Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Here is where we get to welcome all new members.
New members please include your location - Other members close to you may be of great help in locating materials and other needs.

Moderator: Bill Edmundson

billsfan
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 5:27 pm

Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby billsfan » Sun Mar 26, 2017 10:57 am

After 40 years of teaching during the school year and doing carpentry In the summer we have moved to Weiss Lake in north eastern Alabama. Our sailboat is the wrong critter for this lake and will be replaced (sadly) with a power boat that draws less water.

Having had no luck finding a replacement that doesn't require the sale of body parts and viable organ donation to pay for we have determined several of the Glen L offerings fit the bill just fine.

The carpentry doesn't scare me, but I'm more than a little concerned about the whole fiberglass part of the build. Any input from the smart guys on the process is greatly appreciated.

User avatar
hoodman
Posts: 1057
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby hoodman » Sun Mar 26, 2017 4:13 pm

The fiberglass is nothing to be scared of. It is basically a thin cloth that is bonded to the hull with epoxy. It becomes essentially armor for the hull. There is a whole book and DVD in the Glen-l catalog dedicated to it and lots of us here that have been through the process. Once you complete and fair your hull you roll on a thin coat of epoxy to seal the surface and let it cure. Then lay the cloth on smoothing it out with your hands. You can trim the cloth to size at this point. What I did at this point was pour epoxy on and spread it around with a plastic squeegee type tool. With the first coat you are only saturating the cloth without trying to fill the weave (the weave is like burlap). It will take two to three more coats to fill the weave and then you can sand everything smooth.

This is all a pretty simplistic overview but I hope it gives you an idea. Once you get to that point you'll have a pretty good comfort level working with epoxy which will help a lot.

What designs are you considering?

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1045
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby chugalug » Mon Mar 27, 2017 1:27 am

:D I am far from smart,however will pass along what I like to do with epoxy-I mix in small batches using slow hardener and pour mix into paint trays so epoxy doesn't set up too fast.then pour onto cloth and work through weave with foam rollers and squeegee.(Glen-L has all those in epoxy kit) sometimes white areas are air bubbles that need attention by applying more epoxy and squeegee work.follow Glen-L's advice and start on transom area first.sometimes helps to lay cloth on boat and let it set overnight.I used fibreglass kit for my design from Glen-l. :D
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

User avatar
hoodman
Posts: 1057
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby hoodman » Mon Mar 27, 2017 5:45 am

Starting on the transom might be the way you want to go. However, also consider starting on the bottom so you are not working on a vertical surface. Springtime or fall would probably be the best times to do the job due to the cooler temps giving you a longer working time but still warm enough to help the epoxy cure (unless you have a climate controlled shop). I did mine in the dead of winter and used a space heater to blow warm air under the hull to help curing but it still took me a lot longer to finish.

User avatar
Bill Edmundson
Posts: 10314
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 6:45 am
Location: Birmingham, AL, USA
Contact:

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby Bill Edmundson » Mon Mar 27, 2017 6:53 am

Welcome,

Don't worry about it right now. We'll get you through the glassing. I come help. But, I've developed epoxy sensitivity and can only take very limited exposure.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

JimmY
Posts: 482
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby JimmY » Mon Mar 27, 2017 9:37 am

Having just completed glassing my boat, I can say that this part is not that hard. It just takes some patience and discipline to know when to stop working it and step away to let it cure. Just think of epoxy and thick paint.

I used foam rollers (available at Big orange, referred to as "hot dog" rollers) to apply the epoxy. I think the rollers allow you to put down an even coat. I tried plastic spreaders and squeegees in a few spots and always got drag lines in the epoxy. I've got to buy a new roller tray since mine is filled with cured epoxy and has several rollers stuck to it (can you say modern art?).

One trick I learned here was to heat up the hull before rolling on the epoxy, and then turn off the heat afterwards. This helped to minimize bubbles in the epoxy from the raw wood. Once the epoxy had set up, I would turn on the heater again to speed the cure time.

The main problem I had was not long board sanding after the fill coats were done. I used a ROS and while it was fast and evened out the orange peel from the rollers, it left and made some low spots in the surface that would not look good under glossy paint. For a long board I used a strip of 1/4" plywood about 18" long with some handles and self adhesive sand paper. This allows you to level and fair the surface. So, I ended up building up several low spots with 3 or 4 layers of epoxy and a lot of sanding.

Search some of the longer building blogs here, and you will find several different techniques for glassing. Your choice will depend on the type of construction (plywood vs. cold molded, etc...), if you are doing a painted or bright finish, your building location, and amount of help on hand.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

billsfan
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 5:27 pm

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby billsfan » Wed Mar 29, 2017 6:31 pm

Thanks for all the input. Not as scared of the glass work now. The plan is to begin the build on a Nomad or Carioca design this fall when the lake level here falls below what my sailboat can handle getting into our cove. Then do my best to finish the build by April next year. If all goes well 2018 -19 is all about building a Lazy Daze. I know all about "the best laid plans" but as an official geezer now it's time to depend on the "iron jib" for my propulsion off into the sunset.

I'll try to keep the stupid questions to no more than one a day and have no problem being laughed at as long as you don't name the screw up after me. "I see Orville pulled a Jimbob with that transom!" "Y'all shoulda seen that Jimbob he floated in on, but it sank!".

Thanks again for the guidance

User avatar
hoodman
Posts: 1057
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby hoodman » Thu Mar 30, 2017 8:47 am

I'm going to tell you to go ahead and build the boat you ultimately want instead of building a smaller boat first. Unless you just intentionally want two boats in the end.

billsfan
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 5:27 pm

Re: Dazed and Confused in Alabama

Postby billsfan » Thu Mar 30, 2017 12:48 pm

Figured smaller first effort makes for smaller problems along with gaining experience before the big build. As for the need for two boats, wife wants one of her own so two aren't a problem.


Return to “New Members, Please Introduce Yourself”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests