Newbie, in every sense of the word

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JoshA
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:33 pm

Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by JoshA » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:38 pm

Hello,

I am looking to build a boat (aren't we all on this site?). I have no experience in anything woodworking aside from cutting down big trees and splitting them for the last several years.

I am looking to get feedback on how hard this is going to be for someone in my situation. What tools I will need, how much time I could look at investing, how much dollars this could be and how much my marriage could suffer?

ANY HELP would be GREATLY appreciated. For an example to base off of, the design i would like to do is either the Monaco or Riviera plans. I am in Plymouth, MN.

Thank you. Josh.

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Lowka53
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Location: Ogden, Utah-Jubilee build
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Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by Lowka53 » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:24 pm

depending on what you boat you build depends on your knowledge but other people here have built boats with little or no knowledge of wood working. and the people on this forum are very helpful. so don't be afraid to make the attempt to build one the tools required depends on how much you can get away with :roll: :lol: as far as the boss if you don't have there support you are lost :lol: the cost varies with each boat but if i remeber right is is around half the cost to build the boat than buying it out right :wink:

on main page
Gather tools needed. Boatbuilding does not require exotic tools (unless you wish to use your project as an excuse to the spouse). A table saw would obviously be a great option, but is not necessary. Basic hand tools are adequate as well as a bunch of c-clamps. For additional suggestions on tools, see the Index of Articles in the Newsletter section of our website
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
http://www.facebook.com/Home.Made.Boat.Building
Bon Voyage-"Wild Flower" 40' house boat being built
14' Mr John-being built
32' Supper Huck-in design

Rod H

JoshA
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:33 pm

Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by JoshA » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:30 pm

Lowka53 wrote:depending on what you boat you build depends on your knowledge but other people here have built boats with little or no knowledge of wood working. and the people on this forum are very helpful. so don't be afraid to make the attempt to build one the tools required depends on how much you can get away with :roll: :lol: as far as the boss if you don't have there support you are lost :lol: the cost varies with each boat but if i remeber right is is around half the cost to build the boat than buying it out right :wink:
Thanks. The wife is very supportive, but we both would like to know what this is going to look like as far as time, money, etc. for either the Monaco or Riviera. How big of a shop space do I need for this as well?

Thanks.

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Lowka53
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Location: Ogden, Utah-Jubilee build
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Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by Lowka53 » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:40 pm

Davelott will pipe in soon I'am sure he is the one who could tell you best he resentlly finished the riviera and she is a beautiful boat
Don't be afraid to attempt anything. You might surprise your self in the attempt.
http://www.facebook.com/Home.Made.Boat.Building
Bon Voyage-"Wild Flower" 40' house boat being built
14' Mr John-being built
32' Supper Huck-in design

Rod H

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ttownshaw
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Location: Owasso, Oklahoma
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Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by ttownshaw » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:42 pm

Welcome Josh, and yes...Dave will chime in soon with his thoughts on these designs.
Bill

I told my wife we needed a three-car garage for my projects...she told me to ask her for permission next time before I buy a house.
http://www.unitybuild.net

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jamundsen
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Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by jamundsen » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:58 pm

I'm at one year and have about one more to go. I started with a partial frame that someone else started.The Monte Carlo that I'm building is quite a bit larger than the Riviera so the Riv should go quicker. Dave L built his in one year. Costs will vary with builders. I have scrounged every where to cut costs and still use good materials. You dont want to use inferior materials. Ebay, craigs list, donor boats and boat shows like Taveres are great sources of parts. Right now I'm getting close to $11,000. Every time I think I have everything i need I find something else I just have to have.
John Amundsen
Monte Carlo
Lakeland,Fl

Work tends to get in the way of boat building

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ttownshaw
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Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by ttownshaw » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:59 pm

Every time I think I have everything i need I find something else I just have to have.
So true!
Bill

I told my wife we needed a three-car garage for my projects...she told me to ask her for permission next time before I buy a house.
http://www.unitybuild.net

fergal butler
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Location: Co.Dublin, Ireland.

Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by fergal butler » Wed Jul 14, 2010 3:28 pm

Hi and welcome, my malahini was built in a year of nights and weekends,I spent about €3000 on her but had a lot of hardwood to start with and built the engine from two scrap ones, I only have basic DIY skills and found the malahini with the help from here very easy to build and a great starter boat for me. I am now building the crackerbox to learn about inboard engines and maybe one day go for a Monaco or riviera and yes I am still married but she say's she will kill me if I ever use the electric planer at 7am on a sunday morning again. :lol:

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Iggy
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Location: Leduc (Edmonton), Alberta

Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by Iggy » Wed Jul 14, 2010 3:41 pm

I am a newbie also thats 10 months into a Malahini build.

1 Step at a time. You only need the tools for the next step.. and most of the time it involves a lot of clamps and any number of tools can be used to get it done.

The investment steps are pretty small and manageable as you go. Plans... fasteners... lumber.. adhesive (epoxy).. step by step you build.. learn what you need to do the next step.. get any missing tools/materials and so on and so forth.

I don't regret a single moment... I'd do it again in a heartbeat (a lot do.. just for the fun of it).

Glen-L Inboards are beautiful boats.. if you got the room to build them.. I am sure you won't regret it either.

The plans.. Glen-L books, staff and boatbuilder community here is absolutely top-notch for helping out when you get stuck on a step.

I did a lot of reading.. learning boat terminology.. what a 'chine' is.. and browsed the customer photo sectionfor inspiration.

Clamps... lots of clamps.. all kinds.. shapes... start collecting ;)
Ian (aka Iggy)
My Malahini Build

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DaveLott
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Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by DaveLott » Wed Jul 14, 2010 6:13 pm

Hello Josh.

I will give you some advise. If you have an opposing thumb to a finger and can hold a can of beverage of your choice you can build a boat. Build what you want and don't be afraid. There is a ton of experience and advise on this board that helped me thru and they will be right there with you as well. There is one gent down in FL that had never worked with wood in his life but built a Monaco and did a fine job at that. So you can too.

Now regarding tools: I started with a jig saw, circular saw, router, drill, belt sander and a few other small items. With that I built my boat until I got to the deck. At that point I added some bigger shop equipment found at an estate sale. Having a full shop is not necessary. Just the will.

Costs and times vary. It is up to you how you dress your boat up and how long it takes you. I only request one thing - please don't try to build one of the cold molded boats such as the Monaco, Riviera, Tahoe, Monte Carlo, Belle Isle or Barrelback in one single year. It is HARD on body and family.

I spent almost 900 hours in actual construction not including studying and planning. ALL in one year aside from my more than full time job. Get the picture. I dressed my boat up a lot more than I first envisioned so my costs came in close to $22K. I have seen numbers on boats like Midnight running from the low teens to pushing 50K. How well you shop and innovate is under your control

So, what are you waiting for. We want pix of your frame by next weekend. :lol:
dave
Dave

Riviera build - the Midnight Cry Project
Glen-L Sea Kayak
Mahalo Standup Paddleboard

Video of Midnight in Action

Few things in the world measure up to the thrill and satisfaction of boating in a boat that you built.

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areame
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Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by areame » Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:11 pm

hello josh,

I'm also a first time builder and completely new to everything. I've never cut wood before except when cutting Christmas trees and this was the first time I had used a table saw, jig saw, and circular saw. I'm starting out with building a Squirt as it's suppose to be good for beginners and a sort a mini of the Monaco and Riviera.

When I was researching my build and in the same place as you are now I was looking for pricing and some good advice I found, and am now realizing true, is to get an estimate of the kind of build you want to produce, and then add 20% to 50% more to your estimate. As for tools, a table saw is a good idea for the long wood you'll be using for those boat choices (chines, sheers, etc.), unless you can get it pre-cut. As said before you just pick things up as you go along. The nice thing is that you don't have to pay a large amount of money right away, it can be spread it out.

Although it can be a bit intimidating, don't let that scare you; just watching your boat take shape can ease your nerves and is very exciting!


Anthony

JoshA
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:33 pm

Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by JoshA » Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:01 am

jamundsen wrote:I'm at one year and have about one more to go. I started with a partial frame that someone else started.The Monte Carlo that I'm building is quite a bit larger than the Riviera so the Riv should go quicker. Dave L built his in one year. Costs will vary with builders. I have scrounged every where to cut costs and still use good materials. You dont want to use inferior materials. Ebay, craigs list, donor boats and boat shows like Taveres are great sources of parts. Right now I'm getting close to $11,000. Every time I think I have everything i need I find something else I just have to have.

