Glen L 14 Keel Line up

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Rational Root
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Glen L 14 Keel Line up

Post by Rational Root » Tue May 20, 2008 6:23 am

From the transom to the frame that connects to the Centerboard case appears to be basically a straight line.

When I clamp the keel to the transom and the stem, the curve is up to 1/4 inch over the frames between the transom and the CB case.

It I clamp it here. It will run flat, with more curve across the cb case.

I have measured the frames carefully, they seem to be at the correct height.

Any thoughts ?

Thanks

Dave
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PapaDon
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Post by PapaDon » Tue May 20, 2008 9:26 am

This is an interesting post Dave. I don't know what your plans tell you on this subject (hell, I don't know what mine say) but it always seemed reasonable to me to build the BOAT (keel) first, then fit the CB case to IT. Seems to me you're approaching it from the opposite direction. If you're confident that your frames are positioned correctly, I'd say go ahead and slap them together. You MAY find that 1/4 inch disappearing, but at any rate, you should end up with the desired (designed) shape of the keel.  Cut out the 'hole' (geez! I hate that word) required THEN worry about the case.  Does this mean you'll have to build another? I doubt it, but it may take some serious work to make it fit.  Anyone else? Am I missing something also?           Good luck.  I know you'll be keeping us posted as to your progress.
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Beechdrvr
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Post by Beechdrvr » Tue May 20, 2008 10:07 am

Dave,
I had the same situation. What I did was go ahead and fasten the keel to the transom and frames up to the CB. Then I applied boiling rags over the rest of the keel to the stem and let that soak. Keep them hot by repeatedly resoaking them in your boiling pot. Even after they cool its best to keep the keel soaked overnight. Then crank the keel around to the stem and secure it. Now, having said that, if I had to do it again I would do one of these two things.

First, the ultimate way would be to make a pattern from a straight line above the boat to were all the frames touch the keel. Transfer this to a sheet of ply and screw blocks to the appropriate "offsets" for each frame. this is your bending pattern. Then steam the keel and bend it around the blocks and let it sit overnight. Dont forget to add alittle to the curve to account for springback.

Secondly what might be easier, if steaming is not practical, is to put the keel in a tub of water and let it sit for a day or two and get nice and water logged. It will become a bit more plyable and you'll be able to bend it over the frames that way.

How I did it was the worst of the ways I just suggested because even though the keel did take a set after letting her sit over night, by the time I fastened it to the stem that particular frame moved on the jig and it ended up throwing my sheer line off abit. It took considerably more pressure on the keel to muscle it into place than I thought.

Hope that helped
Doug

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Rational Root
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The CB case is already built.....

Post by Rational Root » Wed May 21, 2008 12:02 am

Cutting a matching hole is easy enough with a router and a few bits of ply.

Take a long peice of 3/4 inch ply and stand the cb case up on it. Screw long thin strips of ply either side, touching the cb case. Screw two small pieces of ply at each end. (countersink the screws)

Take the case away. Cut most of the slot out with a jig saw, keep at least 1/8th inches from the edges. Then tidy the edges with a router and a bearing bit - the bearing runs on the strips you have screwed in place.

You now have a slot in the 3/4 ply that you can test fit to the cb case.

Then clamp the 3/4 inch ply in place on the keel, (lots of measuring and checking etc), mark the slot. Cut out most of it with the jig saw, and then fire away again with the router. This time being careful regarding the grain direction.

Voila.

What could possibly go wrong. :roll:

I suspect that since the keel with be bent, I will need to finish the ends of the slot by hand with a really sharp chisel and a big rasp, the router would cut square to the curved keel, but I can live with that, and epoxy covers a multitude of sins. :wink:

I have still to attach the bedlogs to the cb case, after I do final shaping. I will not have nails coming through from the inside. I can live with that. If I can get clamps to reach in well enough I will likely use Balcotan PU. In my own testing, this stuff grips like the Devil himself.

Dave
PapaDon wrote:This is an interesting post Dave. I don't know what your plans tell you on this subject (hell, I don't know what mine say) but it always seemed reasonable to me to build the BOAT (keel) first, then fit the CB case to IT. Seems to me you're approaching it from the opposite direction. If you're confident that your frames are positioned correctly, I'd say go ahead and slap them together. You MAY find that 1/4 inch disappearing, but at any rate, you should end up with the desired (designed) shape of the keel. Cut out the 'hole' (geez! I hate that word) required THEN worry about the case. Does this mean you'll have to build another? I doubt it, but it may take some serious work to make it fit. Anyone else? Am I missing something also? Good luck. I know you'll be keeping us posted as to your progress.
Hey! I built a boat ! No Really, I did !
http://davesboat.blogspot.com/

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