Amigo plans

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Andy
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:38 pm

Amigo plans

Post by Andy » Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:49 pm

I'm looking to buy a set of Amigo plans. If you've purchased a set and decided not to build, I'd be interested in them. Thx.Andy

Oyster
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Location: North Carolina

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Oyster » Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:57 pm

Why not order a set from Glen L? Its easy, simple and a safe bet that you will get all the appropiate pages and will also be supporting the forum that gives away help free of charge too to builders.

Andy
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Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:38 pm

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Andy » Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:21 pm

Honestly, I'm still on the fence. I keep coming back to the Amigo so I'm probably going to commit sooner or later. Meanwhile, I'm scrounging up materials. I've got some great Doug Fir and I just met a guy with a Woodmizer that's milling up a truck load of spruce :D

Rob Myran
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Viroqua, Wisconsin

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Rob Myran » Sun Feb 13, 2011 9:49 am

First, I would buy them from Glen-L Direct. Kinda "dance with the girl ya brought to the dance" as they say. Glen-L is great company, lots of support, good prices on lots of their supplies. And we all want to see them stay in business through the hard times.

Second:
Honestly, I'm still on the fence. I keep coming back to the Amigo so I'm probably going to commit sooner or later. Meanwhile, I'm scrounging up materials. I've got some great Doug Fir and I just met a guy with a Woodmizer that's milling up a truck load of spruce
Me too. I plan to build one after I finish the Minuet this Spring and get to play with her a while.

As I look at what I would like next that fits my particular needs and wants, the Amigo continues to look like a great boat. For me, who mostly solo sails it comes down to this. It is a tough off-shore capable boat that is trailerable. It has standing headroom which allows longer periods aboard in comfort. It can carry enough food and gear and supplies for reasonable cruising times.

Living on the West side of Wisconsin and having grown up in Milwaukee I am looking for a boat that I would feel safe cruising the Great Lakes. Lake Superior is where I like to go from where I live the most. But I would also like to take it to Florida and the East Coast, and perhaps if Gas prices in the coming years don't go too high The West Coast Vancouver area and Perhaps up to Alaska. Much of this is not what my Precision 21 would be suited for, except the trailering part. The ballast on the Amigo weighs about what the whole P-21 does.

Third: The Amigo is just a nice looking sailboat! Not fast, but, not designed for that. Full keel mean easy tracking and more comfort at sea. The only decision for me will be whether to build for the simpler slope rig or the "sexier" gaff rig with the bow sprit.
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

Andy
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:38 pm

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Andy » Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:26 pm

Too bad it isn't just a little bigger. Conventional wisdom is that you can get away with stretching a boat a little by increasing the stations 10%. When I was researching the Amigo, I found a thread from a guy who wanted to do the same thing but the designers at glen-l said it shouldn't be changed at all. Too bad-a 24 would be perfect for my needs....

Rob Myran
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Viroqua, Wisconsin

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Rob Myran » Mon Feb 14, 2011 8:03 pm

I recall back when Ken Hankinson had his own web site of plans he had a 24 design that was much as the Pacific Seacraft Flicka is to the Dana.

But I think Glen-L is right that you should not mess with the size. There are too many variables to go wrong for an amateur builder. When customers ask designers to tweak a design like that they usually end up redesigning the whole boat. If the Amigo is too small for your needs, you need to find a different design. Perhaps the 27 foot long James Cook would suit your desires better. I like that boat a lot, too. If built carefully so it does not get too heavy, it could still be built good and strong for offshore use in comfort.

You might also look at George Buehler's Little Big Man. At 25'6" it is a trailerable design that has some looks in common with the Amigo, but is a single chine design. My favorite of the Buehler designs remains the Archimedes Schooner. However that 43' on deck boat is to big a project and rather impractical for a guy who usually solo sails as I am. But it sure is pretty. I always liked schooners. :)
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

Rob Myran
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Viroqua, Wisconsin

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Rob Myran » Mon Feb 14, 2011 8:17 pm

Another point. If you want the Amigo to be bigger inside, use an outboard motor which would free up the space inside used by the diesel engine and its tank. That can add as much as 20% of usable interior space. That's storage for a lot of samiches and beer. A bonus: Outboards are cheaper to replace than diesels. Since this is a sailboat, how much do you really use an engine anyway? You can use a solar panel or small wind turbine to charge the house batteries or even a small quiet gas generator stored in the cockpit. A fuel locker can store plenty of gas and even be a place to stash the generator.
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

Andy
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:38 pm

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Andy » Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:17 pm

Rob Myran wrote:I recall back when Ken Hankinson had his own web site of plans he had a 24 design that was much as the Pacific Seacraft Flicka is to the Dana.

But I think Glen-L is right that you should not mess with the size. There are too many variables to go wrong for an amateur builder. When customers ask designers to tweak a design like that they usually end up redesigning the whole boat. If the Amigo is too small for your needs, you need to find a different design. Perhaps the 27 foot long James Cook would suit your desires better. I like that boat a lot, too. If built carefully so it does not get too heavy, it could still be built good and strong for offshore use in comfort.

You might also look at George Buehler's Little Big Man. At 25'6" it is a trailerable design that has some looks in common with the Amigo, but is a single chine design. My favorite of the Buehler designs remains the Archimedes Schooner. However that 43' on deck boat is to big a project and rather impractical for a guy who usually solo sails as I am. But it sure is pretty. I always liked schooners. :)
You may be referring to the Allegra which is actually a Bingham design. If you google it, it seems that Hankinson sold the plans without Binghams permission but there's probably more to the story. The Allegra was my first choice but I can't find the plans. I could make the Amigo work for my needs. I know what you mean about an inboard. I was considering an electric dc motor. I'll have batteries onboard anyway and I don't plan on motoring much. Still need to research it though...

Rob Myran
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Viroqua, Wisconsin

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Rob Myran » Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:06 am

I could make the Amigo work for my needs. I know what you mean about an inboard. I was considering an electric dc motor. I'll have batteries on board anyway and I don't plan on motoring much. Still need to research it though...
Curious: What are the main uses / needs for the boat you want to build?

My own general criteria:
Trailerability. Plan to trailer a lot or a little? Size of boat important there ( and size of tow vehicle.
Time cruising. Liveability for extended periods and number on board
Predominent use - Offshore or coastal . Goes to supplies needed to be carried and seaworthyness seakindlyness.
My thoughts seem to always go back to have the smallest boat that fits your needs. Small boats get used, big boats sit. Cost of building, maintenance, and slip/mooring fees go up dramatically with size.
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

Andy
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:38 pm

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Andy » Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:34 am

I will be using it mostly for off shore cruising, island hopping in the Carribean and gunkholing off the coast of South America. I don't care about trailering. It would be nice but it's not really a design consideration. I have a couple of trucks that would pull anything that I would build. I'm a minimalist and will be single-handing. Safety and seakindly motion in a small package is what I'm after.

Rob Myran
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Viroqua, Wisconsin

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Rob Myran » Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:52 am

Sounds like the Amigo would fit you needs pretty well.
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

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Mark Chadwick
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Location: Mississauga, ON Canada

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Mark Chadwick » Thu Feb 17, 2011 2:44 pm

Much good discussion. Selection of the right design with knowledge of the requirments for how the boat will be used, and understanding the trade-offs.

In regard to the plans, I don't think I saw anyone mention purchasing the study plans to assist in making a more informed selection? A very small investment!

Just a thought.

Cheers

Mark C

Andy
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:38 pm

Re: Amigo plans

Post by Andy » Mon Feb 28, 2011 5:10 pm

Bought them.

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