Hunky Dory Build

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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Gayle Brantuk
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Gayle Brantuk » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:57 am

Nice looking build--thanks for posting and sharing your changes with us.

Goodell
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Goodell » Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:22 pm

Baron wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:43 am
That is a fine looking build Goodell.
I'm just beginning to fidget looking for a build to suit my needs. Congrats on finding the 24' panels as that won't happen here in "Dryland". Wonderful.

-Are you going to use a transom mounted outboard?
-Of the Ply that you additionally bought what type was it.
-Had you thought to lengthen or shorten the build?

Big Question:
-Are all of the Pacific dory's sheathed in Glass or are some of them painted only?


Best!
Baron in PA

Thanks Baron! Yes that plywood stash was probably the last of such finds in the state - literally. Yes transom mounted outboard for sure - with what will be a fairly significant splashwell. The additional plywood is marine fir A/B grade from a mill here in Oregon. When I started scarfing it - i would say that the inner plies are probably barely "B" but overall the plywood is a bit harder or resistant to dings (compared to the older stuff) and otherwise fine. pricing was probably nominally cheaper than say hydrotek. So in some ways the hydrotek would be a better value all around. However, the folks on the coast here prefer the marine fir vs hardwoods - I think primarily that fir is kown to be more forgiving under pounding forces ...in other words, it may be seen as inferior by some builders, but when more extreme hydrodynamic forces - it might be more likely to bend than to crack under a shock impact. Maybe with modern epoxy and good layup of weaved glass - it wouldnt be a thing. I dont know.

Pretty much all of the hulls are glassed these days, but it would have been common to see boats glassed on the sole, or just up to the spray rail, then above the spray rail, probably given a couple coats of resin on wood, and painted. Typically, now you see full layup to the gunnels with maybe 20-40oz total on the bottom (with graphite mix) and about 7-10 oz glass on the sides. Then the interior is oiled NOT encapsulated. Many hulls are chopper glassed vs having weaved fabric. Although it may seem sub-par to weaved glass, there is a guy locally who does a really nice job at it and gel coats over that. Some locals prefer the heavier chopper glassed dory - so there is that. I personally wont be doing that.

As for length - not really. The little hunk may be the better boat if you wanted something just under 20'. I think if you used the hunky plans but dropped below 21 or 20, you would need to make changes to the beam so it would just get too complicated I think. If you went considerably over 22-ish I think it just makes it less and less optimal choice for a trailered boat. But thats just me.

One retired builder out here really likes the 21.5 to 22' length for our sea conditions. he believes that length is well adapted for the typical wave conditions/frequency etc in our inland seas. Big enough for a few guys to go after tuna in the summer etc or commercial fish, but still also small enough to trailer, launch and land in the surf with limited help etc. interview with the now retired builder that you might enjoy...despite the shortcomings of the host:) http://hookedonwoodenboats.com/howb-126 ... nerations/

Also, Its important to remember that for these surf launch and landing scenarios here - there is no reason for a V-forward design like the V-dory. Its actually less safe and provides very marginal difference in smoothing out the ride. So that specific purpose is important to consider.

Overall I would say that if you are not needing to go full throttle to fishing grounds offshore; are happy spending most of the time in the 15-20 knot range (obviously WOT is no prob in calm seas); want a lot of boat with smaller power requirements (60-90hp), want a SUPER seaworthy fishing/work boat that is relatively easy to build - this is a great option. hope that helps.
Last edited by Goodell on Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Goodell
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Goodell » Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:23 pm

Gayle Brantuk wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:57 am
Nice looking build--thanks for posting and sharing your changes with us.
Thanks! Just trying to leave some details for future builders. It would be great to see more work-boat folks posting here as you guys have plenty of designs in that arena.

Baron
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Baron » Mon Jan 20, 2020 4:55 pm

You're welcome Goodell,
I grew up on the East coast on a Dairy farm in eastern PA. In the 60's lots of folks were buying up old wooden Silos which were made of clear grained DFir or Sitka. Our barn floor which was built in 55 (now a wedding venue dance floor) is built of silo staves. I sure wish there were DF silos to pull down these days.

