Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

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Anders
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Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 9:09 am
Location: Telemark, Norway

Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by Anders »

I'm considering building a sailboat after (almost) completing my Power Skiff 14, and the GL 19 seems to suit my needs quite well - and it's sailing that I like best. I'm curious about the sailing capabilities, especially a little bit off coast. I understand of course that a boat this size with a center board is no offshore cruiser, but I need a boat that can be sailed single handed (if absolutely necessary, I can use both hands :lol: ) and stored easily in my backyard. So a bigger cruiser is probably out of the question for several reasons, not the least economy-wise.

I've been contemplating the Amigo and several other designs, but what I like about the 19 is trailerability, build costs, roomy cabin (?) and that I can use an outboard engine (which I already own). Also rigging, building complexity and other issues are important.

Any views/opinions/experiences on the GL 19 and other designs for the same purpose are welcome! I'm interested in hearing your thoughts on the trade-off between transport/storage/cost on one hand and off shore capacity/sturdiness/roominess on the other.

Anders
(Norway)

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AAARGH
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Location: Redondo Beach, Ca. USA

Re: Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by AAARGH »


upspirate

Re: Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by upspirate »

That is a great looking boat!

slug
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Joined: Sat Sep 22, 2007 9:49 am
Location: Colborne ON Can

Re: Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by slug »

Have to agree with aargh here. Especially the more traditional look of the build by Dave Cross (see photos ). Of course thats personal preferance, but the improved headroom would be nice.
Doug

Rob Myran
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Re: Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by Rob Myran »

The GL 19 looks like it would have similar space to a Precision 18 where the Ensenada 25 looks like it would be more like my Precision 21 or a Precision 23.

If sailed with an eye to the weather and changing conditions, either 'could' make a good coastal cruiser. As with all things about sailboats "It Depends" on normal conditions where you sail and the use you want to put your boat to. Will you mostly day sail, or do you plan short overnight cruises? Do you want to do some more extended cruising while living aboard? And, do you really want to do more off shore sailing? With longer cruising and off shore sailing sea kindliness and sea worthiness become a bigger part of the equation. Whether you will sail solo or want company along will also effect the size of the boat you should have.

The Amigo has full standing headroom and is designed to be an offshore mini-cruiser. The others have full crouching headroom which would get to be a pain on long passages. All designs are trailerable. The Amigo and Ensenada will need a bigger tow vehicle.

Generally, I think the adage that small boats get used and large boats sit holds true, and one should build the smallest boat that fits your needs and desires and budget (both money and time).

One place to start on figuring out the roominess of the GL19 ( or the others) is to mock up the interior space with cardboard and tape. Use planks and bricks or a couple cots or whatever you have at hand to lay out the salon seats/berths, at the proper leg height, and put a ceiling over it to understand the headroom. Add a box to represent a portable toilet, mock up the area for galley space chart table, storage. Storage is always hard. Cooler, food, kitchen stuff, clothes, more clothes, sleeping bags, etc. Now don't forget the boatstuff that has to be stored: Sails, safety equipment, spare parts, etc.....
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

Anders
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Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 9:09 am
Location: Telemark, Norway

Re: Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by Anders »

Thanks for your reply, Rob. I agree with your contemplations. I'm not quite sure how I will be using the boat yet. I think in a way the boat will of course decide the use, and I don't require long offshore passages or night sailing. At least not yet.

Primarily I'm thinking a friend and me, or just me, on cruises for a weekend or up to a week, sailing during the day and at sheltered anchoring or in port for the night. The Norwegian coast where I live near by (southeast, west side of the Oslo fjord), has a lot of islands and small fjords that makes it ideal for this kind of leisurely cruising. It's also possible to go up north along the coast and then hop over on the east side of the fjord and down along the Swedish coast which is similarly cluttered with islands and hide-away coves and bays. Very charming!

I have considered the Amigo and Ensenada as well, but they won't be practically trailerable for me, I would need something much heavier than my current car. I'm also considering the possibility of bringing the boat on trailer as far as the Baltic sea, Swedish side, over to Åland - an island paradise between Sweden and Finland. Also the German North Sea coast, with the Frisian Island where "The Riddle Of The Sands" take place, is within reach. And so I think maybe the light weight and smaller height (and shallow draft) of the GL 19 would be preferable.

I guess the GL 19 will be solid enough for this kind of cruising, where I'll never be really far from shore. But I'm a little curious where to store freshwater and all the other stuff, like you say... :shock:

I have also looked at another designs, especially the Mist from Karl Stambaugh. It's heavier than the GL 19, and although the plans are cheaper than for the GL 19, it requires lofting and even if I think I'll manage that, I do like the quality of the drawings and plans and the building description that Glen-L provides.

Thanks again for your thoughts :)

Anders

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Stuart
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Re: Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by Stuart »

I know very little about sailing but some GL boats look nicer than others. The 15' Minuet can be made into a lovely boat at about 400lbs. The Tango, also a nice boat at about 600lbs but the nicest has got to be the 21ft fancy free. Lovely boat and about 700lbs.

A fresh water system is usually a small tank under the forward bunk with a manual pump ($75) over a small plastic or stainless sink ($50). You could drain the sink out a polymer through hull ($5) below the sink on the topsides. There are small tanks of about 10 gallons ($75) that are reasonably priced, pipe and fittings for fresh water are inexpensive ($25) and a polymer deck fill ($20). It's nice to be able to brush your teeth, shave or heat up a kettle for a cup of soup. There are a lot of low cost portable stoves available. It's also nice to heat up a hot water bottle and toss it in your bunk before bed. That will keep you very comfy.

What you may want is a head. That can require a bit of thought. A portable might be enough for your needs. The bucket on a rope may not work out well in port.

Stuart

Anders
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 9:09 am
Location: Telemark, Norway

Re: Glen-L 19, trade-off between size and off shore capability?

Post by Anders »

Thanks for your reply, Stuart. I agree on your views of the boats, but unfortunately they all have the sort of centerboard that sticks up in the cabin and takes quite a lot of room. The GL19 has a cb that doesn't stick up into the cabin. I've been comparing plans and Karl Stambaugh's Mist looks pretty much like the GL19 hullwise and I'm thinking about maybe changing the cabin of the GL19 to look like the Tango/Fancy Free/Mist and such alikes, if I can make it look nice and not change the buoyancy. The hulls are quite similar on most of these small "gunkholing" sailboats. I also like the gaff rig, so maybe I'll go for the Mist.

As for fresh water, I've been thinking as simple as a 20 litre ( 5 gallon?) plastic can like the ones I've been using for camping on car trips, but I also like your idea about something more permanently fixed in the boat. There's a company here in Norway and Sweden that sells cheap supplies for that sort of things. They also sell a small portapotti head designed for small boat use that I think I can fit under the forward bunks. That'll do for this kind of gunkhole/coastal cruising, at least for me :)
I also have a portable camping stove that I can use in such a boat. Nothing much or fancy, but I think it's more about the experiences you get with boating, and keeping the cost down. It's that, or not get to sea at all :)

Anders

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