Now, let me pose a question. For re-sale value I am sure these replicas go for far less than a truly restored boat, correct? Where do I find partial framed boats or junkers that can be restored if that is going to save me money? My idea is to build my 1st boat and maybe sell it (hard to say, and I dont know how hard it is to turn a profit on these?), then that should give me money to expand my work space, tools, etc. and move onto a bigger and longer lasting project that I will keep. Thoughts?

JoshA
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:33 pm

Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by JoshA » Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:03 am

fergal butler wrote:Hi and welcome, my malahini was built in a year of nights and weekends,I spent about €3000 on her but had a lot of hardwood to start with and built the engine from two scrap ones, I only have basic DIY skills and found the malahini with the help from here very easy to build and a great starter boat for me. I am now building the crackerbox to learn about inboard engines and maybe one day go for a Monaco or riviera and yes I am still married but she say's she will kill me if I ever use the electric planer at 7am on a sunday morning again. :lol:

Hmm. . . . Maybe I should start out smaller, or are these plans easy enough that I can do the Monaco or Riviera without much of a knowledge issue in boatbuilding? Where does one go to buy the mahogany and other hardwood needed?

JoshA
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:33 pm

Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by JoshA » Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:05 am

Iggy wrote:I am a newbie also thats 10 months into a Malahini build.

1 Step at a time. You only need the tools for the next step.. and most of the time it involves a lot of clamps and any number of tools can be used to get it done.

The investment steps are pretty small and manageable as you go. Plans... fasteners... lumber.. adhesive (epoxy).. step by step you build.. learn what you need to do the next step.. get any missing tools/materials and so on and so forth.

I don't regret a single moment... I'd do it again in a heartbeat (a lot do.. just for the fun of it).

Glen-L Inboards are beautiful boats.. if you got the room to build them.. I am sure you won't regret it either.

The plans.. Glen-L books, staff and boatbuilder community here is absolutely top-notch for helping out when you get stuck on a step.

I did a lot of reading.. learning boat terminology.. what a 'chine' is.. and browsed the customer photo sectionfor inspiration.

Clamps... lots of clamps.. all kinds.. shapes... start collecting ;)
Thanks for the advice. What do you figure is the biggest outlay as far as expense goes? The engine or the hardwood?

JoshA
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:33 pm

Re: Newbie, in every sense of the word

Post by JoshA » Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:12 am

DaveLott wrote:Hello Josh.

I will give you some advise. If you have an opposing thumb to a finger and can hold a can of beverage of your choice you can build a boat. Build what you want and don't be afraid. There is a ton of experience and advise on this board that helped me thru and they will be right there with you as well. There is one gent down in FL that had never worked with wood in his life but built a Monaco and did a fine job at that. So you can too.

Now regarding tools: I started with a jig saw, circular saw, router, drill, belt sander and a few other small items. With that I built my boat until I got to the deck. At that point I added some bigger shop equipment found at an estate sale. Having a full shop is not necessary. Just the will.

Costs and times vary. It is up to you how you dress your boat up and how long it takes you. I only request one thing - please don't try to build one of the cold molded boats such as the Monaco, Riviera, Tahoe, Monte Carlo, Belle Isle or Barrelback in one single year. It is HARD on body and family.

I spent almost 900 hours in actual construction not including studying and planning. ALL in one year aside from my more than full time job. Get the picture. I dressed my boat up a lot more than I first envisioned so my costs came in close to $22K. I have seen numbers on boats like Midnight running from the low teens to pushing 50K. How well you shop and innovate is under your control

So, what are you waiting for. We want pix of your frame by next weekend. :lol:
dave

Thanks for the advice Dave. With tools, does it matter on the quality/brand of them or am I fine just getting whatever operates? If I wanted to build a boat in under a year that was similar to the Monaco or Riviera, which would you recommend? I ask as I am not seeking to alienate my wife and dogs.

Does it make a difference on the wood if I am working on the boat in the winter in a less that normal temp shop? Being in MN, things tend to expand and contract with the seasons.

Yeah, I am trying to figure out how I can manage this with my full time job, a 20hr/wk part time job and being only a year married. My wife is fortunately very understanding. But, I know that can only last for so long.

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