For a short period I lived in Humbolt CA and Brookings OR and climbed trees for a living. The old growth fir was awesome. Wish we could still get fir ply of the quality of old. I'll likely use 1088. I like the oiled finish but will likely seal with epoxy.

Although I won't have a vee forward I'll not be launching off the beech. I spend allot of time trailering to very very skinny water (Barnegat, IWC, Ocracoke). Shallow draft is big. Speed is not terribly important. I need a wide boat that is not too long to handle by myself in very tight areas. The Glen-L add for these two boats say they can be shorted or lengthened 3' and I assumed that means without some sort of performance compromise.

Thanks for the builder site.

Baron

Goodell
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Goodell » Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:50 pm

Baron - you might like this build thread on I-fish .https://www.ifish.net/board/showthread.php?t=344329
I think they built this without plans - just pulling lines and measurements off other boats. But the stringer frame design of the Glen-L version is definitely mo' better in my opinion.

I think most folks that change length on the Hunky add footage. I would venture a guess that you might be good taking a foot or so off of it, but I think the ratio of length to beam would start getting iffy shorter than that. Start to turn into a water plow:) If you go under 20' I would look at the Little Hunk - or at least consider the beam of the Little Hunk. Just my two cents. A lot of guys here that I talk to really are tired of muscling the bigger dories and want to go to 19-20ft option.

I bit more sanding, planning and scraping - finally actually ready to glass now! :)
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Baron
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Baron » Tue Jan 21, 2020 6:40 am

Looks beautiful. First boat build I've ever seen at a wedding :lol: . That link you sent from those guys with the Mobile Dimension Sawmill are also doing a nice job but they borrowed their sliding seat idea from a McKenzie Drift Boat, cool. I just finished a fast build (5 Weeks) of a drift boat using one hand while the other was healing from surgery.
IMG_4383.jpg
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Will you leave the sharp edge on the chine ?
Will you glass over the chine or will you glass up to it and then tape over?
You're on your way for sure.

You wrote: "consider the beam of the Little Hunk. Just my two cents". Im officially soliciting every members "two cents" . I have my suspicions that a shortened version might plunge or plow more but I've not heard it mentioned in any of the threads.

I like Little Hunk just fine but I am 6'3" and 265. Wife is tiny.
I wanted a big wide vee-birth, flushing head and stove. It would be tougher to get them into the smaller boat. The plan is to trailer it strategically around the salient points of the 'great loop' as well as IWC and other Canals. The shorter the better. The shallower the better. The wider the better as long a it functions as intended. The wife will rarely be with me so the less to clean and jazz around the better. With the bigger boats you get the bigger scantlings.

Baron
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Baron » Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:13 am

Dang-it-all. Curiosity killed the cat and now I've gone and looked at the little hunk after having ruled it out, thanks allot :?


I meant to ask: Did I see you state that you're using two layers of 3/8" for the bottom? If so Why? Is it so you can replace it more easily, like a sacrificial layer, or is it just for ease of handling?




After years of being on the water in some small form of flotation I promised the wife I'd have a real head and kitchen on the next boat. I'm just getting to the age where I need both to be convenient and at hand.......enough said. I'll build the boat around these two items.

Goodell
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Goodell » Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:41 pm

Baron wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:13 am
Dang-it-all. Curiosity killed the cat and now I've gone and looked at the little hunk after having ruled it out, thanks allot :?


I meant to ask: Did I see you state that you're using two layers of 3/8" for the bottom? If so Why? Is it so you can replace it more easily, like a sacrificial layer, or is it just for ease of handling?

After years of being on the water in some small form of flotation I promised the wife I'd have a real head and kitchen on the next boat. I'm just getting to the age where I need both to be convenient and at hand.......enough said. I'll build the boat around these two items.
I know - the "Little Hunk" aint really little. It should be called the "Medium Hunk". Nice proportions. If you were looking for say a 19-20' boat I would add length to the Little Hunk vs take away from the Hunky. If you go less than 19 - its your boat for sure I would think. Still pretty big boat really.

