Basic Questions

Dinghies, day sailers, world cruisers. Many small sailboats make ideal rowboats or low-speed power boats.

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Bechorovka
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Basic Questions

Post by Bechorovka » Thu May 19, 2011 12:13 pm

I'd like to build a boat in a few years, and want to know what I need as far as facilities. I would like to eventually build a sailboat large enough for my wife and a couple of friends to live aboard, and sail the ocean. At what size do I need slings or a drydock? I am brand new at this, so I'm starting from square one. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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DaveLott
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by DaveLott » Thu May 19, 2011 4:21 pm

Welcome. You might want to put your location in your profile for others to see for future reference.

Regarding facilities to build. Wow!!. There is a saying that if there is a will there is a way. I suspect you will be building something of size. There are a number of builds going on now that are large. Some are built inside warehouses. But mostly I am seeing people erect temporary shelters to protect them from the sun and rain while they build.

You might want to take a look a the picture archives of some of the large designs you are interested in. These will guide you to what others are doing.

Good luck. You have an ambitious project.

dave
Dave

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Bill Edmundson » Thu May 19, 2011 5:09 pm

Bechorovka

For me the theshold for liveaboard for a couple would be 35 feet. UPSPirate has been a liveaboard and will be in shortly, I'm sure, with first hand knowledge.

Bill
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upspirate

Re: Basic Questions

Post by upspirate » Thu May 19, 2011 8:28 pm

Hey!

I lived on a 38' sailboat with my ex-wife(not boat related,we split after moving ashore)....we found that size fine(maybe could have gone down to 32 or 35',but even 38 got small at times).

For more than that,I'd have to take a look at 45-50 at the very least.

I don't know what you mean by slings or dry dock.....you mean to launch??

Bechorovka
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Bechorovka » Thu May 19, 2011 9:30 pm

I'm wondering how a larger boat, 25+' is built. As far as if you construct it upside down, as I've seen in some pictures, how you flip it. Or, I've seen in pictures of the 25' Ensenada, its up in slings. Some other boats seem to be in an almost horseshoe shaped cradle. I would like to build some larger boats, my idea right now is hopefully build a small first boat, then the Ensenada, and then a 35'-45' (or whatever I deem neccesary) to live aboard for retirement. So before I start I want to see what I will need to see this dream come to fruition, and if I can really do it.

Thanks in advance

Brian Eager
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Brian Eager » Tue May 24, 2011 3:58 pm

Here's a link to a story on how one builder did the Yukon. Not a sailboat, but in the size range you're considering. It's interesting to see how he solved the questions of where to build, how to turn the hull, etc.

http://www.glen-l.com/misc/yukonart1.html
Noah was a first-time boatbuilder

Rob Myran
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Rob Myran » Sat May 28, 2011 4:29 pm

I'd like to build a boat in a few years, and want to know what I need as far as facilities. I would like to eventually build a sailboat large enough for my wife and a couple of friends to live aboard, and sail the ocean. At what size do I need slings or a drydock? I am brand new at this, so I'm starting from square one. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Facilities to build a boat in? Depends where. If you are in the north with winter, you want a heatable building for your own comfort and so epoxy will cure and paint will dry. If in the south you want shelter from rain and bugs. You will probably also want to be near water so it can be hauled and launched without too much expense. You would probably launch with a travel lift. Trailer launching usually is practical only to about 27 feet - too small a boat for your purposes, unless it was only you and your wife, but even then - living space!

Size of the boat? Boat costs and maintenance expenses go up exponetially as the size does. Build only what fits your uses.
If you and your wife will permanantly live aboard, will your friends also? Then you need enough space for personal space and some privacy. A berth for each couple, fer instance. If it will be your boat (ownership-wise) and others will live aboard for a cruise only then a bit smaller boat will be feasable, though privacy space is still good.

Two more items Budget for building and time to build. A big boat should be built like military campaign - plan it out and get'r-done. So have money for the build and for living during it put up ahead.

