Glue and Screw Bottom Battens to Planking??

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sfoord
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Glue and Screw Bottom Battens to Planking??

Post by sfoord » Sun Sep 30, 2018 9:30 am

I am building a Glen-L 19 Sailboat and getting ready to attach bottom planking. The instructions just says to glue all matting surfaces and screw per the fastening schedule. The fastening schedule makes no mention of screwing the bottom planking to the battens.
Not sure if I should
a) Glue and screw battens to planking
b) Just glue battens to planking
c) No glue or screws on battens to planking
On other boats I have always glued and screwed battens to planking but this being my first sailboat I am not sure - maybe the hull needs to flex or something.
Any advice or insight please
Thanks! Simon
Simon Foord
Malahini
Glen-L 19

bruce48
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Re: Glue and Screw Bottom Battens to Planking??

Post by bruce48 » Thu Oct 04, 2018 9:39 am

I'm building the Minuet and glued and screwed the planking to the battens.

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sfoord
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Re: Glue and Screw Bottom Battens to Planking??

Post by sfoord » Thu Oct 04, 2018 10:38 am

Thanks for your reply.
After searching some more I found a post from someone with the same question for the same boat. Kinda made me feel better!
The answer is to glue and screw the battens to the planking per Gayle. Here is the post from 2007
viewtopic.php?t=4166#p27759
Thanks!
Simon
Simon Foord
Malahini
Glen-L 19

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Stuart
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Re: Glue and Screw Bottom Battens to Planking??

Post by Stuart » Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:53 am

I know there are a lot of situations where glue is considered all that is correct and all that is needed. Most of my cussi'n comes from years of trying to find pieces of furniture legs that have partly fallen apart from sitting in a wet basement. In wooden aircraft, glue, no screws and away they go doing stalls and loops. I will say, in the wooden wings I have worked on I found the tiny little nails hold the bits together even after the glue has failed. Its significant for such small nails. Most builders take them out, save 1 lb in weight. I leave them in. Sooner or later you are going to find a piece of wood that for one of many reasons fails to glue up well. If there are screws at reasonable intervals, the panel will probably stay with the boat until you can get if repaired. I would disregard any plans that say don't bother to use fasteners. The time to screw is not excessive and it also helps to prevent voids. The additional weight is insignificant and the cost, in my opinion, worth it.
Gluing up plywood for nails does take preparation. Where ever there is a curve, lay the plywood on the lawn and it will curl upward at the edges. Its significant. Before you do that you clamp the wood on the hull to the battens, outline all the battens with a pencil, take the panel off and drill all the screw holes, set in all the screws and lay it on the grass, when it has curled up, apply glue to the battens, clamp it and screw it down with a power driver. The job must be done quickly and use slow cure epoxy on a cool day. Trust me, I'm not an engineer.

Stuart

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