Oh yeah gotcha. yeah Im 6'4" and actually added a bit of height to the sides of the Hunky to feel a bit more contained in seas. You definitely have some good room there for a cabin if you go with the hunky- but like I said maybe the Little Hunk can still contain a nice cabin. Maybe the Glen-L folks have an opinion about the minimum recommended length for the Hunky?

...yeah its hard to see from that last pic but there is a rounded edge over the chine and bow lines and sides of the transom and i will use fiberglass tape on all edges, then side and bottom layup will overlap that. The 22oz bottom layer will also overlap a bit on the sides. the sides will have `10oz layer. I may add an additional 10oz layer to the bottom to bring it to 30+.

The bottom will also get 3-5 coats of a graphite epoxy coating that goes up the sides about 4 inches or so. THe boat's bottom get A LOT of contact with sand and small rocks.

The two layers of ply came about mostly because I had a lot of 3/8 material, it is super easy to manipulate over a turn, and it definitely seems to have made the bottom much more rigid than the one 1/2" layer... Kind of up-engineered for the landings which are often at speed. Also because i had to toss out the bottom strakes in the plans (which add structure and rigidity to the bottom), I felt it was important to add rigidity in their absence. I am trying to be cautious about added weight but decided to sacrifice that concern and add stringers and bottom layer. Prob added 150 lbs of material or so. I am also adding knees to the transom.

One thing that is REALLY popular here are the side boxes. It not only gives a place to store stuff, cut bait, clean fish and layout lures etc, but they provide a really nice brace when fishing near the sides...since the side flare is significant. Here is an example from a local boat.
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Baron
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Baron » Thu Jan 23, 2020 6:01 pm

Well that explains allot about your boat bottom. Side boxes are nice however I get very nervous about any enclosed spaces within the structure of anything that is exposed to water. Are those boxes heartily vented? I saw another boat that had ply inner side panels that appeared to attached to the self bailing sole I'd be so nervous about unseen rot and odor causing trapped debris.

When you attached the second bottom how did you ensure that you got tight bond btwn the two layers and not have air pockets? In his sharpie book Ruell Parker cut ply into narrow planks and then stapled them down with Monel staples on pretty close centers. Did you use weight. Here is what some folks use on their Don Hill Driftboats: https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/amazin ... ®-2-lb-kit. might be easier but I've not priced it yet.

The reason I asked you how you were going to glass the hull is because I'm so sloppy at it that I always like to hear how folks do it. I always thought that 10 oz was about all the heavier that could be bent over the chines. Glad to hear it isn't so. Would love to see a photo study on the glassing part. Maybe there is a spare bride or groom floating around the tent with a camera.

Pretty cool.

Goodell
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Goodell » Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:35 pm

Baron wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 6:01 pm
Well that explains allot about your boat bottom. Side boxes are nice however I get very nervous about any enclosed spaces within the structure of anything that is exposed to water. Are those boxes heartily vented? I saw another boat that had ply inner side panels that appeared to attached to the self bailing sole I'd be so nervous about unseen rot and odor causing trapped debris.

When you attached the second bottom how did you ensure that you got tight bond btwn the two layers and not have air pockets? In his sharpie book Ruell Parker cut ply into narrow planks and then stapled them down with Monel staples on pretty close centers. Did you use weight. Here is what some folks use on their Don Hill Driftboats: https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/amazin ... ®-2-lb-kit. might be easier but I've not priced it yet.

The reason I asked you how you were going to glass the hull is because I'm so sloppy at it that I always like to hear how folks do it. I always thought that 10 oz was about all the heavier that could be bent over the chines. Glad to hear it isn't so. Would love to see a photo study on the glassing part. Maybe there is a spare bride or groom floating around the tent with a camera.

Pretty cool.
Most of the folks operating these dories here only oil the wood on the interior including the boxes. They dont seem to have problems - but this fleet of dories are ever moored - always trailered, drained, covered (usually). The boxes are not enclosed in the sense that they are more like trays with bottom cubbyholes.

I dont know that I did a perfect job attaching it...I just rolled on unthickened epoxy to both sides, then troweled on thickened epoxy on the boat side, dropped the second layer down (two pieces) and fastened using 1" ring shank S-bronze nails in longitudinal rows along the stringer, about every 4-5 inches - first starting in the center of the center stringer - then moving up the center to the bow then back to the transom - then moving left and right of center on the next stringer and so forth. It might not be perfect but I had squeeze out along the entire outside edge on all sides. I drove some screws along the outside edges also.

As for glassing - I have to go back and look but I think the tape I have that will go around all the edges is maybe 8oz. The 10 wont go over the chine but I might try to see about an additional 10oz layer over top of, or under the 22oz bottom layer. - for just the bottom. Keep in mind that the chine has a rounded edge and the side is a 30 degree angle. So the transition could be worse. Ill take pics - hopefully it will go ok.

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kens
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by kens » Fri Jan 24, 2020 6:42 am

What about Sweet Caroline?
pros and cons?
Oak is over rated, everything about it takes extra time; then it warps, splits or checks !!! :roll:

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DrBryanJ
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by DrBryanJ » Fri Jan 24, 2020 7:08 am

Baron: Having been on some of the waters you mention (Barnegat, Raritan, NY Harbor), I think you would want some deadrise at the transom. What about the Kokanee. It can be done at 19'. I fairly sure a cabin from the dories could be added instead of the center console.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."
We're still happily married, but now she just wants "the dam boat out of the garage."

Baron
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Baron » Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:01 am

Hi Ken,
Years ago Sweet Caroline was one of the first boats that I was smitten by. Lovely lines, motor well, shallow draft, narrow and easily driven hull form and straightforward construction methods. It is the quintessential boat for choppy local lakes, protected bays and rivers with a modest current. I could see using this in all weather for the above but not in inlets or with a cabin. Its the perfect trailer boat or dock boat for three-four fishermen working from a vacation destination.
Since those days long ago I learned that a cabin is nice and that a boat with longer legs to rougher destinations would fit my needs better. I know Caroline can be stretched 10% but it would still have a narrow floor of only 4'. Furthermore the run of the chines are flat, flat as a pancake, perfect for North Carolina bay chop but not if you're in the middle of Pimlico Sound when a storm approaches. I wouldn't want to come or go from inlets with this hull. Great platform as an open boat.
The larger pacific Dorys appear to be much more able to handle mixed up stuff in the late afternoon on the Chesapeake and Long Island sound providing one slows the vessel down a bit. They look fine for Barnegat, Atlantic City and Cape May inlets. In reasonable weather I'd think one could regularly cross from Cape May to Cape Henlopen.
Its easy to talk big, I'm good at it but I can say I'd never have taken my v238 Carolina Skiff across there.
Do you have or have an eye for the Sweet Caroline?
Baron

Baron
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Baron » Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:40 am

DrBryanJ,
I could be wrong but I think Deadrise at the transom is overrated especially when in very thin water. At Tices shoal on Barnegat I used to beach boats in only inches of water. As far as Raritan and NYH I use the back creek shipping channel 'Arthur Kill", (watch the moorings and stone markers).

Hey you found a great boat name: "She's Getting a Divorce" or many of similar iterations.

Baron
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Re: Hunky Dory Build

Post by Baron » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:07 am

Doc,
Couple more things: once you've summer vacationed in areas like Ocracoke or Barnegat, in boats with retractable keels or flat bottoms, you may note ever want dead rise again. I spent endless sunny days walking around in ankle - knee deep water pulling the boat behind me while crabbing and clamming.
I am not really able to perform most maintenance anymore which makes an outboard look a little more attractive.

Lastly, with regards to Kokanee, there is a plethora of used boats to be had on the cheap in that category. It appears wonderful for use when fishing out of Destin FL, Philadelphia or New London.

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