Good luck
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

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Stuart
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Stuart » Sat May 28, 2011 7:48 pm

@Bechorovka

I put off replying to your post so you could get some encouraging posts read before I put down some hard lines about the reality of building a bigger boat. I am building a 25 ft sailboat and have been doing so for a few years. I have been building only in the summers and totally outside without a building. Its a long job. It's not difficult but it is more difficult than building a barn and I have remarked to myself many times, its about as much as I can handle, any larger and it would not get finished. Toss into the mix, a year laid up sick, complaints from neighbours, and years when it rained every day. It also takes up money and its not a small amount. Include into the price of wood and fittings the cost of any tools and consumables. It's only when the hull is completed that the boat could be moved so I'm lucky I didn't have any home owners association demanding the boat be removed. There are other things that can happen, and with a big boat, if they do happen, what are you going to do when you have $20000 invested into wood in the shape of a boat you can't move and can't finish.
I would not build a boat bigger than 25ft alone and it will take several hours every evening for a few years so your life style will revolve around that boat for a long, long time. So the question is, why are you building? Certainly a boat can be amateur built for a bit less but a good used boat can be cheaper or some older boats can be rebuilt quicker. There is no reason why you can't build a bigger boat, but it will take time and could take 5 years or more depending on how you approach it.
I look at this way, you can be wealthy and own a boat but regardless of how much money you have, money won't saw wood or turn a screw. When you pull into a port, and you're the builder, you're a wealther man. The amount of effort it requires to custom build a larger boat is absolutely indicitive of a persons self worth. That and being skilled enough to build a boat the way you want it built, those are about the only reasons I would think a person builds a bigger boat.
Building a boat can be a pleasant experience but it can also turn on you if you approach it with the intent of meeting a completion date. If you do not build for the joy of working with wood and the pleasure of seeing each step completed successfully and beautifully then the work becomes a burdensome labour that has delayed you from doing the things you otherwise would want to be doing.
I would not encourage you to build or not to build only to be aware that rewards are awarded according to the challenge and the bigger the boat the greater the challenge and it is significant.

Stuart

Bechorovka
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Bechorovka » Sat May 28, 2011 8:02 pm

Thank you everyone for your feedback. More than anything I'm researching. The big boat would be for retirement, and I'm 27 right now, so I'm in no rush. I also work a shift schedule, so I work 24 hours and have two days off.

Rob Myran
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Rob Myran » Sun May 29, 2011 5:20 pm

If the big boat would be for retirement, I would suggest you build a small boat now. See if you like building a boat. See if you like sailing and the small boat gives you a lot of experience sailing and handling a lively boat that the big boat does not do in the same way. Then before taking on building a big boat, I would suggest you get some cruises under your belt as crew on others big boats and chartering on vacations.

Sailing is a great hobby and endeavor. You can take it where you want = gunk-holing around in little boats, cruising, racing, and living aboard. Boat building is its own endeavor. Some people find they like building boats better than sailing them. Others want a specific boat that fits their own particular needs and idiosyncrasies. No matter what building a boat means you will be able to repair or modify it as needed because you will know it so intimately.
Another fine mess I've gotten myself into!

ricaluanna
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by ricaluanna » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:01 pm

My husband is also building a boat for us. I am really excited.

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Mark Chadwick
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Re: Basic Questions

Post by Mark Chadwick » Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:48 am

Hi

You mentioned that you are interested in building a sailboat. Do you already sail? It is a skill that needs to be developed and perhaps your are already aware of all this.

You will aquire skills and expertise as you go through the building process. When the "big boat" finally hits the water you probably want to make sure you have the skills to be her skipper, to keep her, your crew and yourself safe.

Starting early is a good thing because you will have time to develop these skills in parallel over time. The sailing skills to develop into a competent skipper for a 35ft plus sailboat usually require courses, instruction and just plain experience on the water. I can tell you from personal experience you want to build up the skills overtime and it is much easier to start with smaller boats and work up as your confidence and skills build.

You really don't want to be learning to handle a boat that large, in a crowded marina on your launch day with large groups of family, friends and various spectators looking on. The stress will be incredible.

Warren: would you agree?

Cheers

Mark C

upspirate

Re: Basic Questions

Post by upspirate » Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:06 pm

Yes I would Mark.

I have been taught by my instructor, and believe now that I have some experience, that if you learn to sail on a small boat,you become a better sailor.

Trimming wrong on a small boat will dump your butt in the water where as on a large vessel,you just pick up bad or inefficient habits.

You learn good habits on a small boat,and they carry over to the larger ones.

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