Fasteners for amigo frames

Dinghies, day sailers, world cruisers. Many small sailboats make ideal rowboats or low-speed power boats.

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walker
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 2:35 pm
Location: Woodstock, IL

Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by walker »

Hey everyone,
I am building the Amigo ( 22' w/ lead keel) on a budget and was wondering what would be the most affordable bolts I could use to join the frames, floors, wood keel etc. If silicon bronze is my only option does anyone know were I can buy it at a discount?

Cranky Badger
Posts: 268
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 12:06 am
Location: BC coast

Re: Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by Cranky Badger »

If I could make a suggestion - structural stuff like framing probably isn't the best place to economize. At least if the hull itself is built from top-shelf material, you can do whatever you like with the interior, electronics, rigging, etc because that can always be upgraded later.

That said, galvanized hardware is pretty common on workboats - just be sure they are accessible to inspect and replace as needed.
-Brian

"Do or do not. There is no try."
- Yoda

Rob Myran
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Viroqua, Wisconsin

Re: Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by Rob Myran »

I agree with Cranky Badger. You want to build the basics: Frames Fasteners, hull materials with the best stuff available.

If you have all the hours of labor invested and the hull is sub-quality it won't mater how nice the interior, sails, and other things are. You will have a poor quality boat. Build a strong foundation, and save on the frills so you can upgrade them as you can afford to.
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

Oyster
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Joined: Sun Jul 02, 2006 7:10 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by Oyster »

walker wrote:Hey everyone,
I am building the Amigo ( 22' w/ lead keel) on a budget and was wondering what would be the most affordable bolts I could use to join the frames, floors, wood keel etc. If silicon bronze is my only option does anyone know were I can buy it at a discount?
Well this post maybe considered harsh, but something that you should consider out of the gate. We are talking about a boat which is a luxuary unless you make a living with it. So with all due respect, when you are offshore with your family, budgets sometimes will not get you home in one piece and truely should be the last thing on your mind in the early stages of building. Plan for the worse case scenerios in the beginning or you will be yet another one of those guys with greyed out firewood in the backyard.

While we all like to pay as we go, and its quite possible that we may have overspent in the beginning, the key issue is to make sure that you can afford this boat and see it to fruition, even if it takes several years. Part of the process is the stamia to endure crisis and unexpected shortcomings, bits and pieces costing more than what you had planned for. While you may also price out bits and pieces now, stuff that will be used down the road, these bits and pieces may also cost more when you get ready to buy them if out of the gate you are working on a limited budget, also buying parts as you use them.

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jamundsen
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Location: Lakeland, Fl
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Re: Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by jamundsen »

If you figure the total cost of your build then using silico bronze fastners is really a small percentage of the total.
John Amundsen
Monte Carlo
Lakeland,Fl

Work tends to get in the way of boat building

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Stuart
Posts: 583
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2005 6:43 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by Stuart »

I don't know your location but Noah's in Canada has the best prices on stainless screws. http://www.noahsboatbuilding.com/noahma ... p?Cc=8&Bc=
These are self taping screws and not actually wood screws. Just a touch lighter duty and you must predrill the through hole just a tiny bit larger. For really large bolts you can use galvanized, but make sure its hot dipped.

Far as wood is concerned, anyone have anything to say about using Douglas Fir? In my opinion it has all the properties of a good wood but it looks rather like crap. Veneer is cheap. Better to save money on the wood than the fasteners. Mahogany looks nice but $1000 worth would fit in the trunk of your car. There are other woods, just don't buy EPI and maybe Spanish Cedar is a bad idea too. Not sure about mixing oak and stainless. Think there is a problem there which may end in a sinking. Somebody will know.

Stuart

Trackhappy
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Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 5:42 pm
Location: Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. Building Gentry.

Re: Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by Trackhappy »

Be careful with stainless steel screws. Stainless steel bolts in accessible places only if they are 316 or better. Normal stainless steel screws are not suitable, usually 304 or similar which will rot. Stick to Silicon Bronze for anything hidden in my opinion. As far as price, So far Glen-L seems to have been the best I can find.
By the time I have built a boat, I'll be ready to build a boat....

Rob Myran
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Viroqua, Wisconsin

Re: Fasteners for amigo frames

Post by Rob Myran »

For selecting lumber, a good place to start is right here on the Glen-L site:
http://www.glen-l.com/wood-plywood/wp-index.html

I think I would select white oak for frames if I was building an Amigo at this time.
( I hope to as my next boat). I would also avoid stainless steel screws in fastening the hull. Stick with Bronze. When they find 3000 year old wrecks it is the bronze that looks like you could take it out and re-use it. Stainless steel does corrode and there are a lot of allows of stainless so strength and durability is all over the place. Also stainless can fracture and fail without any visible signs beforehand.

I have been planning to experiment with some local woods for some skin on frame kayak building. I am beginning to have a "thing" about importing exotic (expensive wood that puts building out of reach for so many and also begs issues of sustainability of forests. I live in Western Wisconsin and have a fair amount of woods on my property. One species that interests me is white hickory or "pignut" hickory. It is used in steam bending for furniture, is quite strong. It is supposed to be pretty rot resistant as well. But my point in bringing this up is wood should be researched before using on any large, expensive, and time consuming boat building project. On something as small as a kayak frame it would not matter so much if the wood selected was less than ideal.

- Rob
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

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