Then they had to come back in a hurry in a sinking boat. Do you think they would be power boating now?

I spent a few summer camping trips playing around with some small sailboats the neighbors had. I ended up buying a catamaran when I was 24 and I raced it. Sailboats are the funnest boats I've been on. You always have something to do besides sit there and try to talk over a running motor about how pretty the scenery is.

I've waterskied, cruised, and fished, but the sailboat was the best. One tip, when your learning start on a beach where the wind is coming from the side or side onshore, unless you have someone there to chase you around in a power boat. After a half hour or so you should be able to go anywhere you want. I taught a buddy to sail in 15 minutes, it took him 20 minutes to tip the boat over, he got it right back up and had a ball.

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kens
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Postby kens » Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:34 pm

basilkies wrote:Don't let them sell you short on the sailboat. Notice these guys said they tried it once.

I am experienced in single-handling a Catalina 20. I bought my own 14' rig, and tried that as my first boat purchase. The Catalina 20 was really good for trolling for fish. You could troll a line right into a school of fish that the birds were hitting, troll right through it. That is, if the schoolof fish wasnt too far away.
And on the 14 footer, I was sunburnt in dead air with a girlfriend. We could see the marina, but couldnt get there in dead air. I looked at her in her sweaty, roasted bikini; looked at the paddle; looked at her, then the paddle. About that time she realized it was either scr_w or row.
She rowed!!

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Postby DavidMcA » Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:41 pm

I think I suddenly need a sailboat :lol:
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